Is It Really Genetic? ….Should Your Bloodline End Now?

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posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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It's well-known that protein mutations can and do occur without DNA changes, and can be inherited, but the Eugenics-Genetics campaign keeps pushing the old paradigm - "It's all genetic." Revealing close ties to global industry, one of Eugenics-Genetics main goals is to distract attention from the real causes of disease, many of which arise from our environment.

Researchers from the University of Finland challenge the genetic interpretation of biology, and present a proposal based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics to reformulate the Eugenics-Genetics foundation.


A challenge to the genetic interpretation of biology

A proposal for reformulating the foundations of biology, based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics and which is in sharp contrast to the prevailing genetic view, is published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface under the title "Genes without prominence: a reappraisal of the foundations of biology".

…the prominent emphasis currently given to the gene in biology is based on a flawed interpretation of experimental genetics and should be replaced by more fundamental considerations of how the cell utilises energy. There are far-reaching implications, both in research and for the current strategy in many countries to develop personalised medicine based on genome-wide sequencing.

to assume that genes are unavoidable influences on our health and behaviour will distract attention from the real causes of disease, many of which arise from our environment;

the current strategy towards basing healthcare on genome-wide sequencing, so called "personalised healthcare", will prove costly and ineffective.


What is personalised health care?

This is the idea that it will be possible to predict at birth, by determining the total DNA sequence (genome-wide sequence), health outcomes in the future and take preventive measures. Most European countries have research programmes in this and in the UK a pilot study with 100,000 participants is underway.



Bottom line: It's NOT genetic, and if you go along with this fiction, imho, you'll end up on a list of useless eaters slated for euthanasia and extinction.





edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


OP I'm not exactly sure where you're going with this but this bit here...


…to assume that genes are unavoidable influences on our health and behaviour will distract attention from the real causes of disease, many of which arise from our environment


I think all of the above *Genes, Behavior and Environment* are all contributing factors. Which one to the higher degree? I think that's really a crap shoot. Although if I had a family history of Heart disease then Smoking two packs a day and 7 or more trips a week to the local greasy burger joint should be avoided.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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Since gene expression is and may well be for a long time, beyond the realm of science,
basing health care on genetics, would be without doubt, flawed and even dangerous



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Bottom line: It's NOT genetic
What's "not genetic?" Are you saying that genetics have no influence on health and behavior?


This process consumes energy and is therefore governed by the 2nd law, but also by the environment in which the folding takes place. These two factors mean that there is no causal relationship between the original gene coding sequence and the biological activity of the protein.
phys.org...

So...genes have nothing to do with anything. The proteins which define life just sort of happen. Interesting hypothesis.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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It's always a pain in the ass when I hear people living with unhealthy obesity and saying: 'What could I do anyway, it's all about genetics'.
I've seen many people recovering from huge weight by using their will only. Physical exercise + eating healthy. That's the key, no genetics involved.

I also suspect some diseases to be willingly manipulated by the same people that pretend to protect us. But who really knows, when you live in a world where everything is suspected of inducing cancer.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 12:47 PM
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Might be a better idea to look into the behaviors that our PARASITES engender in us.....
But im no doctor................
it seems we have little control of ourselves on many levels....
edit on 22-2-2014 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


family history


Family history implies inherited, but inherited does not necessarily mean genetic - protein mutations can be and are inherited without genetic mutations (or DNA mutations). It's called epigenetic inheritance.


ED to ADD: re

*Genes, Behavior and Environment* are all contributing factors.


[Strictly speaking, behaviour constitutes environment.] The old paradigm says our genes determine most everything about us - but it's closer to the truth to say our environmental exposures determine our genes' expression. Back to the OS/software distinction.










edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: wd
edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


So...genes have nothing to do with anything. The proteins which define life just sort of happen.


Consider DNA the OS and epigenetic influences to be software. The proteins which define life can and do mutate without DNA mutation - it's called epigenetic. Mutated proteins can be inherited, again without DNA mutation (epigenetic inheritance) but is not permanent, unlike inherited DNA mutations.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 




Family history implies inherited, but inherited does not necessarily mean genetic - protein mutations can be and are inherited without genetic mutations (or DNA mutations). It's called epigenetic inheritance.

Epigenetic inheritance does not really involve DNA mutation. It is the addition of "markers" to DNA, not changes to the genes. It is a phenomenon separate and distinct from DNA mutation, both of which occur and are inheritable. Both of which have effects on genetic expression.
www.epialliance.org.au...

But are you saying that epigentics does have health and behavioral outcomes? If that were the case it would seem to be in conflict with your OP. Since epigentics affect gene expression you would seem to be saying that gene expression does indeed have something to do with inherited traits and therefore health and behavior.
edit on 2/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 




The proteins which define life can and do mutate without DNA mutation - it's called epigenetic.

Epigentics determines genetic expression. It determines how, when, and if genes produce proteins.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:24 PM
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Phage
reply to post by soficrow
 






Epigenetic inheritance does not really involve DNA mutation. It is the addition of "markers" to DNA, not changes to the genes. It is a phenomenon separate and distinct from DNA mutation, both of which occur and are inheritable. Both of which have effects on genetic expression.
www.epialliance.org.au...


That's pretty much exactly what I said. "Family history implies inherited, but inherited does not necessarily mean genetic - protein mutations can be and are inherited without genetic mutations (or DNA mutations). It's called epigenetic inheritance." Are you playing some kind of game here?



But are you saying that epigentics does have health and behavioral outcomes? If that were the case it would seem to be in conflict with your OP. Since epigentics affect gene expression you would seem to be saying that gene expression does indeed have something to do with inherited traits and therefore health and behavior.


I'm saying environmental exposures can and do determine gene expression - and override DNA programming to change the protein and its function. Epigenetics is all about override.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:26 PM
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Phage
reply to post by soficrow
 




The proteins which define life can and do mutate without DNA mutation - it's called epigenetic.

Epigentics determines genetic expression. It determines how, when, and if genes produce proteins.


Epigenetics can override genetic programming, and change the protein that was programmed for production.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Soon it will be a war of the genes... The Elite will create a "super-human" and all of our specie, full of "impurities", will be considered an "enemy to evolution".



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Are you playing some kind of game here?
No. I'm saying that gene expression is a matter of inheritance and is a result of both genetics and epigentics.



Epigenetics is all about override.
Yes, epigenetics affects some gene expression.

And without genes, there is no genetic expression to talk about. So, it is a matter of genetic inheritance.

 


Epigenetics can override genetic programming, and change the protein that was programmed for production.

I agree. But the article in the OP seems to be saying that gene expression doesn't have much to do with it. It's all about, "how the cell utilises energy."
edit on 2/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


When we eat foods that we have not yet acquired the genetic instructions to process correctly, both the food and the chemicals created by the consumption of the food, we wind up with changes to the gene expression or we need another food or chemistry to neutralize the chemistry that is created.

There is no genetic flaws, just a difference based on the eating habits of our ancestors and the subconscious knowledge of how to neutralize the toxins created. This comes in the form of cravings.

We are not flawed just because we cannot correctly metabolize the reconditioned food that science created. They have changed most of the chemistry in our food in the last 50 years. Some chemicals necessary for us have been lost because of the desire for foods that grow big.

Seems that the people in charge of this are in la-la land, blind to anything other than research they can earn a living off of. People say to eat organic heritage food don't make money off of this, but even they do not realize the extent of the problems we are seeing.



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


RE: Epigenetics is all about override.

Yes, epigenetics affects some gene expression.

And without genes, there is no genetic expression to talk about. So, it is a matter of genetic inheritance.


Like our different cells do, we all share the same genes yet are unique and often hugely different. Generally, these differences do NOT arise from genetic difference or genetic mutations - they arise from environmental influences, often minute and subtle - epigenetics. By definition, an epigenetic system should be heritable, self-perpetuating, and reversible (in response to environmental change).

Epigenetics is generally accepted as "resulting from external rather than genetic influences." Or more scientifically, as "the study of changes in gene function that are mitotically and/or meiotically heritable and that do not entail a change in DNA sequence."


The cells in a multicellular organism have nominally identical DNA sequences (and therefore the same genetic instruction sets), yet maintain different terminal phenotypes. This nongenetic cellular memory, which records developmental and environmental cues (and alternative cell states in unicellular organisms), is the basis of epi-(above)–genetics.

The lack of identified genetic determinants that fully explain the heritability of complex traits, and the inability to pinpoint causative genetic effects in some complex diseases, suggest possible epigenetic explanations for this missing information. This growing interest, along with the desire to understand the “deprogramming” of differentiated cells into pluripotent/totipotent states, has led to “epigenetic” becoming shorthand for many regulatory systems involving DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome location, or noncoding RNA. This is to be encouraged, but the labeling of nongenetic systems as epigenetic by default has the potential to confuse (see the related video at www.sciencemag.org/special/epigenetics/).

So what is epigenetics? An epigenetic system should be heritable, self-perpetuating, and reversible (Bonasio et al., p. 612).


Epigenetics literally means "above" or "on top of" genetics. It refers to external modifications to DNA that turn genes "on" or "off." These modifications do not change the DNA sequence, but instead, they affect how cells "read" genes.

Epigenetic inheritance

It may be possible to pass down epigenetic changes to future generations if the changes occur in sperm or egg cells. Most epigenetic changes that occur in sperm and egg cells get erased when the two combine to form a fertilized egg, in a process called "reprogramming." This reprogramming allows the cells of the fetus to "start from scratch" and make their own epigenetic changes. But scientists think some of the epigenetic changes in parents' sperm and egg cells may avoid the reprogramming process, and make it through to the next generation. If this is true, things like the food a person eats before they conceive could affect their future child. However, this has not been proven in people.



RE: Epigenetics can override genetic programming, and change the protein that was programmed for production.

I agree. But the article in the OP seems to be saying that gene expression doesn't have much to do with it. It's all about, "how the cell utilises energy."


DNA is the "mechanism" for genetic activity and inheritance; the 2nd law of thermodynamics, and the environment in which the folding takes place are the "mechanisms" for epigenetic activity and inheritance. Two difference processes with different mechanisms.


When a gene, a string of bases on the DNA molecule, is deployed, it is first transcribed and then translated into a peptide – a string of amino acids. To give rise to biological properties it needs to "fold" into a protein.

This process consumes energy and is therefore governed by the 2nd law, but also by the environment in which the folding takes place. These two factors mean that there is no causal relationship between the original gene coding sequence and the biological activity of the protein.






edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: oops
edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: format



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


When we eat foods that we have not yet acquired the genetic instructions to process correctly


You consistently support the Eugenics-Genetics paradigm - and I consistently disagree. We have about 20,000 genes - nowhere near enough to handle all the "instructions" required for life and living. "Genetics" is not the answer or the explanation.

I have NO DOUBT the huge range of "modern diseases" that appeared over the past half century have everything to do with environmental contaminations and dickall to do with "genetics." By any sleight of mental gymnastics.




edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


we all share the same genes yet are unique and often hugely different.
We share the same genes but those genes are not all the same. Variations within a gene result in differences between people. A variation within the HERC2 gene causes people to have blue eyes. We all have the gene but we don't all have blue eyes.
genetics.thetech.org...



"the study of changes in gene function that are mitotically and/or meiotically heritable and that do not entail a change in DNA sequence."

Yes. Gene function. Genetic function.
edit on 2/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Variations within a gene result in differences between people.


Gene variations do not come anywhere near explaining the vast array of individual difference.



"the study of changes in gene function that are mitotically and/or meiotically heritable and that do not entail a change in DNA sequence."

Yes. Gene function. Genetic function.


I don't get what you're trying to say here.





edit on 22/2/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 




Gene variations do not come anywhere near explaining the vast array of individual difference.

According to whom?
3.2 billion base pairs making up 20,000 genes. That's an average of 160,000 base pairs per gene. Of course, some gene sequences are longer than others but that's room for a vast array of differences.

Then you can start taking into account that many of those 20,000 genes affect the expression of other genes (which in turn affect others). Lots of room for a wide variety.

I wonder, if all our genes are the same. How can an individual be identified by their DNA?



I don't get what you're trying to say here.
I'm saying that variations caused by epigenetics are still based on genetics. Your OP says that they aren't. Your OP says that they are based on "how the cell utilises energy."
edit on 2/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)





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