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Tiny Houses: A big idea to end homelessness

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posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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There's a new movement going on in a city near you these days. Places such as Austin, Los Angeles, and cities in Utah, all have programs in place where proponents are building micro living spaces for the homeless. Some build the houses from recycled parts, some build new, cheap houses with the aid of grants and donations.. I think this just might work and the dividends paid in crime reduction will be massive. Not to mention the savings on the medical infrastructure. I'm sure the benefits will be numerous; I'm just at a loss right now at some of the other benefits to society. What say you, ATS?


www.nbcnews.com...




posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I like the tiny house movement. But the article doesn't show what the houses are like in Wisconsin where it gets quite frigid. It shows what are basically boxes on wheels in California. Hell a backpack and a tent would be good there.

I think Park model homes are the way to go and they have everything you need.

Here is a company that builds them.

www.athensparkhomes.com...



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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I dont know it sound slike a good idea but looking at these "tiny house's". It is obviously better then nothing. But I mena are they not living effectively in a make shift dumbster. I mean again obviously that is better then nothing. Most homeless people I have contact with are not stupid just have a mental Illness. I dont know I just hope this doesnt turn around in way that mocks homeless people.
edit on 26-2-2014 by American-philosopher because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


Good point it is easier to live in the warmer climate area (well not to warm when you think of Texas and Arizona)

What about heating and thing's like that??



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


tthose are dog houses



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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They do like like dog houses. I also agree it is better than nothing but in this world everyone should have access to a roof, food, and heat. Perhaps populations would be more content if they did not have to compete for basic necessities.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by American-philosopher
 


I don't want a large place to live. But regulations in many cities and counties now demand it. It's frustrating. All I need is a roof over my head, a bathroom and small kitchenette. And i would like a garage as well. I've been designing houses over the past decade and it struck me that the garages are always bigger than the house. LOL

Well, I do live up north and am a guy, so I do require a place to tinker with things.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:23 PM
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There are many "homeless" who would never keep the utilities paid, or the toilet in working order, or even want to stay in one spot very long. The place would be destroyed in less than a year. A big cardboard box down by the river, with a blanket and a 12-pack or a pint of vodka or gin would make them happier--and maybe walking distance of the dumpster at BurgerKing.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:30 PM
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Awesome idea, l can see the ads now.
"Coming to the Downtown Core and Alleyways Soon, Your very own Mini-Slum".



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:33 PM
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Tusks
There are many "homeless" who would never keep the utilities paid, or the toilet in working order, or even want to stay in one spot very long. The place would be destroyed in less than a year. A big cardboard box down by the river, with a blanket and a 12-pack or a pint of vodka or gin would make them happier--and maybe walking distance of the dumpster at BurgerKing.


I know of some of those types. And that is why I am not against mental institutions. But there are plenty of folk out there who are struggling because, let's face it, life isn't fair. Maybe they don't have people skills, but they do have other skills that can be put to use, for the benefit of themselves and others.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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Cynic
Awesome idea, l can see the ads now.
"Coming to the Downtown Core and Alleyways Soon, Your very own Mini-Slum".


Why can't it be a Park Home community on the outskirts of town? Maybe a 1/4 acre per home? All these McMansions are a waste of time and money. I see it here where I live. A development sprang up a decade ago and now almost half the homes are for sale...and they're not selling, but rather being repossessed by the banks and still not selling.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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TDawgRex
reply to post by American-philosopher
 


I don't want a large place to live. But regulations in many cities and counties now demand it. It's frustrating. All I need is a roof over my head, a bathroom and small kitchenette. And i would like a garage as well. I've been designing houses over the past decade and it struck me that the garages are always bigger than the house. LOL

Well, I do live up north and am a guy, so I do require a place to tinker with things.


Regulations demand that you build big, not live big. My house is small and I have two nice size garages, all built in 1975 before the regulations happened. There are small ranchers all over with lots of land for garages. I wish I could post a picture for you of my neighbor's house; his garage is at least twice as big as his house (maybe he's you!) lol
Good luck on the house.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:41 PM
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My wife is all up on this "Minimalist " thing, I keep telling her she must think the word means something it doesn't, because she is by no means one.

Anyway shes been following tiny houses forever, their cool, smaller area to heat, so more energy efficient, small foot print, cheap, etc.

She actually got into the whole thing when went to Mexico to build basically tiny tiny houses for the poor, We would build shelters smaller than any tiny house I have seen yet and they would pack a surprising amount of people in them.

I could easily see this solution implemented here, cargo containers are abundant and a waste, no one wants to ship them back to china. So why not use them in cheep low-cost to no income housing.
edit on 26-2-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:49 PM
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benrl
I could easily see this solution implemented here, cargo containers are abundant and a waste, no one wants to ship them back to china. So why not use them in cheep low-cost to no income housing.
edit on 26-2-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)


Slap some Cedar siding on them, a bit of insulation on the inside, some plumbing and maybe a peaked roof and bada-bing, bada boom! You have a house. No one would know the difference other than it's small. It's actually happening in the way you describe all across the world.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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I think it is a great start. Give homeless people a secure shelter to sleep in and keep their belongings in. As well as recycling materials on top of it. A win/win.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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I think the consensus so far is that this is a good idea. I do have to wonder about theft, however. Do these mini houses come with keys? Are you able to tie them down so that other people can't just roll them down the street and take them from you? What about illegal activities and uses of these mini houses?

Don't get me wrong, I like this idea. I'm just looking at the other side of things.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:08 PM
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Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
I think it is a great start. Give homeless people a secure shelter to sleep in and keep their belongings in. As well as recycling materials on top of it. A win/win.


It's also good because with homeless people out of the elements, it can help stop the spread of sickness and disease.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I certainly think crime would be a concern, but not in the taking of the units type of way.

Id imagine that these would be placed together, and you would create a ghetto of sorts, It would be interesting to see to say the least what would result from something like this.

Id be interested to see what kind of difference long term this could do as well, IN mexico we built small houses like this. What we would see when we returned 1,2, years down the road to build more, was the first set of people had added to the home. Even going so far as to help others build similar homes.

This was in a poor migrant farming community, used only as farm labor most sleeping in tents, or very flimsy structures. There was a net benefit to the community as a whole. I wonder how that would reflect on an urban population as well, interesting food for thought.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:26 PM
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The sad thing is that some people's dogs live better than this in America. I cannot imagine living in something like that because I've seen deer stands better than that, fish houses better than that. Yet, we should be happy about this? It's a "viable" option for the homeless? The bar has certainly been set low and it makes me sad.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Here's the Elephant in the room......

Who is going to let a 10 of these micro homes in their OWN NEIGHBORHOOD? Right next to their own home.

Who is going to pay for the utilities for them?

Who is willing to let their property values fall? Would you buy a house adjacent to a small group of Homeless homes?

Who is willing to let their kids play in an area with 10 homeless people with mini homes?

Just being realistic here, even our local churches just shuttle the homeless from location to location because even they won't put up with a continued presence of homeless people in their localities.

You would have to put them up in places far from "normal" Suburban life.

Someone tell me I'm wrong..........





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