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Moon Fly-Over 4K Test.

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posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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Moon Fly-Over 4K Test.
Equipment used ;

The $old 11" Celestron, but i am able to do this also with the 8" telescope, and Canon 550D.
Note; this is more editing software to get this angle of attack
( sony vegas ) Enjoy






posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by Bosb33r
 


The video raises so many questions in my mind about the moon and its real and true history. Do we have video of the dark side of the moon?



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by antar
 




There is no other dark side of the Moon.

edit on 2/17/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:08 PM
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Bosb33r
Moon Fly-Over 4K Test.
Equipment used ;

The $old 11" Celestron, but i am able to do this also with the 8" telescope, and Canon 550D.
Note; this is more editing software to get this angle of attack
( sony vegas ) Enjoy









cool !
noticed that moon base go by @ 30 secs.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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Phage
reply to post by antar
 



www.youtube.com...

There is no "dark side of the Moon."






Pink Floydd would beg to differ.








oops saw yer youtube vid after sorry. mods take this BS down, Please?
edit on 17-2-2014 by thishereguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by thishereguy
 

You didn't click the link, did you?



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


no sir , i didn't.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by Bosb33r
 


I tried a Youtube video at 4k resolution once, it gave me the "blue screen of death".

Great video, but I do wonder about the brown colour that is seen in almost every telescopic video of the Moon. What is it cause by?

Here's a screenie from your video, with colours normalised in Photoshop:




posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 





Here's a screenie from your video, with colours normalised in Photoshop:


Why would that need to be done?

I'm trying to learn something by asking this. I don't see why an image captured on cam through a scope would give "abnormal" colors.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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antar
reply to post by Bosb33r
 


The video raises so many questions in my mind about the moon and its real and true history. Do we have video of the dark side of the moon?


First of all, as other have pointed out, there is no "dark side" of the Moon (Pink Floyd Music notwithstanding). The far side of the Moon always faces away from earth, but it gets just as much sunlight as the other parts of the Moon. For example, during a "New Moon" as seen from Earth, the entire near side of the Moon (the side facing Earth) is facing away from the Sun, and thus is in darkness, but the entire far side is facing the sun, and is lit up by the Sun.

Anyway, there are videos and picture of the far side of the Moon. Here are some videos; this first one is from Apollo 10 as it orbited around the back of the Moon, with an Earthrise as it came around toward the near side.


and a video shot by the Japanese "Kaguya" probe


edit on 2/17/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


oooh...i bet you were literally itching to post that again!


Thanks for the impressive video OP, i'm grabbing it right now to keep.




posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


The further away an object is, the more it's colour fades out.

I think the distance for loss of colour of the Earth is about 60,000 miles, although don't hold me to that.

When this far away, the Earth is mostly just white, not blue.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by thishereguy
 


What? No I didn't see any base. Are you feeling ok?



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 02:57 PM
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DenyObfuscation
reply to post by wildespace
 





Here's a screenie from your video, with colours normalised in Photoshop:


Why would that need to be done?

I'm trying to learn something by asking this. I don't see why an image captured on cam through a scope would give "abnormal" colors.

But have you noticed how the Moon looks brown in the OP's video? It obviously doesn't appear like that to the naked eye (or in binoculars), unless it's very low on the horizon. Perhaps the OP did film it low on the horizon. But if he didn't, I'd like to know what causes this brown colouration.

The Moon is mostly grey, with subtle hues of blue and reddish due to varying mineral content. The image I posted aims to reflect that.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by AutumnWitch657
 


lol, was having fun, there.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Some colors can can be attributed to our atmosphere, others can come from lens of cameras.

So I did not see that big ufo that is supposed to be parked up there lol...

The Bot



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Sooooo true... gonna have to listen to some Floyd now


Knew you were a smart guy...



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 06:21 AM
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MysterX
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


The further away an object is, the more it's colour fades out.

I think the distance for loss of colour of the Earth is about 60,000 miles, although don't hold me to that.

When this far away, the Earth is mostly just white, not blue.



BULL AND INDEED S&*T do you just make things up for the sake of it



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 06:41 AM
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MysterX
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


The further away an object is, the more it's colour fades out.

I think the distance for loss of colour of the Earth is about 60,000 miles, although don't hold me to that.

When this far away, the Earth is mostly just white, not blue.



You might want to rethink that statement.

Color is the different wave length of the electromagnetic energy we call "light".



The brightness of that light can fade with distance, but if the light is at a wavelength to show the color green, it will still be green.

Even at almost 2,000 lightyears away, the pink in Orion's Nebula can be see (with a camera, this one film, not our eyes, as it's too dim):



Go out in the night sky and look up at Mars with your eyes: it will look orangish red, even though it's tens of millions of miles away.

So it's the intensity of the light....and our eyes. However, if you gather enough of the light (IE use a camera with a long enough exposure) and there is color there, you'll see it.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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MysterX
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


The further away an object is, the more it's colour fades out.

I think the distance for loss of colour of the Earth is about 60,000 miles, although don't hold me to that.

When this far away, the Earth is mostly just white, not blue.


Colour doesn't fade out with distance. The whitish appearance of Earth in long-distance shots might be due to the cloud coverage, and due to the Earth's high brightness washing out blue colours in low-res images.

Here's a photo of Earth from Moon's orbit (the Moon is approximately 250,000 mi from Earth), taken by Apollo 8 astronauts:


From the same photo, cropped, rotated, and sharpened:






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