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Stress causes mental disorders?

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posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by alienreality
 


Well, true, but the whole point of the thread was that stress causes physical permanent changes in your brain that trigger mental disorders later in life even after the stress factor is removed. I guess I should have made the point more clear, I was sort of trusting people to read the article. I personally always thought stress was only related to temporary changes in brain chemistry not changes in geometry or physical configuration. Well, you always learn something new.




posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by TatTvamAsi
 


I read the article. Think it's an assumption that the changes are permanent. This seems to be epigenetics controlling the stem cell differences. It seems we can reset epigenetic shifts over time.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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TatTvamAsi
reply to post by alienreality
 


Well, true, but the whole point of the thread was that stress causes physical permanent changes in your brain that trigger mental disorders later in life even after the stress factor is removed. I guess I should have made the point more clear, I was sort of trusting people to read the article. I personally always thought stress was only related to temporary changes in brain chemistry not changes in geometry or physical configuration. Well, you always learn something new.


Sorry, I was just responding to someone's statement about the stress in organisms from overcrowding, etc.. And the toll it takes is usually a quick demise. In that situation I suppose the stress was still there, so it doesn't fit the op example..

I have seen the permanent things stress can do, it conditions quite a few things physiologically in a bad way for sure, and sometimes I forget how bad stress can be, to allow it to even be there. I Usually tell myself that stress and worry simply will not help make a situation become better and that I shouldn't give a flying f anyways.. Then I tell myself "in a century, who's gonna care?"
Works for me

But it also shows that stress in the past has left it's mark in my psychological make up, although not really negative too much..
edit on 12-2-2014 by alienreality because: add



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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webedoomed
reply to post by TatTvamAsi
 


I read the article. Think it's an assumption that the changes are permanent. This seems to be epigenetics controlling the stem cell differences. It seems we can reset epigenetic shifts over time.


It doesn't necessarily even need to be on so fundamental level as genetics. We can shift our neurochemistry with conscious and conscientious effort, no gene-switching necessary. However, it takes time, effort and consistency, but it can be done; with more stable results, with fewer unforeseen side effects than many of the pharmaceutical offerings available.

Please note, that I think that epigenetics are fascinating, and the role they may have in behavior could open up entire horizons in terms of human development and personality development. If we can get a better road map for how that works than absolutely I think that "epigenetic therapy "may be a new sub-field within professional mental health and the key to helping us as a species cope with the over-stress in our environment.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by redhorse
 


So I agree with everything you said, and am going to continue on with my intuition of how this operates. Putting all the pieces together.

First off, I think neurochemistry is far more fluid and dynamic than we seem to want to admit to right now. It seems that may be due to the chemical imbalance label pushed by big pharma monies.

So I think by sheer will alone, we can change our neurochemistry in the moment. Over time, this can reshape our minds ie neuroplasticity. I think once the will is removed, it depends on epigenetic markers shifting to stick.

So one is immediate, the next is intermediate, and the third is advanced.

It also seems the reverse can come about through extreme experiences, ie trauma. We can have epigenetic shifts from events lasting mere seconds to longer durations. This leads to reshaping of our minds, which may seem to override our will and result in neurochemical imbalances.

The key would be to allow stressors to guide our life's evolution, while constanty reassessing how the quality of life is being shaped, and provide energy for the will to fine tune the process, else do a major overhaul in the event of PTSD-like symptoms.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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webedoomed
reply to post by redhorse
 




So I think by sheer will alone, we can change our neurochemistry in the moment. Over time, this can reshape our minds ie neuroplasticity. I think once the will is removed, it depends on epigenetic markers shifting to stick.

So one is immediate, the next is intermediate, and the third is advanced.



My intuition largely agrees with yours. Neuroplasticity is exactly what I was talking about. However, I think we may find that there are some things where epigenetics may not be applicable. I think with some genetic predispositions that largely manifest behaviorally, such as schizophrenia, neuroplasticity and even epigenetics will only go so far. However, even with things like autism, and the schizoid spectrum in general I think neuroplasticity and epigenetics can certainly have a role in at least mitigating some of the more disruptive and negative aspects.

But as far as how we respond to and cope with stress, you bet; I just loved your description and I think it would be particularly apt here: immediate, intermediate and advanced.
edit on 12-2-2014 by redhorse because: period instead of comma



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