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Tabby's Star Just Got Even Stranger , again

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posted on Oct, 4 2016 @ 08:04 PM
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originally posted by: AshFan

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: AshFan
The prevailing scientific knowledge on this, is that the star is shy, and Keplar spying on it is making it bashful.


Tabby's Star is 1,480 light years from Earth, therefore the light we are seeing today left the star in approximately 536 AD, a time well before Kepler. Tabby's Star could not possibly know that Kepler is spying on it these last few years. Therefore that hypothesis is proven invalid. Try again? (Y/N) __
.


Quantum super awareness duh. Spooky knowledge at a distance.


Nice try! Let's see now. Quantum entanglement is when you move an electron in one place, it's analog moves in another place way far away, thus defying speed of light and all that. So from single electrons we get to a space telescope looking at a star that is 1480 years way, and the star knows it? Now we have experimental data more or less proving the first. Do we have any experimental data proving the second? Or is this more of a drop of water from a rubber ducky in the bathtub kills a beautiful butterfly in China kind of thing?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:53 AM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: AshFan

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: AshFan
The prevailing scientific knowledge on this, is that the star is shy, and Keplar spying on it is making it bashful.


Tabby's Star is 1,480 light years from Earth, therefore the light we are seeing today left the star in approximately 536 AD, a time well before Kepler. Tabby's Star could not possibly know that Kepler is spying on it these last few years. Therefore that hypothesis is proven invalid. Try again? (Y/N) __
.


Quantum super awareness duh. Spooky knowledge at a distance.


Nice try! Let's see now. Quantum entanglement is when you move an electron in one place, it's analog moves in another place way far away, thus defying speed of light and all that. So from single electrons we get to a space telescope looking at a star that is 1480 years way, and the star knows it? Now we have experimental data more or less proving the first. Do we have any experimental data proving the second? Or is this more of a drop of water from a rubber ducky in the bathtub kills a beautiful butterfly in China kind of thing?



So... you are claiming that the butterfly is somehow in cahoots with the star? Interesting.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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originally posted by: AshFan

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: AshFan

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: AshFan
The prevailing scientific knowledge on this, is that the star is shy, and Keplar spying on it is making it bashful.


Tabby's Star is 1,480 light years from Earth, therefore the light we are seeing today left the star in approximately 536 AD, a time well before Kepler. Tabby's Star could not possibly know that Kepler is spying on it these last few years. Therefore that hypothesis is proven invalid. Try again? (Y/N) __
.


Quantum super awareness duh. Spooky knowledge at a distance.


Nice try! Let's see now. Quantum entanglement is when you move an electron in one place, it's analog moves in another place way far away, thus defying speed of light and all that. So from single electrons we get to a space telescope looking at a star that is 1480 years way, and the star knows it? Now we have experimental data more or less proving the first. Do we have any experimental data proving the second? Or is this more of a drop of water from a rubber ducky in the bathtub kills a beautiful butterfly in China kind of thing?



So... you are claiming that the butterfly is somehow in cahoots with the star? Interesting.


How you got there from what I said is what is interesting, but I'll go with it. Makes as much sense as these other theories.



posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 06:43 PM
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The latest observations of KIC 8462852, also known as Tabby's star or Boyajian's star, have scanned for the kind of laser emission that could be produced by a civilisation. Well, guess what. It's been three-and-a-half years since the discovery of KIC 8462852 was announced, and the way it dims and shines seemingly at random has proven a puzzle for astronomers.

In fact, it's so vexatious that one initial explanation involved "an alien megastructure" as the cause of these seemingly unnatural fluctuations.

The nickname of "alien megastructure star" stuck, but the explanation didn't. It was thrown out last year after analysis determined that some wavelengths of light were blocked more than others - which wouldn't be the case if a structure was doing the blocking.

ScienceAlert.com, Feb. 27, 2019 - Astronomers Have Scanned The Weird 'Megastructure' Star For Signs of Alien Lasers.

The story that gets back being strange but in a good way!

So after considering some kind of alien mega structure, doing the maths and realizing that the calculations do not match observation, somebody got the idea to comb observational data for signs of high energy laser usage. Now that too has been ruled out.

And the thing still dims!

Space is still mind numbingly big!



posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 06:46 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
Space is still mind numbingly big!

And keeps getting bigger.



posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift


Which is all the more reason to go there ourselves.

What is 1,470 ly anyway these days? According to Pias, all we do is get up to 1/2 C, then turn on his mass reduction device and we shoot up to luminous speeds. It is not like dusting crops, kid!




posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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The only thing that makes some sense, is that there is a black hole or other severe gravitational anomaly near it and optically between it and our solar system. There could be a gravitational lens effect causing an apparent distortion of the light or "shimmer" if you will. We must also remember that we can never image it standing still, as the entire solar system is moving in respect to this star.

We should be able to determine what that really is with much more accurate instruments, possibly by simultaneously measuring the star's light with a pair of Kepler type satellites that are separated a great distance apart. Such an interesting anomaly, indeed.



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