Meditation for the Living

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posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 12:32 AM
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Meditation for the Living

 



1.


Every experience I’ve had with any sort of so-called “meditation”, where I’ve been told to perform it in a sort of ritualistic fashion while being still and focused of breath and thought and muscle in a controlled way of doing nothing, and with the sort of magical Hollywood way they represent it in the media with gongs and sunsets and the whole nine-yards, one thing stood out to me: “meditation” is boring—and as they try to get it in schools, in the corporate workplace with all its religious overtones, infesting in the minds of the insatiable young—“meditation” is becoming an institution.

Upon mentioning my qualms to whoever would listen, everyone told me I must be doing it wrong, and on basis of divine authority, denied my reasoning. But, in my mind, it was they who were doing it wrong. I mean who am I to tell a life-long practitioner of this exercise that he’s not making the most of moments, but it all seemed a simple trick to tame an already docile creature, which, according to the popularity of “meditation” nowadays, seems to work well on a culture already addicted to escapism.

But step back and look at these people on their knees, eyes closed, perched like parodies of plants, meditating in a group-setting but with rarely a sign of life in the whole place. Is this experience? Is this mindful? Or is it retirement, an early bedtime, a plant with withering leaves?


As it is sold in the west, it appears to be a temporary resignation, a pharmaceutical drug, a fad diet, or a placebo. It is self-hypnotism; not a cure for the disillusion of life, but its mere antidote for a variety of symptoms. It is no wonder that there is a need for this quick fix. People need a break from the rat-race they find themselves in, but only so that they can quickly pick up from where they left off, after that brief moment they were, however slightly, concerned with something more important.

2.


Of course, meditation will never become an institution, and it cannot be limited by the way one talks about it, or the way one practices it, with rules and piety and strict methods and celebrity endorsements—or the most insidious of insults— how spiritual one is. It is a God-given right to every thinking being and is indeed a fundamental method to his good health—to think deeply, to contemplate, to be mindful of himself as an individual within his surroundings, no matter what other individuals would tell him are the proper settings, moods, positions and techniques for doing so.

3.


Sure, sit, relax, don a monk’s poise, don’t forget your posture, and, luckily for you, that man has offered to play a sitar for you only enhancing your peaceful state; or maybe, if that sounds too boring, find yourself somewhere you’ve never been, go outside, take a walk, look around, discover something, climb a mountain, kayak a river, make love, make merriment and make the most of every moment, always learning, always swimming, matching wits with the current rather than letting it take us where it pleases.

5.


We always get better at what we do, and maybe getting better at sitting isn’t for me, but in all my waking moments, you will never find me not meditating.

5.


How do you meditate?
edit on 15-2-2014 by Aphorism because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 02:13 AM
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Aphorism
We always get better at what we do, and maybe getting better at sitting isn’t for me, but in all my waking moments, you will never find me not meditating.

Can you explain what you mean by 'meditating' in the above statement?

edit on 15-2-2014 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


It's sad that meditation has not worked for you the way it has intended, the reason I got into Buddhism was because I was shocked at how much meditation changed my life.

I used to be quite into my... illegal candy, I was also lazy and perhaps just a bit of a womaniser. I'm not saying I directly believe meditation to be the single cause of my life turning around, but it certainly made it very very easy. The first thing I noticed was how much motivation it gave me, like after a session of meditation I would instantly want to get up, and clean my house from top to bottom. I also stopped needing to sleep with women to actually be happy and I stopped needing... candy to be happy.

I wanted to change the way things were which is why I turned to meditation and it gave me the motivation to actually do it. It is a very good way to fight depression, anxiety and a lack of motivation. It is even considered a medical treatment for people with mental illnesses like, depression, panic attacks and anxiety attacks.

On top of that, twice now, I have had out of body experiences. Experiences that have made me see the world in a different way, I've felt the connection that all living beings possess inside of us, how every living thing is meant to work in union. This wasn't something someone else told me to believe, or led me onto, this was me, discovering these things for myself inside my own mind. It can be a deep, humbling experience and I wouldn't trade it for the world.

If meditation isn't working for you, maybe it's because you don't need it? Perhaps you're already motivated, perhaps you already have a sound mind. One thing I will add is that it takes a force of will and a regular routine before you can enter the trance state I have needed to have experiences like this. The way the Buddha describes it is like the string of an instrument, too lax and the string doesn't sound true, too tight and the string doesn't sound true, somewhere in between and you can make a master-piece. This is called the Middle Way. I'm not going to say you're doing it wrong, but you may want to think on that since not enough effort will get boring, I have personally nearly fallen asleep before because I wasn't in the right frame of mind and I didn't put in enough effort.

The two that I do are the Mettā Bhavana and the Midfulness of Breathing, one is to help you have a nicer disposition towards other people and the other is the one that can blast me into the unknown parts of my mind.

I am sorry that it has not worked for you, but we all find peace and tranquillity our own way, it would be silly to assume that meditation is for everyone.

Mettā ~

ETA: Also, you will know if you have reached a true state of meditation, because your eyes will instinctively point into your third eye and your breathing will slow to an alarming rate (although you do not feel alarmed at the time). You can not force these things, or stop them, they just happen.
edit on 15-2-2014 by iRoyalty because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


Meditation is the art of becoming more like a perfect simple animal. It is the art of being, sure there are many ways that incorporate physical movement like yogas, and even some that are centered around thought. But really it has to do with being simpler of mind like animals, dealing with just the simple fact of existing, getting back to that ground state. Cows are quite good at meditating. Cats can meditate for a while but they are also very grounded in survival if you know how startled and scardy they can get. I imagine a deer often meditates when eating leaves in the woods it calls its home. Meditation is finding peace amidst the conflict/chaos, creating stillness, order amongst disorder. Computers meditate when they go to screensaver.

edit on 15-2-2014 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by iRoyalty
 


Thanks for sharing.

I have spent much time meditating according to Buddhist and Yogic schools, and I realize its benefits. It works for many people. I just think its boring. And I think it works more on a type of person who, I'm afraid to say, doesn't get out and enjoy life much. I don't have interest in it, its religious overtones are deafening, and would rather create my own way of meditation that includes a sort of enjoyment and excitement with life and health. Along with a good-nights rest, I can achieve the same level of focus, relaxation, and health through what I would say are more enjoyable activities, like painting, like writing, like extreme sports, like going to nature. In these situation, I can accomplish the same level of focus on the moment, silence of mind, breathing and muscle control, and health.

Anyways, I was hoping there was a few people out there like this, who meditate during every activity.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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Aphorism
reply to post by iRoyalty
 


Thanks for sharing.

I have spent much time meditating according to Buddhist and Yogic schools, and I realize its benefits. It works for many people. I just think its boring. And I think it works more on a type of person who, I'm afraid to say, doesn't get out and enjoy life much. I don't have interest in it, its religious overtones are deafening, and would rather create my own way of meditation that includes a sort of enjoyment and excitement with life and health. Along with a good-nights rest, I can achieve the same level of focus, relaxation, and health through what I would say are more enjoyable activities, like painting, like writing, like extreme sports, like going to nature. In these situation, I can accomplish the same level of focus on the moment, silence of mind, breathing and muscle control, and health.

Anyways, I was hoping there was a few people out there like this, who meditate during every activity.


I find very deep meditation fulfilling, but I can also meditate for up to six hours straight while releasing my soul into an oil painting, but that is a different type of fulfillment but still a meditative state to me. So, how do we rate meditation benefits to an activity, or non-activity? I suppose one must explore many meditative states and explore.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


meditation to me is Being in the moment
when eating just eating
when sitting just sitting
etc

peace



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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I ask my self the same question when I do a meditation. I used to be heavy into chakra meditation, but they are kind of double edged sword in their practice. Sometimes, I could focus on a region of my body(Like my heart) and I would feel awesome. However, at other times, I would feel pain in the area, or lately, even feel my heart skip a beat cause of that focus. I wonder if this is a symptom of kundalini syndrome, where one strains their mind by trying to focus.

I ended finding out the chakra meditations might end up being done a little differently. I would let myself try to get to the most relaxed state I can get myself in, and I would actually force my will(or chi) up my spine, much like the chakras, but with out focusing on the spot, just the region of that chakra, just letting it flow like it had a mind of it own.

However, when I try to do the force of will thingy when I'm not in meditative state, I can give my self some bad head pains.

All, in all, the best meditations where the one that just let me be in the present moment inside my self, where I can feel my lungs and nose needing less air to consume as I try to go deeper in meditation.

I have been lazy in my meditation practices for the past little while though.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 

Maybe you think everyone who is not doing it your way is doing it wrong, no matter what it is.

But, in my mind, it was they who were doing it wrong.

What are you seeking?


edit on 15-2-2014 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by Itisnowagain
 





Maybe you think everyone who is not doing it your way is doing it wrong, no matter what it is.


Yes. Seeing something as wrong is purely subjective conclusion. To them, it was I who was doing it wrong, and the same could be said for them.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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People should talk to eachother about what they are meditating upon. I guess sitting like that is only necessary until one has found how to meditate. Meditation is for gaining knowledge and answers and to get to know the reality of "things".

What do you meditate upon? Meditate upon the ways of God! Who knows what you will find? Share the answers you found because of meditation. Enlighten the masses!

"The meditation of a fool is foolishness"

To meditate you must be relax. I guess some positions encourage to become relaxed. I have no problem meditating. I do it a lot. It's like it almost became a way of life. One can't share his realisations with everybody though, some are caught up in the world. You don't need to hate me for saying that, it's the truth. Some are just not "connected".
edit on 15-2-2014 by oktopus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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I lie on my back on my bed when I meditate. Sometimes I fall asleep and wake myself up snoring. Sometimes I have great physical experiences , sometimes I get bored and examine the feeling of boredom. It's always an interesting experience in my opinion. Well worth having in my life than not. I value it. It is working for lots of people with depression in this country.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


whatever each of Us do, does not matter, imho
and i think it is wise to choose what works best for self growth
but of course whatever others choose to do in the end has nothing to do with self growth
while it is true that what others do may appear 'boring', if we can, we better not waste our energy worrying about them.

imho, activities like drawing, writing, etc are awesome.
i also draw and write, btw
going to nature? that rocks! walking in woods is fun!
doing these activities wholeheartedly is Meditation.

Who says that Meditation must be done with Lotus Position? Even Bowel Movement is also a form of Meditation when is experienced Wholeheartedly!


peace
edit on 15-2-2014 by dodol because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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double post.
edit on 15-2-2014 by dodol because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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[
edit on 15-2-2014 by Visitor2012 because: No need for my post



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 02:31 AM
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To me meditation is simply putting yourself in the most open state of mind possible. This allows you to process thoughts without your conscious mind judging the thought like we do in our "normal" stressed everyday lives. Then at some point you discover how the universe always provides and you start becoming extremely grateful for everything in your life. After this you are bound to be extremely positive at almost all times and will view life through a positive lens.

blog.ted.com...



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


I'm all with you that making every living moment your meditation is where it's at! I do find that quiet sitting is fantastic as 'training wheels' for this. Sometimes (probably just after levelling up, hehe) the intensity of the curve balls life is throwing makes me lose my inner poise. The hours of sitting meditation has instilled a habit of noticing this quite quickly. Often I find it then most useful to turn up my 'formal' meditation practice until that again spills over into my daily activities and I can elegantly do everything that I do (including deep thinking) in a mindful state.

Another thing: Boring. Go look at it carefully from all sides. It's a devious meme that easily traps you. Undefined it. Sitting meditation is an ok place to do that. I find meditating while cleaning or washing dishes a more furtile space to get to the bottom of it. Every moment is special. Once you can experience the profound beauty in even the most repetitive thing, excessive your disc reason and spend time on the most appropriate option. Until then, the recurrence of 'boring' things keep coming as this is a key lesson to learn.

I found that the experience of 'wow time is rushing past, its Christmas and seems like new year was yesterday' has become completely alien to me since slaying the 'boring' dragon. (bad expression. Poor dragons
every day is rich beyond measure if I keep my mindfulness. The moment I notice that pattern, I go back to sitting meditation as I need the training wheels again.



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by Aphorism
 


Have you ever seen Jimi Hendrix play the American Anthem.



Meditation is about putting your "heart and soul into it". It is about the most profound experience in relation to your thoughts as to why you exist.



edit on 16-2-2014 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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Id say that sitting might not be for everyone.

I sit for a bit right before going to bed. I always thought it was simply a nice way to end the day.





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