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I only see satellites in the hot seasons.

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posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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For the past couple years, I have been kinda of noticing that I only see satellites in the spring and summer mainly. I hardly get to see satellites in the fall and hardly at all in the winter time.

It been bugging me somewhat, cause I could see satellites very easily some nights in the spring, the most at once was three at a time.

Also, isn't easier to see bright objects in the sky at winter time? I do notice the stars get more brighter, maybe due to the air being heavier since it cold.

Any thoughts?




posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:32 PM
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Southern Hemisphere, or Northern Hemisphere?

There could be more wood burning fireplaces active in your area during winter which could muck up the atmosphere a bit?
Any heavy Industry in your area could very well muck up the atmosphere more during cold seasons as well.

That's all I got.




posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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You happen to be outside more in the warm season, thus you see more satellites.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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It could be to do with the position the sun is in at that time of year and its different reflections off it?



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:35 PM
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its going to be the atmosphere changes that are going to fog up some seasons.

I never see it clearer than in a still, warm, summer night.

The clarity falls of rapidly with cool moisture in the air.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by Specimen
 


You gave us no idea of your outside time in the summer, spring and fall to the dead of winter. More than likely, you spend more time in looking at four walls in the winter. But as to visibility, yes, far better in cooler times.

But you know, satellites, and UFOs (as far as we can guess) don't operate seasonally. there should be as many out there in January as there is in July.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:40 PM
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With the angle of the sun down to the south, the satellites don't reflect the light to a location as well. In the summer up here, the satellites kind of disappear after about twelve thirty because of this. The earth blocks the sunlight but allows light to hit the satellite till that time which makes them shine. Now when the sun is far south, the reflection may not be visible from the north but may still be visible from southern USA. Only about two and a half hours after dark.

I suppose a few hours before daylight they may also be visible. I never paid attention to the morning satellite viewing. I researched this years ago because I wondered why they couldn't be seen after 12 or so. My dad told me that they disappeared after midnight when I was a kid, I think his explanation was that they went to sleep and I should also be sleeping at that time. I kind of like his explanation better.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by AliceBleachWhite
 


Northern and yea, there is some heavy industry close by.

I just find it odd that the some stars and planets are brighter in the sky.
edit on 17-2-2014 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by Sandcastler
 


Idrk. True, Im not going to be out as much as the summertime, but I still go outside for certain periods of time in the winter. I just find them to much more predominant in the spring and summer.

Plus, night is much longer in the winter time obviously.
edit on 17-2-2014 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Thats a good explanation.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by Specimen
 


Specimen, what's your latitude? It's quite true that the 'twilight period' for satellite visibility lasts longer in summer in northern latitudes, sometimes all night long. It's because the sun doesn't 'drop' below the horizon straight down, it sort of 'sidles' behind it and takes a lot longer to be low enough that Earth's shadow creeps up to orbital altitude. Get a globe and flashlight and play with this until you're convinced.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by Sandcastler
 


Nailed it



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by JimOberg
 


My latitude is 43.6833° N, and I think I have a globe somewhere, just don't remember where it is. If not, I ll buy one, and it probably be a good decoration.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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Specimen
reply to post by AliceBleachWhite
 


Northern and yea, there is some heavy industry close by.

I just find it odd that the some stars and planets are brighter in the sky.
edit on 17-2-2014 by Specimen because: (no reason given)


Is this just random viewing or do you view on a schedule?


edit on 18-2-2014 by InhaleExhale because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by InhaleExhale
 


Random. Most of my sightings of satellites are usually random, even though they are kind of hard to spot sometimes. Especially if you live in an urban area mixed with industry, houses, and a few large nature parks.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 10:35 AM
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Specimen
reply to post by InhaleExhale
 


Random. Most of my sightings of satellites are usually random, even though they are kind of hard to spot sometimes. Especially if you live in an urban area mixed with industry, houses, and a few large nature parks.


I live in Melbourne, Australia

Much light pollution around the city centre and a fair bit in the suburbs from street lights.

I view randomly as well and the only answer that springs to mind is you are not synchronizing your random times in a way to catch a passing satellite, meaning if at randoms times you go out to view it might be more numerous at warmer times and be for longer periods than you would view when its cold out so you are simply just missing them at the times you go out to have a look.

They are always there, yes in winter the sky above Melbourne if clear and not much atmospheric interference passing satellites, planets and stars seem a little more vivid.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by Specimen
 


The main reason as Jim suggested earlier is because the Sun sinks lower below the horizon in winter than it does in summer, and this is all due to Earth's tilt.

Software like Sellarium will show you what is going on if you try comparing the seasons, and it will even tell you what parts of the sky are in Earth's shadow(if I remember correctly) as well as showing you visible satellites.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 11:20 PM
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FireballStorm
reply to post by Specimen
 


The main reason as Jim suggested earlier is because the Sun sinks lower below the horizon in winter than it does in summer, and this is all due to Earth's tilt.


Precisely, and I just thought of a way to demonstrate this. Go to heavens-above.com for satellite visibility predictions and register your location, and ask for visibility of ISS, say. Then register by lat/long with the latitude changed sign. Winter here, summer there. Over time there ought to be more sighting opportunities in 'summer'. Since we are approaching the equinox [march 21] the asymmetry probably isn't very pronounced. but near mid-winter, say December, it might be evident.




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