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Flat earth theory?

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posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy
a reply to: RickOShea

"Required satellite dish"? Are you taking the pish?


According to other posters a satellite connection requires a well aimed satellite dish. Did you miss this?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: RickOShea

Are you allergic to knowledge or something?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy




Are you allergic to knowledge or something?


Are you mad about something, or something?




It's a satellite network. No dish required.


What do you mean no dish required because network?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux




What did you not understand about, “in contrast to radio waves of higher frequency which travel in straight lines (line-of-sight propagation)”


Isnt Long Wave lower frequency and Short Wave higher frequency?


Read the actual entry and tell me...




Shortwave radio is radio transmission using shortwave radio frequencies. There is no official definition of the band, but the range always includes all of the high frequency band (HF), and generally extends from 3–30 MHz (10 to 100 metres); above the medium frequency band (MF), to the end of the HF band.

Radio waves in the shortwave band can be reflected or refracted from a layer of electrically charged atoms in the atmosphere called the ionosphere. Therefore, short waves directed at an angle into the sky can be reflected back to Earth at great distances, beyond the horizon. This is called skywave or "skip" propagation. Thus shortwave radio can be used for very long distance communication, in contrast to radio waves of higher frequency which travel in straight lines (line-of-sight propagation) and are limited by the visual horizon, about 64 km (40 miles). Shortwave radio is used for broadcasting of voice and music to shortwave listeners over very large areas; sometimes entire continents or beyond. It is also used for military over-the-horizon radar, diplomatic communication, and two-way international communication by amateur radio enthusiasts for hobby, educational and emergency purposes, as well as for long distance aviation and marine communications.

en.m.wikipedia.org...


The rest of the post you ignored..

Would you like to cite what frequencies are utilized by satellite TV for example, and why.



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux

So you going to ignore the mistake in your Wiki source I just pointed out?

I didnt ignore anything that was relevant. The statement I made was 100% correct.
edit on 1-8-2019 by RickOShea because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: neutronflux




Would you like to cite what frequencies are utilized by satellite TV for example, and why.


Long wave, or LOWER frequencies, that travel in a straight line and require a near perfectly aimed satellite dish.



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux




Would you like to cite what frequencies are utilized by satellite TV for example, and why.


Long wave, or LOWER frequencies, that travel in a straight line and require a near perfectly aimed satellite dish.


Quote or cite a source that makes such a claim.



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: RickOShea

Hint. You know the difference between megahertz and gigahertz?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:18 PM
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originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux

So you going to ignore the mistake in your Wiki source I just pointed out?

I didnt ignore anything that was relevant. The statement I made was 100% correct.


Then quote my actual mistake?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: neutronflux


Thus shortwave radio can be used for very long distance communication



in contrast to radio waves of higher frequency which travel in straight lines


Longwave is not of higher frequency than shortwave......



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: RickOShea



Definition of: AM radio

Amplitude Modulation radio) Radio broadcasting in the 540-1610 kHz frequency band (in the Americas) with 10 kHz spacing between channels.

www.pcmag.com...





short·wave
a radio wave of a wavelength between about 10 and 100 m (and a frequency of about 3 to 30 MHz).





FM broadcasting

Throughout the world, the FM broadcast band falls within the VHF part of the radio spectrum. Usually 87.5 to 108.0 MHz is used,[2] or some portion thereof, with few exceptions:

en.m.wikipedia.org...






Ka-Band
Ka-band is the newest satellite broadcast band. Ranging from 27 GHz to 40 GHz. Ka-band is used by Wildblue and DIRECTV. Wildblue uses Ka-band for delivering of satellite broadband and DIRECTV uses Ka-band to supplement their existing Ku band channel capacity.

DIRECTV plans to use two sections of Ka bandwidth. 18.3 - 18.8 GHZ and another 500 MHz band at 19.7 to 20.2.

Wildblue uses 19.7 to 20.2 GHz for the signal sent to the Wildblue customers dish (User Downlink) and 29.5 to 30.0 GHz for sending signal out to the satellite from the users dish (Users Uplink). Go here for more information on Wildblue Satellite Internet frequency allocations.


www.dbsinstall.com...



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux


Thus shortwave radio can be used for very long distance communication



in contrast to radio waves of higher frequency which travel in straight lines


Longwave is not of higher frequency than shortwave......



You do understand the difference between megahertz and gigahertz?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: RickOShea

Again....


originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux




Would you like to cite what frequencies are utilized by satellite TV for example, and why.


Long wave, or LOWER frequencies, that travel in a straight line and require a near perfectly aimed satellite dish.


Quote or cite a source that makes such a claim.



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:39 PM
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Can you make a coherent point to counter anything I said?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: RickOShea

Again...


originally posted by: RickOShea
a reply to: neutronflux

So you going to ignore the mistake in your Wiki source I just pointed out?

I didnt ignore anything that was relevant. The statement I made was 100% correct.


Then quote my actual mistake?



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: RickOShea
Can you make a coherent point to counter anything I said?


What are you saying.




Satellite Dish Installations
Line of Sight

A satellite dish must have a clear line of sight to the satellite. The largest mistake an inexperienced or careless installer will make is locating a dish where trees will partially block the satellite signal, resulting in a lower then normal signal level. ANY signal blockage is unacceptable. Even if you have a clear picture, you can have signal blockage. A satellite dish with a clear line of sight will deliver a signal average of at least 75-80.
Image 1 shows a satellite system which will lose reception when the tree in front of the dish grows leaves. The distant evergreens will not be an issue for several years. Here the small tree was removed.

www.dbsinstall.com...




posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: neutronflux




What are you saying.


I see. More proof that you are not touching anything I said and posting random links making no relevant point at all.



posted on Aug, 1 2019 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: RickOShea

Then why wouldn’t satellite broadcasting be line of sight? Why would Ka-Band have the same ability to skywave or "skip" propagation as shortwave?



posted on Aug, 2 2019 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: RickOShea

What happened, you were posting like crazy yesterday?



posted on Aug, 2 2019 @ 04:10 AM
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a reply to: neutronflux

His details seem to have disappeared. Does that mean he's been banned?




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