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Save a turkey this year - have tofu "turkey" instead.

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posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:18 PM
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Once again, it is time to blow the dust off one of my all-time favorite threads... Yes, my guilty pleasure of thread necromancy, gastric excess and oenophilia...

Added to the Mirthful One's Thanksgiving Day routine is the Moscow Mule and is particularly favored by Grandma Me, but all imbibe early, as it is refreshing and goes well with football...

Turkey, Ham and a protein to be name later will grace the Mirthful table...




posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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How do you make a tofu turkey?

First burn down the rain forest ......

Where do you think soya comes from? At least turkey farmers arent destroying any more of our environment or directly responsible for climate change and the extinction of myriads of species every year.




posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:35 PM
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Tofurkey? Ew. I love tofu myself despite eating meat, but tofurkey is one of those faux meat deals that has never been done right thus far, it's simply an awful facsimile. Well, no, it's not even a facsimile, tofurkey is a clear miss. Unlike veg chicken subs, veg beef subs, this is one of those meat substitutes that I don't think can be done as of yet.

However, don't worry, we don't be sacrificing a turkey this Thanksgiving. For starters, I hate turkey, it's not my cup of meat eater tea. Two, we don't really bother with Thanksgiving as it is. So it'll just be a normal meal for us, like chicken or burgers or something.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:36 PM
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Too late. The birds are harvested and on the way to or in stores now. No use wasting them.

Start earlier.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: Mynaeris

Did you know that if we didn't eat turkey, none of those turkeys would have any reason to exist and indeed could not even perpetuate themselves because of how they have been bred?

Indeed, they, like domesticated corn, need human intervention in order to propagate. So in order for the domesticate turkey to have any place in life at all ... I will be eating my turkey this year.

Also, domesticated turkeys are so stupid they are prone to drowning themselves by looking up during a rainstorm.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
Too late. The birds are harvested and on the way to or in stores now. No use wasting them.

Start earlier.

Pretty much this. Personally, I think if anyone wants to cut down the overall amount of a particular meat type eaten on a holiday, they have to start a whole lot earlier than a mere few weeks ahead of time. Like, upwards of 6 months earlier, depending on how long the farm raises them before they head to slaughter. Otherwise, it's literally is a waste, and the animals were slaughtered for nothing if they just sit somewhere frozen until disposal. I mean, it would be fabulous if we just grew/reared just enough for what we need, but we do it in excess in the States.
Hrm. On reflection, it's a nice idea to start trying to back people off around May/June, but they're still going to be hatching those eggs either way... It could work, but would take a year-round active effort for several years, and as those vegetarian/vegan efforts go, no one's going to listen with the prevalent PETA holier-than-thou attitudes anyway.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Also, domesticated turkeys are so stupid they are prone to drowning themselves by looking up during a rainstorm.


My parents ran a farm when I was really little. We had turkeys, they were friendly enough animals, but I remember them being incredibly stupid birds. We did lose 2 to drowning in the rain, it's no myth.

Edit: One we had, Tom (yeah, original, huh?) almost drowned in their water pan. I don't know if he was mentally challenged to begin with, but my mom always said he was much different afterward in a mentally handicapped sense, "he got worse" was her opinion. We kept him for years afterward, something about his idiot feathered butt resonated with us, he became more of a pet than anything. We did eventually eat him for Thanksgiving one year when we moved south & no one wanted to take him in.
edit on 11/6/2014 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Yeah, if we had the space, I'd like to do a grow my own on some things like poultry and eggs. I think vegetables would be harder because the maintenance on gardens is much tougher although with enough hens the pest control can be cut down I hear.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Big time help, ever since we got Lavern and Shirley we have not seen one scorpion in our yard and that alone has saved us a bunch of money plus free tastier eggs.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: thesaneone

Which brings up the interesting dichotomy... Wild turkeys (the bird in the wild, not the booze), eat a protein rich diet of insects, while farm raised turkeys (like what you buy in the store) are fed grains and corn, a carbohydrate rich diet.

Wild turkey has small breasts, while farm raised turkeys are ready for the Spearmint Rhino...

Just an observation, but I could use a turkey or two in my yard...



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Mirthful Me

But what is hunting season down there? Up here it's in the spring. Figure that one out.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: intrepidMost states that I'm licensed in have two turkey seasons, one spring, one fall...

Montana has some incredible turkey hunting... I've seen a parade of wild turkeys that had several hundred bearded gobblers in it's ranks... Amazing...





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