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Crocodiles.

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posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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I have no idea why but recently I've become interested in crocodiles. I did some checking and evidently the saltwater croc was close to extinction in the 70's due to poaching. Think about that - they survive 200 million years through everything the earth can throw at them and humans come along and take them out. I'm speaking of the Australian saltwater specifically.

Now some in Australia are asking that hunting be brought back due to deaths such as this one.

Recent death in The Northern Territory in Australia of a child, aged 12. He and 4 others were swimming and while two of the other boys were bitten, one is missing. What seems odd to me (and I'm no expert) is that the entire group of boys were attacked. Not just one.

www.abc.net.au...

From 2013 -



After the last fatality in August, calls for crocodile culling are once again resounding through the community. “The time for dithering and pandering to the radical green element is over. We need urgent action,” says Queensland Senator Ian MacDonald in response to increasing reports of crocodiles trespassing into coastal communities, including a 5-m monster seen sunning itself on a riverbank behind a primary school. Those calls are being seconded by ranchers in northern Australia who say they are losing more stock to crocodiles every year.


world.time.com...

I wonder if we can coexist with these dinosaurs. I will say that one of the reasons for conservation is that some want to see if the monster croc can make a come back. It takes between 50-100 years for a croc to grow to the size they think is capable of monster capacity (20-30 feet). While I don't want to see anything go extinct - how would it work out for us with a bunch of meat eaters getting that big? I think they must be like sharks - don't prefer us as food. Unlike sharks - they don't take a bite and spit you out. They are truly ancient.





posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:31 PM
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Oops.
I thought this was a thread on Krokodil.
Seriously now...he (or she) is boootiful.
What a beast!
Funny...I have an urge to watch the original Miami Vice just to see Elvis now...

-Peace-



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Eryiedes
 


That's actually classic because I didn't think I would get any replies so your accidental one is humorous to me.
. Peace



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:49 PM
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fascinating. you have inspired me. seriously.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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I am glad to hear that
. I did learn that if being attacked by one you should go for their eyes. But I also learned there was one that formed an attachment with a guy. The crocs name was Ponco in Puerto Rico. The crock was shot in the eye. A local nursed him back to health and the croc and he became friends. He tried to release it into the wild but it would show back up at his house. Brain damage that changed his behavior or a true attachment? All I know is it's fascinating. Mystifying animals.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 12:41 AM
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reply to post by Dianec
 


The thing is about it here, that crocs and sharks and all the little nasties that inhabit Australia are part of the scenery. Given the fact the crocs generally only live in the top end tropics wildly, they're actually quite uncommon elsewhere.

What gets me is every time some random idiot or tourist that thinks they know better puts their toes in the water or a creek where's it's usually CLEARLY marked there may be crocs or other nasties and gets killed as a result, the nay sayers jump in and scream KILL! KILL IT! It's Australia, DUH... We live among this kind of stuff every day...


Most Australians accept we share this awesome country with all these things and show respect for them, ie: if you don't want to get eaten, bitten or stung, be mindful of where these things are. What people seem to forget is, these are wild animals that we are constantly encroaching on, so they will get a meal wherever they can find it, whether it be another animal or a human.

It's a real pity Steve Irwin went when he did. He was a firm believer in respecting animals, no matter how dangerous they could be to humans. Sadly to this day we seem to be the most dangerous species ever brought to this country, and the sharks and crocs will suffer as a result.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 06:57 AM
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Crocs scare the bejesus out of me.

When I look at the gaping maw of a saltwater crocodile I feel a primordial fear well up inside.

Crocs, grizzly bears, great white sharks and brain-jarring techno....things I would rather not cross paths with.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by 74Templar
 


That was what left the biggest impression on me when I visited Oz a couple of years ago, mother nature has still got her claws, teeth and stingers attached in that country. I loved Australia, and her people are great, they just get on with their lives surrounded by awesome lifeforms. Oz is the destination of choice for many young people from my country when the take a year out of college, it's a wonder more visitors don't get into trouble with the wildlife over there, too busy getting pissed I guess.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 07:42 AM
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reply to post by 74Templar
 


The way it sounds they are badly overpopulating - in people's back yards, etc....yet the area you speak of is not overly populated by humans. I think 90,000 crocs to 200,000 people with more than enough land for both. Humans and dinosaur era reptiles cannot coexist so people need to simply stay away. They do actually shoot them if they attack a human, and culling is being proposed. I can see having to live there - no recreation opportunities near water because of them - but there must be a happy medium with their continued growth - make some swimming holes just for people (engineer it that way, etc). Out of everything what amazed me the most is how much more dangerous we are at the end of the day. I bet they win the right to hunt them again - given the governor is calling for it. Or perhaps this is just rhetoric each time an attack happens.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by seabhac-rua
 


They scare the bejesus out of me too. I have no interest in taking a boat trip in the Northern Territory or anywhere else in the world where they live. Am happy to just watch you tube footage of them. The stereotype from films probably give them a bad rap (monster), but since they can win a fight with any of the animals you speak of they seem to fit more closely than the shark (Jaws). They won't seek us out so we should just stay a good distance away. And if living with them - outsmart them with some preventatives (if possible).



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by Dianec
 


That's pretty much why every second person here has a swimming pool or have patrolled beaches where people swim.

This is a little outdated, but shows all the listings of crocs sighted in Queensland in 2013. It does look like a lot, but a quick look in the notes shows these are known croc habitats and are signed accordingly.

Croc Sightings 2013

Most of the time when someone is taken, it is because they are swimming in an area known to have crocodiles and ignoring the signs, much the same way in the southern areas Great Whites are prevalent. If you stick to the patrolled beaches, and understand this is their home you'll be ok.

It's kinda the same logic as brown snakes and spiders here. Don't go walking in long grass on hot days with shorts or no shoes, don't go sticking your hands into dark corners of the shed without checking first. Just common sense really.

I really think at the heart of it our gubment is pandering to overseas tourists by promising to kill off anything that could potentially harm you. If there are people out there killing off the nasties, then it must be safe.

I say use common sense, leave 'em the hell alone. Or more simply, don't go into their habitat.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by 74Templar
 


That list is great - that they provide that information to the public. I don't understand why they would remove a sign after only 7 days if one has been spotted. Wouldn't it be better to have different levels of warnings. Meaning - level 1 - occational sightings - level 5 known habitat.

The boys who inspired the film blackwater were carried out by a tital flood, and a croc just happened to be there. Because a salt water can live in either fresh or salt water I would assume they could be anywhere. They are territorial so I can see them speading into new waterways all the time.

There was one in your list spotted in a designated swimming area - said it had gotten out of the net (or into?). They should perhaps bury nets deep into the ground and make them impenatratable for those swimming holes.

With regard to killing them off - that would only create a false sense of security. I thought tourists liked that there were so many wild crocs but I can see your assertion - it's all about the money so if getting scared off just say your going to shoot some.

I actually would like to visit one day - but would truly want to be in a very big boat for those canals. The smaller ones don't seem safe enough. They should truly just educate kids in that area from gradeschool on about their habits and common sense preventatives. It also used to bother me when some idiot would go and stand on the very edge of a 200 foot cliff to be sprayed by the surf only to slip or get hit with a wave and killed. Signs actually had to be put up telling people why this is dangerous. Unbeleivable.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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Dianec
reply to post by 74Templar
 


That list is great - that they provide that information to the public. I don't understand why they would remove a sign after only 7 days if one has been spotted. Wouldn't it be better to have different levels of warnings. Meaning - level 1 - occational sightings - level 5 known habitat.


The main reason for signs is a croc is sometimes seen in an area it wouldn't normally inhabit. You won't see them much south of Mackay in Queensland, and the saltwaters tend to occupy the far north of the continent. The main population areas in that region are Darwin, Broome and Cairns, although you will see them around Townsville. Mackay is pretty much the southern line of the tropics, so it gets a little cold any further south. Not completely out of the question to see one further south, there was a story of one in a river not too far from where I live in SE Queensland, but it was never confirmed and was most likely a hoax.


There was one in your list spotted in a designated swimming area - said it had gotten out of the net (or into?). They should perhaps bury nets deep into the ground and make them impenatratable for those swimming holes.


Major beaches in Queensland and across the majority of Australia have shark nets around them to deter them from coming close to shore. In the north the same goes for crocs, although a crocodile can come ashore pretty much anywhere. TBH I wouldn't go swimming anywhere north of where I am, it's not just ocean life, there's stonefish, man o'wars and other stinging creatures that inhabit the ocean that can take you out as easily as a croc will. It's just that when a shark or a croc does it, it tends to make the news.



I actually would like to visit one day - but would truly want to be in a very big boat for those canals. The smaller ones don't seem safe enough. They should truly just educate kids in that area from gradeschool on about their habits and common sense preventatives. It also used to bother me when some idiot would go and stand on the very edge of a 200 foot cliff to be sprayed by the surf only to slip or get hit with a wave and killed. Signs actually had to be put up telling people why this is dangerous. Unbeleivable.


A lot of the deaths are tourists who either ignore or don't understand the signs, or can't be bothered to be educated about the wildlife here. Most kids are taught from a young age what lives here and what is potentially harmful. It's just a part of life. I remember reading somewhere you are 10x more likely to be hit by a car here than taken by a croc or a shark. Australia is an amazingly varied place from one end to the other, but like anywhere, living here, or even visiting here is just common sense. I've been here 40 years and have never seen a croc or a shark outside of a park. Spiders, snakes, jellyfish? Sure, heaps of them. The closest marine animal I ever saw was a rather large stingray while diving once. I reckon he cut and run one way as fast as I did the other...



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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Thank you for sharing your stories and experiences. It would be really hard to not swim in the sea but I know its full of dangers such as the stingray you speak of. There is also that stone fish that you can step on. The pacific is so cold that nothing too dangerous lives there - nothing but average stuff to look out for. Maybe the sea lion - like a dog can bite you - but they don't.

I hope to visit one day - see the kangaroo's, maybe a park with crocs, and relish the warm weather. Thanks again.




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