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Phrases People Use Wrong

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posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 05:32 AM
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8675309jenny

Hoosierdaddy71
I hate when somebody says cold slaw. Cole slaw dammit!


Kohl = German for cabbage


That's funny, kohl is something I put on my eyes, its a cosmetic...

Germans, going around eating kohl while the rest of the world wears it!

edit on 15-2-2014 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by AutumnWitch657
 

You're both wrong.
The word is "pastime", though the dictionary gives "pass+time" as the origin.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 07:49 AM
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reply to post by EyesOpenMouthShut
 


How about "same , same but different " Used in Thailand a lot

Quite funny actually - "tongue in cheek"

Hope it does not cause you a seizure .



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:26 AM
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AutumnWitch657


And you couldn't pull the word aluminum out of her mouth her tongue just couldn't wrap around it.









LOL! .... Where are you from? must be the US because that one always amuses me!

The English say *aluminIum* where as the Americans say *aluminium*



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 08:50 AM
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AutumnWitch657

kalunom
"My favorite pass time...."

Aaaaarrrgh!


PAST PAST PAST


Sorry but it is pass time as in your favorite way to pass time. Not past time
Pass pass pass


If I had written as you did, my 'favorite way to pass time", then yes, that would be correct. I wrote "My favorite pass time" (something I often see) - which is incorrect. I refer to the correct wording of pastime, as in a hobby.



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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My ex would purposely (I think) drive me nuts by pulling food from the freezer and proclaiming she was going to "dethaw" it.

Why would you want to freeze it again?



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:14 PM
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Someone used a "wench" to lift a dead deer onto their truck's hood in another thread.

I assume they meant "winch," but maybe not...


EDIT: And in the OP's Title... isn't it supposed to be "Phrases Used WrongLY" (or incorrectly)?

Not that I don't screw up all the time, and perhaps you did that ironically? That's the route I'd go, anyway... irony! (Iron knee)
edit on 2/15/2014 by Baddogma because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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Baddogma
Someone used a "wench" to lift a dead deer onto their truck's hood in another thread.

I assume they meant "winch," but maybe not...





LOL!!. . .

NO I think they meant a 'wrench'



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 05:41 AM
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Those sound more like 'american typos' than 'phrases that people USE wrong'. They probably still _USE_ them correctly, they just don't know how to SPELL the WORDS in them correctly. So you are actually using a MISLEADING TOPIC.

What the heck are American Typos?

Well, here is a list - but you might be shocked after you go through it - people are a lot stupider than I used to give them credit for, this list is 100% proof of it:

americantypo.site11.com...

(But BEWARE! It's like a big, rusted door that has been closed for centuries - once you open it, it's impossible to close it again..)



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 05:43 AM
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I just remembered one phrase people can't seem to get right:

"I could careless!"

The correct form, of course, is:

"I couldn't care less!"

(It can even be found amidst the 'american typos', in multiple versions - it's just so common that I thought I'd mention it)



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 05:51 AM
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OK, here is a genuine phrase example which I've noticed in conversation;
The confusion between "on his part" (= "did it himself") and "on his behalf" (= "somebody else did it for him").
So the standard wrong usage is "That was a sudden burst of anger on his behalf".
While a more correct usage might be "He noticed that somebody was being bullied and got very angry on their behalf- which explains the sudden burst of anger on his part".




edit on 16-2-2014 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 01:37 PM
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My sister forever gets the words lend and borrow confused. Despite correcting her for decades she is still incapable of understanding where she is going wrong.

"My bad" - the idiots way of saying "I am an idiot"

And then there is a plethora of sports fans who get the words "lose" confused with "loose" when spellig it.


"Nuff said like"
edit on 16/2/14 by mirageman because: spelling




posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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mirageman
My sister forever get the words lend and borrow confused.

I first encountered this in London, so I thought it was a London thing ("I want to loan some money, so I need to find someone to borrow it to me"). Am i right?



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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DISRAELI

mirageman
My sister forever get the words lend and borrow confused.

I first encountered this in London, so I thought it was a London thing ("I want to loan some money, so I need to find someone to borrow it to me"). Am i right?


She's possibly been watching too much Eastenders but we are from the North West.



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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I always misspell the word certainly as certaintly because I pronounce it Sir-tent-ly. I know it's wrong, but I can't help myself.



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by eletheia
 


Winch is right, used to pull things to what ever it is attached to



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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eletheia

AutumnWitch657


And you couldn't pull the word aluminum out of her mouth her tongue just couldn't wrap around it.









LOL! .... Where are you from? must be the US because that one always amuses me!

The English say *aluminIum* where as the Americans say *aluminium*



I believe the American pronunciation is correct and that we Brits changed it somewhere down the line.

However the one that always gets me is the way Americans pronounce "niche" . "I've discovered a niche" sounds rather amusing to me when Americans say it whereas we pronounce it "neesh".

Anyway I don't want to derail this thread.....



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 04:01 PM
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Sremmos80
reply to post by eletheia
 


Winch is right, used to pull things to what ever it is attached to




The definition of A wrench is a tool with jaws, used for holding, turning or twisting

WRENCH ... the same as a ratchet, derived from the word 'ratchet', which is

derived from the tool - hence >> 'wrench'



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by eletheia
 

Surely you are both right about two different words?
A winch is a piece of machinery, "hoisting-machine", often with line attached.
A wrench is more of a hand-tool, and probably applied directly.
I can't help thinking that in the circumstances of lifting a deer, a winch would have been more useful.

Though I think we all agree that it wasn't a wench. You can't normally get them strong enough.




edit on 16-2-2014 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by eletheia
 


To beat a dead horse
Gosh I hope I am using that right



Baddogma
Someone used a "wench" to lift a dead deer onto their truck's hood in another thread.

I assume they meant "winch," but maybe not...


A wrench, which you did define correctly would not be able to complete that action.
While a winch would do just fine



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