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Possible briny water on Mars?

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posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:24 PM
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www.foxnews.com...

I first heard about this on the radio at a gas station while filling up. I came home and searched it and here it is. Speculation abounds at NASA, but maybe they need to position their satellites over these gorges earlier in the martian morning, don't you think?

I have no doubt there is water below the surface of Mars, just how far down and how much? This suggests quite a bit or very shallow if it rises and receeds seasonally, also suggesting a tempurature induced tide of sorts. There is life in those water tables, you can bet on it, or at least I am.




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:27 PM
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Boscov
I have no doubt there is water below the surface of Mars, just how far down and how much?

Let's send Surviorman Les Stroud there for a week and see if he can hack it.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:27 PM
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I have no doubt we will find simple life in our solar system with in our lifetime.

If we haven't already seen the evidence of it.
edit on 11-2-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by Boscov
 


Good catch. S&F



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:34 PM
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A bit of a dated story.
www.sciencedaily.com...


But "positioning" MRO over a particular location at a particular time isn't all that feasible. You don't just drive a satellite around. You don't park a satellite.

In any case, taking pictures of it really doesn't tell us exactly what it is.

edit on 2/11/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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Phage
A bit of a dated story.
www.sciencedaily.com...

In any case, taking pictures of it really doesn't tell us exactly what it is.

edit on 2/11/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Yeah , but it would keep Arken busy for several weeks.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


All good points. In this case, repositioning would serve the hypothesis well, irregardless of logistics. Whatever is leaving the traces of iron antifreeze, what NASA is calling it, is most curious. Water below the surface is not too far a stretch to imagine, but yes, field observation and samples are a must. Water is important enough to re-route for earlier morning observations, no matter the cost or endeavor.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by Boscov
 


Water below the surface is not too far a stretch to imagine, but yes, field observation and samples are a must.
No. Not too far a stretch at all.
www.nasa.gov...



edit on 2/11/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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Phage
A bit of a dated story.
www.sciencedaily.com...


But "positioning" MRO over a particular location at a particular time isn't all that feasible. You don't just drive a satellite around. You don't park a satellite.
Oh c'mon phage, just because you havent passed your driving test dosn't mean nobody else can.

I think they might find signs of an earlier life that existed a long time ago on mars, or maybe some microbes even now, but for intelligent life I think we're all looking in the wrong place. We are blinded by the thought that life MUST have water, I think thats BS. There's planets in our solar system with liquid, its not water, but it is liquid and thats what is needed for life.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I am attempting to discuss flowing water. What I found interesting about the article is the volatiles that may be supporting the rise and fall flow. Thanks for sharing the older and glacial link, but please do not infer I have not read about glacial water on Mars. This finding, albeit in 2011, may not even be water, but whatever it is, it suggests a liquid, which to me is the fascinating observation.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by Boscov
 

It could be water.
Water which is frozen for most of the time, melts in the summer, and makes its way to the surface.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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Phage
A bit of a dated story.
www.sciencedaily.com...


But "positioning" MRO over a particular location at a particular time isn't all that feasible. You don't just drive a satellite around. You don't park a satellite.

In any case, taking pictures of it really doesn't tell us exactly what it is.

edit on 2/11/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I received a news update from NASA today and it was about this, it really doesn't say much they have not said before though.


They compared new observations with images from previous years, revealing that RSL are much more abundant some years than others.

"NASA likes to 'follow the water' in exploring the Red Planet, so we'd like to know in advance when and where it will appear," Wray said. "RSL have rekindled our hope of accessing modern water, but forecasting wet conditions remains a challenge."


www.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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Boscov
www.foxnews.com...

I first heard about this on the radio at a gas station while filling up. I came home and searched it and here it is. Speculation abounds at NASA, but maybe they need to position their satellites over these gorges earlier in the martian morning, don't you think?

I have no doubt there is water below the surface of Mars, just how far down and how much? This suggests quite a bit or very shallow if it rises and receeds seasonally, also suggesting a tempurature induced tide of sorts. There is life in those water tables, you can bet on it, or at least I am.


Old regurgitated story from December.... not surprised it took Fox News that long to pick up on it, they're a bit slow on the uptake....

Here it was originally... from a real news source:

Puzzling Streaks On Mars May Be From Flowing Water - December 10, 2013




Dark seasonal streaks on slopes near the Martian equator may be a sign of flowing salt water on Mars, liquid runoff that melts and evaporates during the planet's warmer months, scientists say.

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spotted the dark streaks on Mars as they formed and grew in the planet's late spring and summer seasons, when the Martian equatorial region receives the most sunlight. The streaks then faded the next season as cooler temperatures prevailed.

These seasonally occurring flows — known as Recurring Slope Lineae — were previously seen on Martian slopes at mid-latitudes, but the MRO spacecraft has now detected them near the equator of the Red Planet. While there have been no direct detections of liquid water, the new findings hint at a surprisingly active water cycle on Mars today, said study leader Alfred McEwen, a professor of planetary geology at the University of Arizona in Tucson.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:02 PM
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Boscov
reply to post by Phage
 


All good points. In this case, repositioning would serve the hypothesis well, irregardless of logistics.



The word you want is regardless. Irregardless isn't really a word.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Agreed. Having read what Phage pointed out, it is redundant, which is odd. I guess they are short on finds, rehashing old info. I see the baloon deflating now, lol. Still cool though, maybe they will shock us sooner than later.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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Could be water. Could be those darned blueberries getting periodically darker for some odd reason.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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From the "epic" Mars anomalies thread, funbox posted this image from a source he was pointed to on the previous page.

funbox's post:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



edit on 11-2-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by JadeStar
 


Fair enough. I am sure you have never used slang in a conversation, or typed words with improper grammatical prose. A star for you, superstar.
edit on 11-2-2014 by Boscov because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-2-2014 by Boscov because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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Boscov
reply to post by JadeStar
 


Fair enough. I am sure you have never used slang in a conversation, or typed words with improper grammatical prose. A star for you, superstar.


Irregardless of your irritation, please, be civiledless (and I know what irregardless means, so you communicated quite well).



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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Aleister
From the "epic" Mars anomalies thread, funbox posted this image from a source he was pointed to on the previous page.

funbox's post:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



edit on 11-2-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)


Now that's very cool! That guy can make some really nice GIFs.

I cannot see how people can look at all the activity on Mars and think, even for a second, that there is NOT life on Mars.
I think it should be considered a given.

ETA: I think most of us are prone to the occasional typo of grammatical mistake (lord knows I am), but irregardless gets me every time. Haha. Its like using two extra letters to say the same thing.
Kinda funny in context of this thread since someone accused Phage of being redundant.

edit on 11-2-2014 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



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