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make your own leather Backpack

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posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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I've been reading through some of these threads, what to buy what not to buy what works what doesn't??? Do you go simple or splurge for the biggest and badest?

But I think--- why not just make it yourself?
then you can customized it any damn way you want? and since you made you'll also know how to fix or mod it right?
Besides the early trappers and mountain men did it this way so why not

FYI my wife's the real leather crafter in this family so when I asked her for pictures and patterns She knew right where to go and allowed me to share it with all of you--- your thanks should in reality go to her--- after all credit, due to the angry lady who would never let me live it down if I didn't give her props

So lets start with a vid



A pattern for this bag can be found here



And a detailed materials list can be found here

If you guys find more pic and patterns post them here--- the more options the better
edit on 11-2-2014 by HardCorps because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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I'm going to refer to this later. I was hoping to make a satchel with long cross body strap. Full grain - something that will get better with time like a saddleback or Duluth. For a first timer I am thinking this would be easier (and open ended bag). I'm hoping you don't need a special sewing machine. Now to find the material. Without even looking - nice leather in color of choice, thick leathery thread, buckles (strong ones), a pointy devise to create holes, and probably something to reinforce straps so they don't stretch and wear out over time. Sounds like a fun project.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Dianec
 



I'm hoping you don't need a special sewing machine




It's called a Sewing Awl
Ten Bucks from Tandy



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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Perfect. Thank you. It looks like this will make the holes and do the sewing all in one. When I was a kid my grandma made me this stiff belt with my name across the entire back. I remember feeling embarrassed to wear it (all the kids had cool ones and mine was homemade - 12 year old thing), but I wish I still had it. She also made me a hat I do still have - more of a suede material. Very nice yet too small for me now.

This is what I want to make. I would upload the photo but the link above isn't giving me that option today.

women.duluthtrading.com...

I'm thinking it would be fairly simple, and I can make it the size I want. If I can do this bag then maybe I'll take on that amazing backpack you have above.The biggest issue might be with edges so I'll be paying close attention to those.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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What does that leather backpack weigh, and what would a cloth backpack weigh? would it be quicker and cheaper to make a cloth backpack? Would a cloth backpack be easier to repair? just some thoughts.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 01:00 PM
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Another thought, cloth is easier to distort to fit an odd shaped object inside the pack.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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If weight is a factor then Leather would not be the way to go. I agree that more attention should be spent on making or modifying your own equipment



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:09 PM
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Leather or canvas are the toughest materials though. If you want something that will last come what may it seems cloth wouldn't be a good option. Good idea on modifying what you have. Perhaps adding patches of different rugged materials to a preexisting pack, satchel, or duffel bag is a good option if in a pinch. Knowing how to make something from leather - overall - seems like a good skill to possess.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 


man that is a slick looking pack....got a website to just buy one...im too lazy to make it lol



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 



That does look really cool, but what happens when it gets soaking wet?

Personally, it's not that practical for me and I'll keep my cloth backpacks and kit bags.

Very nice craft(wo)manship though



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by pikestaff
 


I wonder if one made out of hemp would be stronger than cloth.



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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aorAki
reply to post by HardCorps
 



That does look really cool, but what happens when it gets soaking wet?

Personally, it's not that practical for me and I'll keep my cloth backpacks and kit bags.

Very nice craft(wo)manship though



Mink Oil.


It's like $3 bucks a can
waterproofs, conditions, softens and protects your leather goods.
I like to prep the material by warming it up with a blow-dryer or heat-gun first.
that way when you apply the paste it liquefies and really soaks into the leather.

This stuff is great on your leather boots too--- don't use it on suede though
edit on 13-2-2014 by HardCorps because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 09:52 AM
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pikestaff
What does that leather backpack weigh, and what would a cloth backpack weigh? would it be quicker and cheaper to make a cloth backpack? Would a cloth backpack be easier to repair? just some thoughts.


Look I was just giving options.
Of course you could use cloth like from an old pair of blue jeans etc.
Why you could even use a piece of woven carpet.
As long as you have the pattern you can use anything you want.



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 09:55 AM
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Bloody lovely. Bloody brilliant.

Thank you for this.



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 04:19 PM
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That does look really cool, but what happens when it gets soaking wet?


While you can make it pretty waterproof, it still isn't great out in the rain.

The other issue is weight. It's going to be pretty heavy. Looks damn nice though.



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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I'm really liking the idea of making a more personalized backpack... but I think I would make one from something like a good thick army canvas type of material rather than leather. The canvas would be easier to work with and a little more forgiving, as well as a lighter overall weight. Or maybe even a soft, pliable deerskin or mooseskin... hmmm...

I do native leather and beading work (moccasins, mukluks, gauntlets, etc), so making a backpack more specific to an individual's needs/wants is a fantastic idea... wish I would have thought of this myself !

Hell, I could even gussy up a backpack design with some cool native beadwork too, but that would be more for an everyday use type of backpack rather than a bugout bag usage....

Now you've got my thinking/creative juices flowing !

Thanks for the pattern and materials list. Sometime this weekend I think I'll spend the day looking for different ideas on backpack designs (both utility and everyday usage). If I find anything good, I'll post it in this thread.




posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 01:59 AM
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Just an FYI for anyone who's thinking about taking on a project like this:

When it comes to doing any kind of leatherwork, it's always best to use a cheap/free material (like an old pair of jeans) and make a full prototype first to be sure you've got it all figured out and know exactly what you're doing and decide on any tweaking you might want to add/subtract from the design before you dive in and start making something out of an expensive material like leather.



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 




I like to prep the material by warming it up with a blow-dryer or heat-gun first. that way when you apply the paste it liquefies and really soaks into the leather.


Great tip!

I remember how my father and I would put our hunting and work boots in front of the woodstove to get them warm before we put the mink oil on them.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 03:14 PM
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The top pick is functionally a saddle bag, for a human to carry. My guess is that it could easily be rainproof---not submersible, but as rainproof as a pair of leather gloves, chaps, or duster usw.

Probably last for several decades. I would imagine it would be great in heavy brush, which is why leather is the only choice for tack. Other places with a lot of abrasion as well.

So, for toting books to campus, it probably wouldn't work well (unless worn with a coordinating hat, serape, and cheroot.)

But, for hiking, particularly amid heavy brush and pines, or when carrying some object you don't want crushed, it would be just the ticket.



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