It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Encoded Magnets

page: 1
11
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:53 AM
link   
Working on a toy for his grandson, scientist and inventor Larry Fullerton wondered whether coding and correlation theory used for communications in radar signals in the time domain could be applied to magnetic structures in the spatial domain.

He built a prototype to test his theory. It was a pair of encoded magnetic structures designed to produce strong coupling force in only one spatial orientation. It worked.

The name of the company that resulted is Correlated Magnetics Research. Here is an introductory video:



Their website states:


Correlated magnetics is a fundamental breakthrough in magnetics. By combining many magnetic fields, CMR’s patented Polymagnet® technology transforms ordinary magnets into precision-tailored magnetic systems that produce complex functions not possible with conventional magnets. Magnetic functions are created with the world’s first magnetic printer, the CMR MagPrinter®. The MagPrinter creates patterns of small magnetic regions called maxels on rare-earth, ferrite or flexible magnetic materials. Each Polymagnet pattern creates a unique function – demonstrated in videos below.

www.correlatedmagnetics.com...


Thanks to Jason Verbelli of Searl Magnetics for posting his YouTube video bringing this to my attention:





posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:23 AM
link   
Excellent find, Mary Rose! I couldn't watch the video with sound, but from what I saw that stuff is amazing! I will definitely read up on this. Thank you.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:30 AM
link   
reply to post by RationalDespair
 


You're welcome.

They are cool.


I think this guy had the perspective of his experience and knowledge plus the motivation of being a creative grandparent and a great innovation came out of it.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:48 AM
link   
reply to post by Mary Rose
 


Wow, that is fantastic!
You can code magnets to behave certain ways. Watching the video I wasnt overly impressed at first. However when he showed how the magnets can be coded to attract and the stop the attraction at a certain point is when I had my aha moment.
Lots of possible uses there.

Cant wait to see this exploited.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:48 AM
link   
Whoa! That got my mind going, I wonder if they will be able to figure out the Earths code (If it has one?), I'm ready to see wheel less cars floating around. I,e, Land speeders. I wonder how it could be, if at all, applied to propulsion?







spaceships.30doradus.org...

edit on 11-2-2014 by Im2keul because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:53 AM
link   

Mary Rose
Working on a toy for his grandson, scientist and inventor Larry Fullerton wondered whether coding and correlation theory used for communications in radar signals in the time domain could be applied to magnetic structures in the spatial domain.
We've been doing something like this for many years, and most of you probably already have such a device, called a hard disk drive, which has correlated magnetic patterns in a spatial domain.

This video is the first time I've seen the idea discussed in the context of a toy (aside from hard-drive-based computer games etc), but having designed toys myself, I can't say I really see the play value of a toy based on this concept, at least not from what is shown in the video. Maybe he needs a better demonstration to show that, or maybe it's no longer about play but I'm not sure I understand what applications he's targeting.
edit on 11-2-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:01 AM
link   
Wow, we never got taught about magnets at school,they are weird,spooky action at a distance. I only watched the last video but it reminded me of the strong and weak forces within an atom. So strange
Thanks s and f



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:01 AM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I think you're missing the point. The toy is only what got him started.

So you're saying this is nothing new.
edit on 02/11/14 by Mary Rose because: Typo



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:03 AM
link   
reply to post by Im2keul
 


I like your imagination.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:11 AM
link   
Very interesting, and not to put a dampener on it, though this is an application of the technology used to produce fridge magnets, and indeed hard drive platters if you want to go to the extreme.

This is extremely neat though, not exactly a breakthrough in terms of fundamental magnetics, but a extremely cleaver and very nice application of technology. It is quite cool to see the use of patterns in order to customize the external effect of two magnets coming together. Somewhat niche, but I imagine you can do some interesting things with them none the less.

Take one of those magnets from your fridge and cut a sliver down the longer edge of it. you will notice when you drag the two magnetic surfaces over oneanother the small sliver will attract and repel in lines... it is exactly the same idea
edit on 11-2-2014 by ErosA433 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 10:28 AM
link   

Mary Rose
I think you're missing the point. The toy is only what got him started.

So you're saying this in nothing new.
The hard drive platter has a spatial magnetic pattern on it. We don't push another platter against the platter in hard drives which would be more analogous to what's shown in the video. Instead, we float a small probe over the platter to read the magnetic encoding, and it gives us useful data storage.

So it it new? Well the reason we don't press hard drive platters against each other is because it wouldn't do anything useful. So yes you could say it's new in that respect, but the question remains if anything useful can be done with this. I'm open minded to the possibility of some future application but I don't really see anything useful in the video. I looked at their applications page and they mention telescopes and some other applications, but telescopes already have very advanced technology in them and they don't really explain how this will help any more than existing telescope technology. I do find hard drive technology very useful however and I see it as having a lot of similarity. Here is an illustration from the video in the OP:



Compare that to this illustration of how magnetic data is recorded on a hard drive:
digital-forensics.sans.org...

See how both have spatial magnetic patterns?

Here's a more detailed view which shows that each one and zero consists of multiple magnetic domains (the graininess):
The magnetic 1's and 0's on a hard drive comprise very small regions so this technology is very advanced to accurately read such small areas.

As for their telescope application, here is what they are competing with:

www.gmto.org...

One of the most sophisticated engineering aspects of the telescope is what is known as "adaptive optics." The telescope's secondary mirrors are actually flexible. Under each secondary mirror surface, there are hundreds of actuators that will constantly adjust the mirrors to counteract atmospheric turbulence. These actuators, controlled by advanced computers, will transform twinkling stars into clear steady points of light. It is in this way that the GMT will offer images that are 10 times sharper than the Hubble Space Telescope.
This is very sophisticated engineering.

What is shown in the OP video is frankly not very sophisticated. But maybe it will prove useful somehow.

edit on 11-2-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:01 AM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 




What is shown in the OP video is frankly not very sophisticated. But maybe it will prove useful somehow.



Soooo, no land speeder?
Guess I'll hold off on the for sale sign on the ol' truck then.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:34 PM
link   
I think this is exactly what is needed to make a electromagnetic motor. fascinating stuff



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 01:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Fylgje
 


I think you can just use regular magnets to make an electromagnetic motor. I'm not sure how these would help.

That said, I think overall, there may be some novel manufacturing and materials/parts-handling uses with some of the no-contact attraction encoded pairs among other uses.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 02:13 PM
link   
This is essentially the technology behind Maglev; more specifically Elecrodynamic Suspension. The difference being between earth magnets and dynamically controlled electromagnets. In both cases, you are aggregating different magnetic fields to create a force specific to the application.

Pretty neat stuff!

I'm curious to see if you could get that air-locking magnet (the one in the triangle encasing) to spin by electronically controlling that pattern.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Halfswede
 


What I'm talking about is instead of gasoline firing the pistons in a motor, have the magnets pull them back & forth.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 07:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Fylgje
 

Good idea.
How do you move the magnets?



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:48 PM
link   
I think anything new is cool. There have been innumerable ideas which had no applications for them when they were just ideas or even a prototype, but once they exist, so someone else can eventually creatively think, "Hey, what if I coupled cool-thing-X to my cool-idea-Y?" the world can change.

Sadly I'm not 100% clear on how this works or what its potentials are to even think of applications. But the topic of subtle magnetics used in biological contexts seems like a wide open field that might benefit from any gained precision.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 11:39 PM
link   
Arb I've been watching correlated magnetics for several years now.

So that video didn't do a good job of explaining much of anything really.

First of all what they're actually selling is magnet printers to make your own correlated magnets to your own specifications as well as the software to make the pattern you want do limited simulation of it and then when you have what you want use the magnet printer to program the magnet.

you can program any number of different types of magnets with any of a whole catalog of predone magnet designs or use the software to custom design your own maxel pattern for your own application. Also if i remember right it is said to work on more than just flat magnets and can in fact program 3 dimensional patterns.

While I agree with you about this probably not being all that special of a toy, I'm pretty shocked that your mind didn't spit forth an avalanche of other really neat applications you could come up with using one of those printers and some inventiveness. Matter of fact I'm working on writing up a provisional patent for something that wouldn't be possible without correlated magnetics magnet printers. My guess is this is quite literally going to set off a patent foot race as big and small IP firms alike race to slam out as many applications as possible to lock down any of the THOUSANDS of things this now makes possible!

Unfortunately though this doesn't bring anyone any closer to a magnet motor that I can see....

Especially considering you can't run their printer without their software and the developer in his previous career worked at some sort of skunk employment agency....

(even if he wasn't an ex skunk worker though I highly doubt this would get people like searl any closer to what he said he accomplished decades ago but hasn't been able to replicate since.)



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 01:52 AM
link   
reply to post by roguetechie
 

Hey if you're going to put this tech to good use, more power to you. Clever inventors with clever ideas deserve to benefit from creative ideas which they patent, which is part of the idea behind the patent system.

Don't let the fact you thought of something I didn't slow you down. On the other hand, it's not so much that I can't think of anything to do with correlated magnets so much as any application I can think of, I can also imagine ways to do the same things better and faster, as with the telescope example I mentioned where the technology doesn't use correlated magnets and it's pretty darn good.

But if someone can explain to me how correlated magnets will make that or any other technology better, I'm all ears, but it would be appreciated if this explanation is given by someone who understands the alternate technologies available (like the telescope example).

At least we both agree that the video in the OP was kind of a dud and didn't show much that was useful.



new topics

top topics



 
11
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join