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Large Scale Food Fraud By Major Food Companies - Alert

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posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:56 AM
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A lot of the products you buy may may claim it has various fruits in it,but an investigation has revealed large scale deception in such foods designed mislead to be deceptive.
Why is the FDA and the government not doing anything about it?


www.naturalnews.com...




The box imagery also falsely implies that you're buying and eating real strawberries, and this same deception is repeated across nearly all popular cereals.

In fact, this microscope image shows that the "strawberries" in product X are really just artificially colored bits containing no real fruit at all!

As you can see from the ingredients label shown on the right, the real ingredients used to fake the strawberries in Kellogg's Frosted Mini-Wheats are:



A whole list is shown with packaging of this deception to consumers.

www.naturalnews.com...



edit on 28-2-2014 by championoftruth because: spelling




posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 02:18 AM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


This is why I cannot stand naturalnews as a source. You cannot use words like "most likely from GMO" and be taken seriously by persons who understand science. Let's be sure we understand each other here, if they want people to believe the rest of the story, they have to stop using wording like that, and actually confirm the facts before going to print. They could easily find out whether the ingredients come from GMO sources, by getting them checked out by a biochemist or similar. They could have done that, but they didn't, they just published their assumptions along with the main body of the story.

Even if Kelloggs really are cheating people out of a good breakfast, muddying the story with ambiguous statements and assumptions will not help the cause of bringing these things to light. It is highly questionable, as a tactic.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


Despite the fact that your source is questionable at best, I still read it... despite how painfully obvious everything they stated was.

If one isn't smart enough to know that Cap'n Crunch Berries doesn't contain real fruits even if by its' horrible taste alone then maybe they deserve 'a mouthful of chemicals'.

You know, the whole survival of the fittest thingy.

I'm not too sure this is true fraud by any means.
edit on 28-2-2014 by doompornjunkie because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 03:24 AM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


I have never...not once been under the impression that froot loops was made from real fruit. I mean, froot and fruit aren't even the same words. I wonder if Boo Berries really have ghosts in them? And berries of some kind. It's just marketing, nothing more.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by Holographicmeat
 


Hummm. The nay-sayers and the side-trackers and the "we already knew this obvious stuff, don't bother trying to tell us it," people seems to have been laying in ambush for this type of thread. So who wins? Does a website have to be entirely perfect or scientific in what it reports? Are all of the phony advertising that they are giving us a mere toe-dip of awareness about a waste of time or a heads-up to do some further looking into this commercial fraud that gets worse with about every new product that pops out of that industry?

I hope the detractors that I mentioned in the first sentence forgive me for taking the license to use the "about" word in the above last sentence. I committed that unscientific deed because it certainly it doesn't come close to the misleading advertising that goes on in the food industry.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 03:59 AM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 


I am not saying that false advertising doesn't happen and is not a bad thing. It does and it is. That article is just a bad example is all. I honestly can not imagine anyone walking down a cereal isle and being confused and mislead by crunch berries. Crunch berries are a made up thing. I have never seen a crunch berry tree growing crunch berries. I honestly do not think they are trying to fool people into thinking it is made of real berries at all in any way or there is a real crunch berry tree out there somewhere. It would be the same as me saying I am surprised because I found out Franken Berry cereal is not made of human body parts and real berries.

edit on 2282014 by Holographicmeat because: added smiley face because the thought of body parts and berries cereal made me laugh, in a funny way not a crazy way



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 05:15 AM
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Not going to give NN any more web traffic, but come on, of course products are full of crap on whether or not the fruit is really in it. Read the labels people, you're in for an eye opener. Let's use oatmeal packets as an example. Not once in Quaker or store brands have I ever seen any real fruit in it, those fruit bits in peaches & cream, strawberries & cream, apples & cinnamon, etc are gelatin & dye. If you're ok with eating fake fruit bits, knock yourself out, but if this is something you want to avoid, read labels.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 05:29 AM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 

I used to work for a large chemical company. They had a display that moved from plant to plant as part of employee cheer-leading. There were a lot of everyday products that contained, in some form, the commodity chemicals that were shipped out daily by rail cars.

I have no problem using these every day products. It's just plain old organic chemistry on an industrial scale.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 05:30 AM
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NN doesn't deserve, my opinion, the electricity to run the servers.

So, "Crunch Berries" aren't real berries... "Froot Loops" aren't real fruit.

Do you "Dodge" when one comes down the road?
Why do they call it "Airbus" when the stops are on the ground?
Why do you "ship" things on a truck and a ship carries "cargo"?
There is no egg in eggplant.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 05:35 AM
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Maybe the very worse offender is "Grape Nuts"

It has no grapes.

It has no nuts.

Should be criminal, but Post cereals gets away with it. I don't know why they can't be charged with false advertising.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:13 AM
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TrueBrit
reply to post by championoftruth
 


This is why I cannot stand naturalnews as a source. You cannot use words like "most likely from GMO" and be taken seriously by persons who understand science. Let's be sure we understand each other here, if they want people to believe the rest of the story, they have to stop using wording like that, and actually confirm the facts before going to print. They could easily find out whether the ingredients come from GMO sources, by getting them checked out by a biochemist or similar. They could have done that, but they didn't, they just published their assumptions along with the main body of the story.

Even if Kelloggs really are cheating people out of a good breakfast, muddying the story with ambiguous statements and assumptions will not help the cause of bringing these things to light. It is highly questionable, as a tactic.


Ok fine...you're not happy with everything NN says or does (doesn't do)...but how do you feel about household named brands, cheating consumers and including fake ingredients in everyday household foodstuffs?

That our kids are eating...everyday, and we are being charged through the nose for..everyday.

Any strong opinions on that part of the OP?



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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MysterX

TrueBrit
reply to post by championoftruth
 


This is why I cannot stand naturalnews as a source. You cannot use words like "most likely from GMO" and be taken seriously by persons who understand science. Let's be sure we understand each other here, if they want people to believe the rest of the story, they have to stop using wording like that, and actually confirm the facts before going to print. They could easily find out whether the ingredients come from GMO sources, by getting them checked out by a biochemist or similar. They could have done that, but they didn't, they just published their assumptions along with the main body of the story.

Even if Kelloggs really are cheating people out of a good breakfast, muddying the story with ambiguous statements and assumptions will not help the cause of bringing these things to light. It is highly questionable, as a tactic.


Ok fine...you're not happy with everything NN says or does (doesn't do)...but how do you feel about household named brands, cheating consumers and including fake ingredients in everyday household foodstuffs?

That our kids are eating...everyday, and we are being charged through the nose for..everyday.

Any strong opinions on that part of the OP?



I really hate to be THAT guy but the truth of the matter is no one is forcing you to buy breakfast cereals. Your kids are only eating that stuff if YOU buy it for them. There are no laws that require you to buy Captian Crunch or Froot Loops. That is a conscious choice you make when you go to the store and buy groceries. If it upsets you that much it may ease your mind some if you start a garden or something and grow your own food.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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little kids can't make the distinction between froot and fruit
hence the advertizing brainwash every saturday morning

and there are multiple sources re kellogs and gmo
edit on 28-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:49 AM
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Danbones
little kids can't make the distinction between froot and fruit
hence the advertizing brainwash every saturday morning

and there are multiple sources re kellogs and gmo
edit on 28-2-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)


Yes, the ads reel them in with funny cartoon hijinks and child-hooking tinkling music, and then the famous use of downward looking eyes on many of the breakfast "cereal" boxes (the eyes of the character on the box look down so the small child looking up sees their faux friends "looking" at them and they scream to mommy or daddy to buy the box for them), and then, the coup de mace....sugar. The sugar addicts these little kids the same as if you shot them up, and for years afterwards they poison themselves courtesy of their imaginary friends enticing them from the front of the box.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:57 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 

So what if those cereals advertise on cartoon channels? Like it was said before, it is the parents responsibility to purchase the food their children are fed. America is becoming accustomed to just blame the big corp when really these people are making the conscience choice to purchase these 'chemicals' or are too lazy to read the labels that are required by FEDERAL LAW.

Seriously, what is it going to take for people to start taking responsibility in knowing what they are eating?? By the way, if the ingredients label has items listed that you can not or have trouble pronouncing then you probably shouldn't eat too much. Again all the ingredients are listed right there for you.

All NN did was make a scary article over something that a well trained chimp could have found out for himself.

Take the time and cook your kids a proper breakfast instead of taking the fast and dirty cereal route. It's what I do for my niece..



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


Yes.

Food fraud in general is an appalling enterprise. We, here in the UK have had various encounters with food fraud over the last little while. Products clearly labeled as beef, have contained horse, fish labeled as cod, which is an expensive fish, has been found to contain river cobbler instead, a much cheaper fish.

I believe that a container ought to contain what the package says it does. If it clearly says on the box that the cereal contains strawberry chunks, or raisins, or gooseberry or whatever, then that is what the cereal ought to contain. I also believe that IF GMO are being used in the product, then there ought to be a reference to that on the label.

However, if the box does not say that it contains the berry you assume it is talking about, then largely speaking you ought to think twice about buying it. If it fobs you off by saying "red berry" or similar ambiguities, then avoid it!

Food fraud specifically refers, to instances where a package which clearly states the contents on the side, actually contains something different to the stated contents. This appears to be a situation where a lack of good sense on the part of consumers, has lead to a product becoming popular which actually STATES on the box that actual berries are in no way present, and that is slightly different. The consumer pays for what the box states is in the food. If the consumer is prepared to pay for emulsifiers and petrochemical derivatives, and eat them too, then that is foolish of them, but breaks no law, and is not fraud.

If however the box states that it contains real pieces of wild berries for example, but actually contains crystallised BS that has never seen a plant in its life, let alone been part of one, then clearly something is awry.

However, reporting on matters such as these has to be accurate, and not sensationalised, because otherwise it leaves the producers of questionable products in the position where they can claim that their products have been lied about. Accuracy, and honesty on the part of reporters, not to mention rigorous methods and examinations of the produce in question, ought to be a primary consideration, before going to press, and those were absent, given what I have read.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 07:02 AM
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Aleister

Yes, the ads reel them in with funny cartoon hijinks and child-hooking tinkling music, and then the famous use of downward looking eyes on many of the breakfast "cereal" boxes (the eyes of the character on the box look down so the small child looking up sees their faux friends "looking" at them and they scream to mommy or daddy to buy the box for them), and then, the coup de mace....sugar. The sugar addicts these little kids the same as if you shot them up, and for years afterwards they poison themselves courtesy of their imaginary friends enticing them from the front of the box.


Mine are accustomed to a real breakfast, which I consider to be something as equally balanced as a dinner. They seldom have cereal, but when they do, a bowl is usually all it takes for them to lose interest in the entire box. A sweet cereal might sound good to them, but when they're used to eating a full meal with sufficient protein & fiber from multiple sources, their stomachs are going to protest, "This is NOT what belongs in here!" My elder kiddo is quite fond of Cascadian Farm's Ancient Grains & my younger's a huge fan of bran flakes. If they really want cereal, they gravitate towards the fiber oriented ones like those. Only once in a blue moon does something nasty sweet (nasty is just MHO) like Frosted Flakes get begged for anymore.

It really is a parental thing, like any other food. If you're letting the kids dictate what food gets purchased on a regular basis, you're kind of failing here. Taking suggestions from them is one thing, but letting them control the contents of your cupboards is a dietary fail in the long run.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 07:10 AM
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championoftruth
A lot of the products you buy may may claim it has various fruits in it,but an investigation has revealed large scale deception in such foods designed mislead to be deceptive.
Why is the FDA and the government not doing anything about it?





Why don't we hear about the wholesale fraud with "honey"? Why don't we hear about the wholesale fraud with olive oil? Why does corporate America fight GMO labeling?

Fascism is the merger of state and corporate power. BTW, the FDA is just another disaster in a long line of government failures.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 07:17 AM
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Oh my lord.

It is up to the Parent and the individuals to know what they are eating.

Of course the advertisers are going to "hook" you with words, pictures and "healthy" associations.

Not once in by 40+ years on this planet did I think Froot Loops had real fruit, Fruity Pebbles had Fruit or rocks in it, Honey Combs had honey in them...and the list goes on.

I swear to god, when did common sense about these things get replaced with ignorance? (ignorance meaning "lacking knowledge", I don't want anyone associating ignorance with being stupid...another huge misconception)

If you ever made the mistake in thinking that any cereal advertising fruit had real fruit in it and you didn't take it upon yourself to read the label, you deserve a mouth full of GMO and chemicals.

....everyone in T-ball gets a trophy....everyone gets to play....we are all winners.....BS



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 08:26 AM
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Even if it is real fruit, dehydrating the fruit can cause problems. If you examine ginger, a root full of chemistry that is good for us. If you dehydrate ginger it becomes ginger flavoring, used in ginger-ale. It has a few good properties that are in ginger but lacks many of the good properties that fresh ginger has. It is no longer ginger.

So I would rather add real fruit to my cereal. Small packages of blueberries are in the freezer to do things like this, real wild blueberries. Freezing the berries does still cause a few problems but it also has some benefits. That is another story.

Some of those real berries in cereal that are dried can break your teeth. By the time they soften, the cereal is mush.



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