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Would the Isolation make you go Insane

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posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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i did a few months of living in an empty construction trailor in the bushrecently
boredom and moral turned out to be critical factors

its a good thing i had an amfm shortwave radio, and some knowledge of some obscure medicinal plants...

there is no substitute for good company, especially if there has been a big trauma




posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 10:54 PM
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overanocean
reply to post by 999zxcv
 


By all means , if you need to take a blow up companion called Sally feel free.
Do what you got to do.
and you can stick her in the cupboard with no nagging when not needed

ps sally has a friend called wendy for those long winters in alaska

she opens bottles with her mouth 2



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 11:07 PM
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As long as I had heaps of imaginary friends then I coul'dnt want more. Of course its when they start fighting amongst themselves and plotting to kill me thast I worry a bit. But apart frpm that the polar bears come around for tea and the caribous arnt bad neighbours. : )



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 11:39 PM
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Having lived alone in the forest for two years I would say its definitely not for everyone.
If you're an introvert and have no need for human socialization at all you will be ok.

The beginning few weeks are the hardest but once you get camp set up just the way you want and you get your food stores in
order it gets more comfortable but never really easier. Theres always wood to gather and game to catch plus all your day to day chores to keep you occupied until its time to wind down but even then you will be less busy making finer things inside until you decide to sleep.



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 11:40 PM
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cosmicexplorer
reply to post by Raivan31
 


Lets change it a bit...how about no human contact..but I can have the internet...I find I feel more socialized through online chatting than actual human contact these days...so im pretty sure I could...im actually a highly social guy...but im very solitary too...my best times are when im alone...and most contact I have is through the internet.


I can speak to this one from personal experience. You start to feel very lonely. but you do have outlets.
You'd find yourself trying to look at the same stars that your online friend is to feel closer to them.

It's a humbling experience as well, you'll get really introspective and depending on what kind of personaility you have that could lead to bad places.

Time will also become a far less concrete concept for you as well, entire days will go by and feel like an hour, and sometimes it'll work the other way around.

Being in touch with yourself will make a massive difference on how well you handle. Self knowledge ya know.



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 11:47 PM
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EyesOpenMouthShut
Having lived alone in the forest for two years I would say its definitely not for everyone.


Was that the time that you tried to kil Arnie? (predator reference hahaha)



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 11:59 PM
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Pretty sure I heard of this guy on that tv show flying wild alaska. The guy did seem a little off his rocker but had a nice little setup in the middle of nowhere. I would love it but would need at least some of my kids to keep me company, perhaps when I am old and they have moved out and did their own thing in life but not in the here and now...



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 12:01 AM
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One summer i was the caretaker at a remote mine in Nevada.

Two months with no one else there.

I am a nudist so i did not have to run to town to do laundry.

Got a nice tan.

Just a trip to town every two weeks for food and mail.

The mine was completely off grid with a Pelton wheel generator and sat TV even a wood fired hot tub.



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 12:35 AM
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Prefer to stay far from people and "civilization" these days .. getting where my annual trips downriver are getting shorter .. easy to keep busy between taking care of garden , fishing , practice martial arts , meditate . Have tab 3 that use to go online and see whats going on in the world .I enjoy my solitude and not having to deal with the idiocy that runs rampant in "civilization" .



posted on Feb, 20 2014 @ 06:52 AM
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As I recall from my experience that was way down the list of priorities. Not freezing to death or falling down and getting injured was the main constant issue. Too many other things to worry about.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by overanocean
 


A lot of younger people here have never known life without social media, a cell phone, internet and whatever else that keeps you connected...that would be tough for that crowd to adjust once it all goes down, and it will be comical to see the ones that have became a slave to the system of techy things...
A lot of those people, not all but most of them are lazy and worthless...they don't know what a hard days work is..
Again not all of them but most of them.
I personally love being out for weeks at a time without the day to day crap most go through...I grew up going up into Canada ..way up north, seeing the northern lights, very few hours if any of dark...low light yes, but dark...no.
Fishing, camping, hiking, and all the fun things about being outdoors is what I did...yes my dad was there to and grandpa...mom and grandma sometimes came up too..It was for several weeks at a time, and we really had to rough it...meaning taking a cold bath in the lake, cooking everything outdoors...the only indoors we had was our vehicle and a tent..and we did this for 2-3 weeks at a time..I loved it..it would even snow on us in June/July up there...it was awesome
I have also done that many times over the last few years alone, and it was great, I would stay out if I did not have responsibilities...
edit on 24-2-2014 by saltdog because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by saltdog
 


Well written. The situation I was in for about 40 straight days and nights my only concern was being alive to see the next day. It's an overwhelming load on a persons mind-and being isolated, alone or without conversation never entered the picture whatsoever. What sleep I got-very little-I had issues with debilitating visions about all the limestone caves in the area that just frightened me silly.

This was 23 years ago but I still remember the horrible nightmares about the caves that just tortured what little sleep I got.

Just to reiterate not having 'conversation' or someone else around was totally irrelevant. That is why persons who have never been placed in a situation like that just don't understand how 'real wilderness survival is mental in the extreme' The biggest battle you will face is with yourself. You can't train or 'prep' for anything like that.

One other thing. I decided to undergo hypnosis later to get to the bottom of the cave visions however I was just a bad candidate for hypnosis and could never be 'leveled' is the word they used.

edit on 24-2-2014 by spooky24 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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In my late teens I spent two weeks alone in a semi-arid wilderness in the desert southwest of the USA. I lived in a cave, and walked about a mile and a half to a windmill. There was a dirt road beyond the horizon, and when the wind died down (practically never), you could hear 3 pickup trucks driving on the road, as ranchers went out to check their cattle.

I've been to some great rock-n-roll concerts back the day, but nothing tops a thunderstorm brought on by a super cell in the desert.

Your baseline state of consciousness, and thus your personality, is a response to the input from your environment. The habit of talking to yourself is a habit you develop to maintain that normal state of consciousness, and it comes to the fore when you are no longer getting input from society. It is emotional masturbation, giving yourself the input you miss from culture.

Shutting off the internal dialogue, even momentarily, shifts you into an altered state of consciousness. Normally, when you are immersed in culture, there is little impact to your over-all personality, since it's purely temporary. You'd usually describe it as a "moment of clarity", of heightened awareness. It happens, particularly when hunting. Interestingly, an accomplished hunter who taught me to hunt told me that white-tailed deer can literally "hear you thinking," and that you are seldom successful as long as you are "thinking with words." A thought-provoking theory.

At any rate, shutting off the internal dialogue (i.e., stop talking to yourself) has interesting enough effects in your normal setting of being immersed in society. When it is practiced after days or even hours of solitude, the effects are far more profound. Once you stop talking to yourself, and with no one else around helping you to maintain your normal state of consciousness, curious things begin to happen.

From a materialist/psychological point of view, and observer would say that you are "making up" foreign entities to converse with. The view of primal peoples would simply be that you have begun to "listen to the voices of the outer world." Their test for voracity is merely whether those outer voices provide useful information that aids in survival---location of water, game, or sources of danger. A Fortean would claim that the individual subconsciously realized where the water or game or danger was, and "invented a voice" to inform the conscious mind of the critical information.

At any rate, the phenomenon of the "vision quest" is not isolated to Native American cultures, but was species-wide in homo sapiens until the advent of farming. It is recorded in instances among the Altai Shamans of Siberia, the viking tribes of Scandanavia (Odin's ordeal impaled on the world-tree), and the ancient Hebrews (Genesis 32:24-31, 1 Kings 19:9-15). John the Baptist lived permanently in the desert, and only entered civilization to preach (Matthew 3:1-3), and Jesus went on what could be called a vision quest as soon as he had been baptized by John (Matthew 4:1-2)

The danger of that solitude, of "listening to the voices of the outer world" is the same as the danger with any mind-altering stimulus: it brings out what is already latent within you.

all the best



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 07:04 AM
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The danger of that solitude, of "listening to the voices of the outer world" is the same as the danger with any mind-altering stimulus: it brings out what is already latent within you.


That is a good explanation and I agree. Your "listening to the voices of the outer world" only occurred when I was sleeping-or dozing-is a better description of it.

My problem was a 100 year ice storm had coated everything in ice and it was so dangerous just to walk 10 feet. I guess what your saying is it's somewhat normal to replace conversation with your own personal 'input' and that input can bring out fears that were just below the surface.

I'm wondering if that is within the context of what you are saying?

Some of the limestone caves here are endless. Mammoth cave starts in northeastern central Tennessee. I was always taught that in survival situation caves should be avoided because of the danger of hypothermia-that you can get in a cave in the middle of the summer. Also, any kind of fire in a cave can reduce the amount of oxygen to breath and most of all your field of vision is reduced to one dimension and I would prefer to be able to see what is all around me.

I had good shelter. Still I have never understood why I had such debilitating visions about the caves-I was never scared of them before.

If you want to elaborate more on this I would be interested in reading it-I have never understood my mental breakdown however it was short lived because the pressures of staying alive drove me much more than my lack of sleep and horrible visions.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 08:42 AM
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I would be too concerned about illness, injury, and bear attacks to worry about too much isolation.

To want to be completely alone in the wilderness, any wilderness, is to have a death wish.

We are prosocial animals precisely because we aren't good at going it alone.

Ask poor Steve Fosset...

Sorry, you can't - he's been dead for 6 years.

His plane crashed in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California in September 2007.

It's thought that he died in the crash, but no one can be really sure.

It's been speculated that the crash wasn't what killed him, that he was only injured by it.

And that he may have trekked several miles in his injured state to get to a good vantage point where air rescuers could more easily spot him.

But he was never found alive, and he would have had a pretty good inkling that it wasn't going to end well for him.

Already injured, exposure, hunger, and thirst would have taken their toll.



posted on Feb, 26 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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spooky24

My problem was a 100 year ice storm had coated everything in ice and it was so dangerous just to walk 10 feet. I guess what your saying is it's somewhat normal to replace conversation with your own personal 'input' and that input can bring out fears that were just below the surface.

I'm wondering if that is within the context of what you are saying?


Yes. That is the first response, almost universally. Only over time, or given unique circumstances, will a person ever cease the internal dialogue. But it sounds like you had something else going on.



I had good shelter. Still I have never understood why I had such debilitating visions about the caves-I was never scared of them before.

If you want to elaborate more on this I would be interested in reading it-I have never understood my mental breakdown however it was short lived because the pressures of staying alive drove me much more than my lack of sleep and horrible visions.


Were you INSIDE the cave, or did you just have nightmares about nearby caves???



posted on Feb, 27 2014 @ 06:44 AM
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It's been so long ago but I remember it would be about 40 days before anyone knew where I was-that was done purposely-however the danger of even the slightest injury-from falling on the ice was a constant worry.

I had made an extensive study of the area. The natives, settlers and the solders all had their own take on limestone caves-especially the ones that go for miles and miles underground then have openings that you must crawl through to get back to the surface. They all had the same fear-that is you lose your ability to understand direction-mainly up and down-and it is so easy to get lost.

If you have ever been to Mammoth cave-which is at least 120 miles long underground-you get the feeling of weightlessness and confusion in the very big rooms. To the settlers this was know as the same psychological breakdown that effects hunters-buck ager. Quite simply, a psychological loss of control, that confused persons and got them to worsen their situation by not being logical-and coming out the way they came.

Neither the Union or Confederacy would have anything to do with the caves-they stored nothing in them-and stayed out of them for the same reason the Indians and settlers feared them-buck-ager -Basically, you would lose you wits, get lost, and die a horrible death lost in a cave.

I knew all this however I was not scared of the caves because I knew was not going to step one one foot in any of them. I constantly had visions of being lost in one of them-not nightmares-visions-when I would doze off.

Again, the pressure of staying alive allotted most of this fear, as I had things I had to get done and that has a calming effect. My wood and coal piles were a distance away and getting to them and back without getting injured had a way of making me concentrate.

I never understood the visions-that is why I tried hypnosis. I remember receiving acupuncture years later and it was so relaxing I would think about the caves.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 05:24 AM
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I have heard this argument so many times over the years, people saying human beings are social and cannot function without others around them, well that might apply to some but some of us would not only survive but thrive on our own, I was brought up as an "only" child and spent many years on my own both man and boy and I can truthfully say in a post collapse event I would prefer to be on my own, away from all other people and would be most happy that way with just the animals and nature .



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 05:33 AM
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After a while the Animals, Birds etc around you would get used to you and you would be surprised how many would eventually eat from your hand or use you as a source of food, and i dont mean eat you, though this could be a possibility.

I'll take the friendship of Animals over humans any day of the week.
Maaayn, I talk to myself all the time, i find it's the only way i can get an intelligent answer to my questions.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:34 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol yeah i'll take animals over humans any day.




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