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I don't buy the modern American dream....

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posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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I realized today that my life would be much easier if i just gave up the American dream. I don't really buy into the whole idea of owning an amazing car, a big house a big piece of property. I have come to the conclusion that my life is much simpler and less stressful if i stop putting those "needs' on my list. I can make less money, have a less stressful "job" or small business, and just live a small simple life.

This is what ive come too. I no longer buy into the paradigm of success and fitting in socially.




posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Your post reminds me of a famous rant by one of the best comedians in the last century.....George Carlin. It helps to bring perspective and I go back to his stand-up from time to time just to get a taste of the truth.

Warning....cussing ahead!

George Carlin on the American Dream......



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 09:49 PM
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You're not alone in that, neither do I. As far as I'm concerned, you will always rent wherever you call home. The "American dream" of home ownership is a nicely re-phrased way of saying "renter". Sure, sure, you can always opt to stash your money for years and buy a residence outright with it and skip mortgages, bu you're still paying taxes. In my opinion, property taxes is merely a rental agreement from the government, since if you default on taxes, they can seize it & give you the boot. With that in mind, I won't busy myself with high anxiety about achieving this "home owner" status. We feel perfectly dandy as renters now, it's a place to sleep, eat & grow until we move to a different residence for whatever reason (an extra bathroom would be sweet, but isn't entirely necessary)

We also, by choice, don't own a personal vehicle. We live in an area with good public transit, and don't need a car. If we moved more rural, we would, but we're in an area where a little planning for transit and getting off our duffs and walking works just fine for getting around. We really have little desire to alter this. I guess you could say we subconsciously gave the "American dream" the middle finger years ago, lol.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


I never really chased that particular pipe dream in the first place. Seemed like a pointless waste of time, and not something I think is worth breaking my back and working myself to death over.

Buying crap and owning lots of crap has never been something I found worth pursuing. I have always tried to live minimally, with the basics: roof, functioning car, food, electricity, clothing, pet. Having free time to spend with people who matter, or to explore and discover neat things, has always been my end goal.

Chasing the "dream" also makes you a slave. You are a slave to your employers, a slave to your debt, a slave to fortune, a slave to a sick and self centered society. The less you have, the less you want, the more free you become.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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onequestion
I realized today that my life would be much easier if i just gave up the American dream. I don't really buy into the whole idea of owning an amazing car, a big house a big piece of property. I have come to the conclusion that my life is much simpler and less stressful if i stop putting those "needs' on my list. I can make less money, have a less stressful "job" or small business, and just live a small simple life.

This is what ive come too. I no longer buy into the paradigm of success and fitting in socially.


The American dream seems to be geared towards attracting people from other countries. If some one from a third world country saw what you have they would believe you are living the American dream......



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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It is an illusion...that is all it ever was, and is. It is good to see that you have awoken to that fact.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 10:31 PM
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The "American Dream" seems to have shifted to more and more conspicuous consumerism. Fancy car, the newest electronics, the gold plated phone plan, the big screen TV, 4,000 sqft homes. Blech. We're well enough off here, house is 2/3rds paid off (though you're correct about taxes - I, too, argue that you can never, ever actually own your property in the face of property taxes). 2 paid off decade old cars that run fine and look decent. Kids have brand name clothing - from the thrift store. We kept to the "old" rule of 2.5 times your salary for a house though we were heavily encouraged to borrow much more.

I'll have *my* version of the Dream as long as I have my family, a roof over our heads and enough to support the kids. Toss in opportunities for my children (well, there goes the dream...) and I'd be one satisfied, boring person.

I had a friend in high school who was valedictorian. His speech was unique - it was titled "Enough". It was about being happy with "enough". It made a big impact on my life and the decisions I made. I feel it kept me and mine out of financial problems and bad career decisions. I need to track him down and see if he still has it so my daughter can read it.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Good for you, if more people can focus on needs over wants then I believe more will find peace and happiness.

It's not easy but keep up that type of attitude. S&f



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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You haven't given up the American "dream", you've tossed aside the American nightmare. You'll find yourself blessed for that decision. That "dream" presented so frequently by the advertising cartels will catapult you right into slavery. I prefer the original American dream of freedom and of pursuing your passions and happiness.
I spent eight long years attempting to fit into the "live beyond your means" crowd, to have the latest of everything, and the more in debt we were, the more stress I felt. When my then unemployed husband (now ex, still unemployed) drained our daughter's college savings account to buy a bass boat because the credit cards were maxed out---I tossed him out. I never looked back, it took me three years working up to three jobs to get those suckers paid off but I did it and swore that I would never, ever again live beyond my means and create that kind of stress in my life.
Fortune smiled on me when I met my current husband and found that he shared that philosophy. We've shared, so far, almost thirty-one years of happiness and a few rough patches. I hope you will be similarly blessed.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 





I realized today that my life would be much easier if i just gave up the American dream. I don't really buy into the whole idea of owning an amazing car, a big house a big piece of property. I have come to the conclusion that my life is much simpler and less stressful if i stop putting those "needs' on my list. I can make less money, have a less stressful "job" or small business, and just live a small simple life.


Same here man. I pretty much gave up on the dream of owning my own brand new house, and the dream of finally owning some car that's worth $30,000 + a couple years ago.

Im happy with living in a modest apartment, or renting or buying an older home, and driving a car that's worth only $5,000 up to $10,000.

ETA - A few other things worth mentioning.... I do have a debit card, but Ive never had a credit card and never really plan to. Having a credit card seems basically like a trap waiting to happen. Also, (aside from video games), I don't seek out the most popular electronics anymore. Ive never had an Iphone, or any kind of touch screen phone. The phone I currently have is about 7-8 years old, and Im happy with it. I don't really care about all those "apps" or whatever out there for phones. As long as I can call or text, that's all I need in a phone. Last thing - I wear the same clothes that Ive had for years. Some are 10 years old and they still look good and fit me fine. If I ever go buy new clothes, I make sure to buy cheap. $40 + for a shirt or pants is just a crazy price for me.
edit on 24-2-2014 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


And you live in Palm Beach ?????
Move to Dickinson North Dakota if you're into simplicity



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 05:42 AM
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Morning,

I agree with Carlin on this one...



"The Owners know the truth...It's called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it."

(S+F)

-Peace-



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 06:58 AM
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G'day , we have had a special programme on television, here in Australia , just last week on the band INXS .
One of their songs called ORIGINAL SIN was apparently not well received by whomever PTB in America and goes like this,
"Dream on white boy Dream on black girl and wake up to a brand new day to find your dreams have washed away.

When I heard that this had not been well received ,the song stood out even more ( INXS fan) and is sort of stuck in my head blast lol
The writer was on the ball then and trying to point it out.
It's been in my head and then I saw your thread . cheers 1%



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 07:46 AM
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I've had this life philosophy since I was in the military. When I got out of the military, I saw all these people getting all worked up over the most inconsequential things. To me, none of it is important and people waste too much energy worrying about things that don't matter. Of course this means they become ill prepared when they need to worry about things that DO matter and become useless when the chips are down.



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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What exactly is the modern American dream?

I dont think people aim for the same things they did when the phrase was first coined.









 
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