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I'm excited about jury-duty. Am I crazy? Advice and experience on the matter sought.

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posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:04 PM
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I just received a summons for jury duty.

Now, most people see this as a nuisance. I must be some sort of mutant.
I'm excited, riveted, ecstatic to be part of the legal process, because I know that I myself am a just person.

I've had family caught up in the gears of the legal system. But I'm not gullible. You can look in a person's eyes and tell a lot about them.
I won't be swayed by fancy tricks by Johnny Cochran style lawyers.

I want to be a part of the court process, I want to help decide what is true, what is right, what is fair.
I am not a narcissist, no god complex here. Just a man who finally feels like he can contribute to a situation in which a person's life can be decided in the proper manner.

"Guilty or not guilty", that is the question. But I won't be one of those people who zone out in court. I'll be wide awake, coffee in hand.

I am eager and willing to be part of the jury process, as should every American. If I were on the jury of trial for the officers who beat Rodney King, even as a Caucasian, I'd have voted guilty. But I would have voted guilty on O.J. as well.

Now, I'm not sure what exactly they're summoning me for, but I want to increase my chances of being chosen for jury.

Does anyone have any advise? Any previous experience? Anything that could help me?

Seriously, I'm pretty psyched about finally having some manner of influence on the legal system.
I just wish I had been on my father's jury.




posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:08 PM
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You still have to now be selected to participate. The lawyers for each side get to interview you about your ideas and like your views on things...to see if either objects to letting you be on the jury. They have all kinds of reasons why to not let you.
edit on 09-22-2013 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


Congratulations on being summoned for your civic duty. Here are a few tips on what to expect....



10 things that jurors need to know
The judge in Vicky Pryce's trial dismissed the jury after their questions revealed they did not understand their task. So what do jurors need to know before they take on the duty? Here are 10 tips from someone who has done it in the past

www.theguardian.com...


Good luck...


Des



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 

Some of the reasons for not choosing you are wide and varied. For example, they may not want you for your religious views, political views, age, long or short hair, race, color, education, the jobs youve had, your past, your present....you name it, and if one or the other objects...youre out.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:12 PM
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mysterioustranger
You still have to now be selected to participate. The lawyers for each side get to interview you about your ideas and like your views on things...to see if either objects to letting you be on the jury. They have all kinds of reasons why to not let you.
edit on 09-22-2013 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)


I know. And I want to game that system, to get inside and do some actual good.

Both sides will try to mal-align me, to separate my viewpoint from reality...

But as someone said once, there are three sides to every story. Person A's side, Person B's side, and the truth.

And I want to be someone who makes their decision on the truth. Not on whether the defendant is black, or hispanic, or chinese, japanese, taiwanese, or any -ese.

If I have to lie, I'll lie. But I want to know what lies to tell to get on the jury. What questions to answer the right way to get included.

I'm un-employed, so the money is a thing for me, but the idea of truly being a co-arbiter in someone's potential freedom, or the putting away of someone who actually deserves is really appealing to me.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


Learn what jury nullification is, how to use it, and don't let the lawyers lie to you or intimidate you.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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A few more words of advice on Jury Duty....


Got jury duty? Follow these tips to make it more tolerable

www.dallasnews.com...


What to wear to get picked advice...


www.askandyaboutclothes.com...![/ ex]


Des



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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Here's a fun idea; bring this book in to read while you're waiting to be selected.

Jury Nullification: The Evolution of a Doctrine

Then sit back and wait to see how long it takes for them to throw you outta there. Bring a stopwatch and start it the second you pull the book out. My bet is you'll be tossed in under two minutes.



ETA: If you really want to get selected for jury duty do what I did the one time I got stuck with it; arrive late. When I went there, they picked prospective jurors in based on their time of arrival wit the last being picked first and the early birds picked last. I guess it was their way of punishing us for coming in late. The later you get there, the more likely you are to be chosen. The early birds come off as too eager and neither side wants that. If you want to get chosen, act like you don't want to get chosen, and whatever you do, do NOT mention jury nullification. If they think you're even aware of the term, they'll never let you serve. (I write it in big thick letters on every jury questionnaire and they always tell ne not to bother coming in)
edit on 2/27/14 by FortAnthem because:




posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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milk it for everything you can get and do not be too quick to make up your mind but try not to fall asleep and snore and report back to hq on what it was about

edit on 27-2-2014 by 999zxcv because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


If selected weigh the laws being applied to the case. If you think they are unfair, being used inappropriately or go against the Constitution then use your power to nullify.


Jury nullification occurs in a trial when a jury acquits a defendant they believe to be guilty of the charges against them. This may occur when members of the jury disagree with the law the defendant has been charged with breaking, or believe that the law should not be applied in that particular case. Jury Nullification

It's our greatest deterrent against a justice system run amok.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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OptimusSubprime
reply to post by Grifter42
 


Learn what jury nullification is, how to use it, and don't let the lawyers lie to you or intimidate you.


I appreciate the advice. As defined by wikipedia,


Jury nullification occurs in a trial when a jury acquits a defendant they believe to be guilty of the charges against them. This may occur when members of the jury disagree with the law the defendant has been charged with breaking, or believe that the law should not be applied in that particular case.


And if in that case, I will vigorously defend their rights if it be a victimless crime.

And I trust both sides of the case as much as I trust a water moccasin and a cobra. But I'll be damned if I don't go down to the wire trying to deliver my verdict on the side of the truth, and of actual fair justice and appropriate sentencing.

I want to be on a jury. I want to be the person who pays attention, doesn't read a book while the evidence is being presented, pays attention while the defense mounts their argument.

I want to be what an American should be, not what Americans have come to become. Fair and moral.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


Probably best not to wear your ATS Tee shirt on the day!

P



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


I was up for jury duty for yesterday and today. Where I am there is a number you call the night before to see if you must report, I didn't have to. Couldn't really afford the time off work anyway.

One thing they will bounce you out of there for is seeming to eager to be on a jury. Most people try to get out of it, so play it cool. Don't walk in like an eager puppy dog looking to play some fetch. Answer the questions truthfully, dress nice, be respectfull and you will likely get seated.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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Lawyers of both sides are probably reading this, or they will read its transcript and they will judge you on what you will say, and have said previously, here, or elsewhere on the web.

You have no ideas what they can learn on you in a short period of time... lol

And telling about your views like you do will help them decide if you will be helpful or a nuisance, and if you are already leaning toward a side or another.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 09:07 PM
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Does anyone have any advise? Any previous experience? Anything that could help me?
reply to post by Grifter42
 


I served on a jury, and I can tell you this, it was worth doing it just to see how the court system and jury deliberations work. You will find out that your verdict will way heavily on two things, the parameters in which you must find guilt for the particular crime, and how heavily "reasonable doubt" plays into your decision. You will find yourself asking questions like, why didn't the prosecution call a particular witness to testify, why wasn't a particular point discussed in length?

As far as deliberations go, stick to your guns. The people selected on the jury will have to pick a jury foremen. The foremen will have to help direct the deliberations and keep order. You will have other people on the jury trying to change your verdict. If you feel like your being pressured to change your verdict over what the evidence clearly showed or did not show, state your opinion and tell them you're still not convinced. Some jury members may just want to go home because they're getting tired of deliberating for hours or days on end. All I know, if my life was on the line, the last thing I would want a jury member to do is cave into pressure from other jurors.

Would I do it again? Not if I can decline it or be lucky enough not to be selected. You will come away understanding how jury's came to their decisions on cases that attracted media attention. Case in point, the Trayvon Martin case.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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Definitely use this as a learning experience.
My last time was a joke. The guy got drunk, then drove his car, ran from the police and wrecked, then resisted arrest.
We got to decide if he knew he had a suspended license. Wth? Who cares? I wasted my day for that.
Hopefully you will get a real trial.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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Most boring waste of time I had ever went through. They pay crap, don't want you to be in there very long so they can pay less, and you are usually picked because of your insight on the relationship, when it comes to job, character, or certain attributes, to the defendant. My case? GUESS. J.H.
edit on 2272014 by GiulXainx because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:24 AM
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I've only been called for jury duty once.
But it was one of the most interesting things that I have ever done!
The case wasn't much, but it was still a learning experience.

A guy who owned some apartments, somehow screwed the gas company.
I don't remember the details, it's been a few years.
Can't remember who's name the meter was in or anything.
But he was claiming the money wasn't his responsibility.

It was a lot of he said, they said, right up to the closing arguments.
Then, BAM! The gas company's lawyer said the guy had 'priors'!
I thought, whoa! Can they expose that nugget in the closing argument???
Apparently they could, because the guy's lawyer never objected!

That pretty much did it for the jury!
Anyone who was on the fence up 'til then, decided he was a conman!
The judge came in the jury room after the trial was over.
He thanked us, discussed some things & asked if we had any questions.
I asked about that 'nugget' that they threw in at the last minute.
He said it was allowed & that's one of the things that makes court interesting.
You never know how it's going to play out!

I had to drive to the next town as the courthouse is in the county seat.
There is no parking lot and not very many metered spaces on that block!
I found a little church parking lot that I used. It was empty on weekdays,
& I hoped they would be charitable enough not to have me towed!


We weren't given any parking or food allowance & there is no cafeteria.
The jury paired off & walked to one of the small restaurants nearby.
The whole jury walking into just one place at lunch time,
would have overwhelmed them, they were so small!

A couple of months after I served, I got a thank you note in the mail,
& a check for $7 for 2 days! And I had to declare it on my income taxes!
The amount stunk, but I would do it again.
The gas back & forth to the next town for 2 days was probably that much.
But at least it wasn't in the winter time!

I did take a book along & a notebook & pen, none was provided for us.
There was no TV, but we weren't in a waiting room, just seats along the hall.
Small town budgets versus big city ones I guess!

Every high school civics class, should have to sit in on a court case at least once!
So much better than the dry, boring way we were taught about the legal system!
In fact, I liked it so much & it was so interesting,
that I went back & sat in on a medical malpractice case the next week!
Now THAT was interesting!!!

Hope yours is too!
WOQ



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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wear a black hood and sit there sharpening an axe and practice tying a hangmans noose with a lenth of rope .. make sure its one of the good oldfashioned hemp ropes not one of the modern nylon ones ..



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 02:03 AM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


If you get selected, good luck!

Pay is horrible. Food can be a plus.

You'll probably be pressured to reach an agreement before you are ready.

Stick to your beliefs and act as if you were on trial! One day you may be.



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