Strange Rock Carving

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posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by 1191julie
Thanks for the heads up on "Gia is the name you give Earth" Not trying to disrespect. Yes that is a good idea on the ignore button. You say giants I will have to read more on that, very interesting thanks Zachi


More info.
en.wikipedia.org...
The Gaia hypothesis is an ecological hypothesis proposing that the biosphere and the physical components of the Earth (atmosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere) are closely integrated to form a complex interacting system that maintains the climatic and biogeochemical conditions on Earth in a preferred homeostasis. Originally proposed by James Lovelock as the earth feedback hypothesis,[1] it was named the Gaia Hypothesis after the Greek primordial goddess of the Earth, at the suggestion of William Golding, Nobel prizewinner in literature and friend and neighbour of Lovelock.[2] The hypothesis is frequently described as viewing the Earth as a single organism. Lovelock and other supporters of the idea now call it Gaia theory, regarding it as a scientific theory and not mere hypothesis, since they believe it has passed predictive tests
end quote

Many "New Age" know-alls have added a sentient bent to the idea, ie. the Earth "thinks" or has "feelings" or is capable of "anger", typical of people who want to jump on the bandwagon of "enlightenment".




posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Looks to me that sometimes in the past people have carved out a "binde-rune" consisting of the two different runes from the Norwegian Younger Futhark (rune-"alfabet"). And being in West Virginia it's within the area we know Norwegian travellers very well may have reached in their travels to Vinland/North America about a millennium ago. But I have never seen anything like this from the "Viking era", but it's quite curious, since it seems to resemble a "binde-rune" made up from the rune Ás (facing leftward), which means god and is linked to Odin and the other (facing right) is a Kaun, which means torch and is linked to Heimdall, Frøya, Frøy and Mime. Since it is enclosed in a circle, and containing two letters linked directly to Odin, and how he sacrificed one of his eyes in order to drink from the well of Wisdom guarded by Mime, my guess is that we have to do with a binde-rune shaped like the Eye of Odin.

Such binde-runes were used for magic purposes, like spells, blessings or curses, for protection among other things, or simply as personal or group signatures used to mark ownership of territory or weapon or similar, most like today's corporate logos.

But I do think it looks a bit too modern, and I have never seen anything like it before. The vikings taught Indians how to extract iron from the ground and how to blacksmith and smelt iron. Until the Vikings came to Northern America in the tenth century the indigenous people used cold-hammered copper for axes, knives and such. And copper being quite soft a metal, I find it hard to believe it can have been made before the Vikings came around up there, you'd probably need iron or steel to carve symbols into rocks like that, but for all I know the rok is sandstone and it may be native, or like I pointed out, that it is of more modern origin. You should present your pictures to some archaeologists, so it can be dated and interpreted by someone better suited than myself. But great find indeed. With your permission I'd be glad to present the photo from the OP to a Norwegian archaeologist I know. He'd love it, I'm sure...

[edit on 3/4/2010 by Neo Christian Mystic]



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 09:59 AM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
And being in West Virginia it's within the area we know Norwegian travellers went about a millennium ago.


Again, I need to repeat those three thread-killer words...cite your sources. The only accepted proof of travels beyond L'ans aux Meadows is a butternut found on-site...and one would not have to travel to West Virginia to find a butternut tree.

I think the key lies in the two features on the sides of the circle. They likely speak to some kind of functionality.

I can accept that the carving denotes a sacred place, but it requires a professional to attach a date to it.



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


www.hurstwic.org...

According to many researchers the foundations of this tower in Newport, Rhode Island was layed by Norwegian travellers some thousand years ago. But I agree, I'll edit the text so it becomes more vague.



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
According to many researchers the foundations of this tower in Newport, Rhode Island was layed by Norwegian travellers some thousand years ago.


Interesting site you linked me to, and yes the Newport Tower is still fiercely debated. The Maine Penny has been explained as it was found in a sealed context with a First Nations toolkit originating in Labrador, so the best answer is that it was carried down from there by a Native.

Lots of healthy conjecture, lots of mystery...a serious paucity of proof. But one heck of an interesting discussion, just the same.



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by FibroKat
Does the rock have some blue in it, or am I seeing things? Are those splotches of blue or something else? Thanks....


Yes, elements of it have a grayish-blue tinge, giving it an overall bluish appearance on the parts not coated with silt.



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
reply to post by nenothtu
 


Looks to me that sometimes in the past people have carved out a "binde-rune" consisting of the two different runes from the Norwegian Younger Futhark (rune-"alfabet"). And being in West Virginia it's within the area we know Norwegian travellers very well may have reached in their travels to Vinland/North America about a millennium ago. But I have never seen anything like this from the "Viking era", but it's quite curious, since it seems to resemble a "binde-rune" made up from the rune Ás (facing leftward), which means god and is linked to Odin and the other (facing right) is a Kaun, which means torch and is linked to Heimdall, Frøya, Frøy and Mime. Since it is enclosed in a circle, and containing two letters linked directly to Odin, and how he sacrificed one of his eyes in order to drink from the well of Wisdom guarded by Mime, my guess is that we have to do with a binde-rune shaped like the Eye of Odin.

Such binde-runes were used for magic purposes, like spells, blessings or curses, for protection among other things, or simply as personal or group signatures used to mark ownership of territory or weapon or similar, most like today's corporate logos.

But I do think it looks a bit too modern, and I have never seen anything like it before. The vikings taught Indians how to extract iron from the ground and how to blacksmith and smelt iron. Until the Vikings came to Northern America in the tenth century the indigenous people used cold-hammered copper for axes, knives and such. And copper being quite soft a metal, I find it hard to believe it can have been made before the Vikings came around up there, you'd probably need iron or steel to carve symbols into rocks like that, but for all I know the rok is sandstone and it may be native, or like I pointed out, that it is of more modern origin. You should present your pictures to some archaeologists, so it can be dated and interpreted by someone better suited than myself. But great find indeed. With your permission I'd be glad to present the photo from the OP to a Norwegian archaeologist I know. He'd love it, I'm sure...

[edit on 3/4/2010 by Neo Christian Mystic]


That's an interesting take, and a possibility I knew nothing about before to even consider. By all means, give the pictures to your archaeological acquaintance for assessment. I'd love to hear his take on it.

If necessary, I can e-mail the full resolution pictures, but I've been having a bit of trouble getting them to Prof-Rabbit. The maler daemon returns a timeout error after about 4 days, The pictures are 3000x4000 pixels, and hover around the 4.5 MB mark each. I may have to reduce the resolution by half or so, which shouldn't affect them that much, certainly not as much as cutting them all the way down to 640x480 to fit this page.



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


Thanks for your kind words, and now I just dropped the archaeologist a few lines with lnks to this thread, asking him to check it out. I guess the image is good enough for now. Hopefully he'll jusm at this and start researching it, but this is in the middle of his vacation, so I guess we'll have to wait patiently for a few days before he sends me a reply to my inquiry. He can possibly set you in contact with local archaeologists and scholars who could join you on a field trip to see the stone itself and possibly do some tests to find out more about it. Any way, a great find and an interesting subject S/F



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


Yes, I stumbled accross the site a little while ago, and found it to be both interesting and presenting good and well sourced out info on possible viking artifacts in North America. As a Norwegian I find stuff like this extremely interesting. Also there exists a supposed 15th century pre-Columbus Roman map based on a series of other maps, among them some Norwegian maps showing the coast of Greenland and a mapping of the island called Vinland. It does however not include the territories the Vikings refered to as Helluland and Markland which was probably located in the the inlands. The map has debated for it's athenticity, and speculated to be a 20th century forgery, but the questions still remain, no carbontesting has been done on the map as far as I know:

Page on the Vinland Map
Wikipedia page on the Vinland Map
Wikipedia picture of the map



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


I'll be heading back home today or tomorrow, and won't have access to the stone site from there. My cousin is still adamant about involving archaeologists when they come into the area later this month on an unrelated matter, and other folks around here are just as much against that. They have a fear that it WILL turn out to be something, and are wary of the influx of gawkers and hot dog stands they think that may produce.

I'll try to keep track of what's going on here from home.

That's a long-winded way of saying that waiting a few days for the opinion of your archaeologist friend is not a problem at all.


[edit on 2010/4/3 by nenothtu]



posted on Apr, 3 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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Originally posted by MsAmen
( I give to you appalachia as I too share that branch) I spent 10 years of my youth in the burbs of WV. You referenced hunting in your post. "Huntin" is a prevalent past time as is " Keepin ur opinion to urself ". The seldom known wonder of these hills is a freedom ("Dem hills provide"). WV is a lost outpost of free thought, ("Tree huggin hippies") deep faith ("Fire and brimstone") and rebellion ("This is my land, my life") Judging by the patina on the actual carving compared to the surrounding rock, I imagine that perhaps some 50 years ago a young man went out huntin, found himself bored and at odds with his "kin". Instead of " keepin an eye out ", he spent his time sitting quietly, carving an inscription that encompassed his loathing of senseless violence, love of nature, and respect for what it is to live. ( A circled tree- serenity- balance- strength) What’s lovely about this observation is no matter the time, place, person or perspective the inscription delivers the same definition. Truth is always just beyond what we see day to day. Truth is what catches the eye and motivates the heart to share. Perhaps another young man, years later came upon "good cover" and found himself thinking the same thoughts.

[edit on 30-3-2010 by MsAmen]


Damn good post. I personally agree and rather like that interpretation. 'Course, first thing I thought was the mary jane, like some other posters here.



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by pondrthis
 


LOL did you "see" him in the back of a VW van diggin' the weed back in the sixties and seventies, growing his hair and having dirt under his nails haha. That's just hillarious haha can't stop laughing



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by pondrthis
 
Thanks! I appreciate your sentiments. I believe we all owe nenothtu a round of applause for providing a magnificent thread for us diggers. The significance of this piece is that it conveys what we want to see in the world around us. I have since researched extensively and believe my original analysis is incorrect due to its size and position in the environment. I’ve hesitated posting any further views as I am waiting on the reply and opinion of a local archeologist.

[edit on 4-4-2010 by MsAmen]



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


Deny Ignorance.

I laughed heartily at a posters thread which inquired as to the validity of a magical camera (I still do, yet I feel terrible for posting my mockery. What purpose did this serve? ) I’ve extensively researched Nordic or Welsh claims to the territory. I’ve delayed in posting links or a final thought, as I desire an accurate assessment from all available resources. Your analysis does coincide with some current evaluation of other archeological sites; however this evaluation is just as laughable in some circles. The path of discovery is to examine all sides with eyes wide open.



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 10:41 PM
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For any who have come across this thread with questions as to dating the piece, categorizing the rocks composition or phylum, or are simply interested in the tools used to assess an archeological artifact, I ask you to review pages 14 and 15. Hopefully we can get some experts over here ( I am certainly no expert) who can answer theses questions.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by nenothtu
 


I just got a reply from the arcaeologist, and his initial reply was not very promising, sorry. Like I said he's obviously having his vacation now and is a busy man normally, always out traveling from here to there and he must have an incredibly fun job to say the least.

But his initial thoughts from looking at the picture and reading the discription, his first sentient was that the rock or rather the carvings didn't look very old, and he doubted that the writings were most likely not any rune inscription, so there goes my theory out the window, since, and I said it myself in my "theory" that it doesnot resemble any rune inscription I have ever seen before, and obviously he agreed to that atleast hehe. It seemed he had no idea what it was. This guy is an expert on viking age artifacts so I guess we would have to take his word on that it is most probably NOT having anything to do with vikings atleast.

But good luck in trying to figure out what this might be. It's a beautiful carving anyway. You should really try to convince your family that atleast the surface of the rock should be examined by experts as for carbon datings and finding out what kind of tools has been used etc. Anyway, it's a great rock, and I pressume it will remain a curiousity in the family until heaven falls down, I can nearly see you and your children and your childrens children bringing their children to watch and gaze at this fantasising over what it might be for generations ahead.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by MsAmen
 


Hehe, sorry, I just got a bit carried away there, hehe, it was just that the post I replied to seemed to mention Mary Jane and with the quote he had included I suddenly felt I understood what he meant there, with roaming in the "burbs of WV" back in the days and all. I just suddenly portrayed a hippie messing around in the back of his VW van trying to find some Mary Jane, like some Chech and Chong scene. I just broke up in laughter, and felt I had to post that silly remark for some reason, that's all....



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 03:24 PM
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While tooling around the net, I see that someone took your post and made it theirs-at another site. Well, they did give notice they saw it on ATS.

The person ran it on their website the same day. Thought you may like to know-for whatever reason.

Link:

naturalplane.blogspot.com...

It has 5 comments too.



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 03:24 PM
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While tooling around the net, I see that someone took your post and made it theirs-at another site. Well, they did give notice they saw it on ATS.

The person ran it on their website the same day. Thought you may like to know-for whatever reason.

Link:

naturalplane.blogspot.com...

It has 5 comments too.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 09:26 AM
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reply to post by prof-rabbit
 


Some fail to understand...without the Holy Spirit...there is no life...in anything.

There is enlightenment in understanding that the very world that offers you shelter, food, and water.....holds the Holy Spirit within it as well.

It is why we must consume life to have life....just as though we must consume spiritual things to grow in spirit.

There are orders and cycles to life, and the Holy Spirit has offered itself to all life.





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