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Tunguska Meteorite came from Mars?

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posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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New Amazing clues come from research about some fragments of the "object" of the Tunguska event. Spaceship? Comet? Meteorite? And if so from where it come? Recently, Andrei Zlobin of the Russian Academy of Sciences, made ​​a statement that he investigated the alleged fragments of the cosmic body that fell in the summer of 1908 over the Siberian taiga near Tunguska. Three hypothetical meteorite fragments were found about a quarter of a century ago at the river bed near the area of fall. Chemical analysis showed the presence of vitreous cortex and quartz that are generally extremely rare in meteorites.



english.pravda.ru...

In particular, the scientific group of Yana Anfinogenova of Tomsk State University studied the so-called John's Stone, a mysterious chip found in 1972 in a valley near Mount Stojkovic, the epicenter of the Tunguska explosion, named after its discoverer, scientist John Anfinogenov. In composition the stone was significantly different from other species present in the same area.

Until the fall of a large meteorite in the Chelyabinsk region near Lake Chebarkul in February of last year, most experts preferred the comet theory of the Tunguska explosion. It was supported by the absence of debris that could be convincingly attributed to the long-time event in the Tunguska. Recently, however, scientists have concluded that in the event of a meteorite presence of a crater and fragments is not a mandatory phenomenon. After that the meteor version once again became one of the "leading" ones in an attempt to explain the phenomenon of the Tunguska explosion.

In terms of chemical composition it is very similar to the fragments studied by Andrei Zlobin. The study revealed that John's Stone consisted mainly of sandstone grain about 0.5-1.5 cm in size. In terms of structure it resembles the samples that have been found recently on Mars. Earlier it was believed that there was no quartz on the Red Planet. When Zlobin announced the results of his research, Natalia Artemyeva with the Institute of Dynamics of Geospheres stated that "vitreous cortex or quartz did not exist in meteorites."


[...]The study of Anfinogenova's team raises as many questions as Zlobin's study does. From a fairly large number of meteorites of Martian origin present on Earth, there is not a single one coinciding with the composition of John's Stone.

[...] Surprisingly, three-quarters of Martian meteorites are composed of rocks that are almost never found on the Red Planet. They are much younger than the most common elements of the Martian surface. Since the area of ​​Mars is small, much smaller than that of the Earth, it is not clear where on the planet such young rocks should be sought.


Related Thread: Tunguska Event: The "Impactor" at the bottom of Lake Cheko!


onlinelibrary.wiley.com...

A major explosion occurred on 30 June 1908 in the Tunguska region of Siberia, causing the destruction of over 2,000 km2 of taiga; pressure and seismic waves detected as far as 1,000 km away; bright luminescence in the night skies of Northern Europe and Central Asia; and other unusual phenomena. This “Tunguska Event” is probably related to the impact with the Earth of a cosmic body that exploded about 5–10 km above ground, releasing in the atmosphere 10–15 Mton of energy. Fragments of the impacting body have never been found, and its nature (comet or asteroid) is still a matter of debate. We report here results from a magnetic and seismic reflection study of a small (∼500 m diameter) lake, Lake Cheko, located about 8 km NW of the inferred explosion epicenter, that was proposed to be an impact crater left by a fragment of the Tunguska Cosmic Body. Seismic reflection and magnetic data revealed a P wave velocity/magnetic anomaly close to the lake center, about 10 m below the lake floor; this anomaly is compatible with the presence of a buried stony object and supports the impact crater origin for Lake Cheko.


After one century, the science have no conclusive evidence of this mystery...

edit on 27-2-2014 by Arken because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 02:04 AM
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the electric universe theory would explain a lot about the scars on mars surface but the geology of yucutia region in siberia has puzzled many before and dr valarie ulverov has some interesting work on it as with the alleged couldrons there .

its a mystery



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 02:16 AM
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The addition of that first picture adds a cool element to this thread.



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 02:21 AM
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brazenalderpadrescorpio
The addition of that first picture adds a cool element to this thread.


That image for the "Mystery Mood..."



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 02:44 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


The general public readily accepts preliminary scientific explanations and is fast at adopting established views. Open questions remain in this case but the most likely scenario is welcome, whereas mysteries are considered a 'pesky burden'.

I can't really contribute much to what caused the Tunguska event or from where the meteorite (?) may have originated. One wonders, though, how long it took to get some answers after the 1908 incident. If it really came from Mars, displaying a different internal makeup than martian rocks (or meteorites) usually have, then some of the theories about what early Mars might have looked like, may be wrong.

Definitely an interesting thread ... thanks for diggin' this up, Arken!



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 07:17 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Always a good topic, and any new angle is interesting to read. I didn't realize that fragments of this monster had been confirmed (or nearly confirmed). With the newer exobiology craze of cutting into Martian meteorites to find signs of ancient life (food tracks and all), the folks who have control of those pieces better lock them up good before everyone comes along wanting a piece of the action.


edit on 27-2-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 07:23 AM
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brazenalderpadrescorpio
The addition of that first picture adds a cool element to this thread.

Many of my SF books have cool pictures, it doesn't make them science though



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 





Three hypothetical meteorite fragments were found about a quarter of a century ago at the river bed near the area of fall. Chemical analysis showed the presence of vitreous cortex and quartz that are generally extremely rare in meteorites.



Wouldn't the analysis that showed extremely rare to meteorite elements sort of dismiss the hypothetical idea that these are meteor fragments?

Is that what a hypothetical meteorite is, A rock suspected to a meteorite?



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