Could we soon REGROW our limbs?

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posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 04:18 AM
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Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head



Planarian flatworms can regenerate their heads if they are cut off, yet its cousin the Dendrocoelum lacteum doesn't have this ability.
Researchers wanted to find the genetic differences between these worms by closing a specific gene pathway, the D. lacteum began to regenerate, This means regenerative abilities could be similarly activated in other species, including as humans



Dr Rink added: 'Rebuilding a head complete with brain, eyes and all the wiring in between is evidently complicated business. However, as the study showed, regeneration defects are not necessarily irreversible. 'We thought we would have to manipulate hundreds of different switches to repair a regeneration defect; now we learned that sometimes only a few nodes may do.

'Will this knowledge soon be applicable to more complex organisms - like humans, for example?
'We showed that by comparisons amongst related species we can obtain insights into why some animals regenerate while others don't - that's an important first step.' The research was published in the journal Nature.


Source: - Could we soon REGROW our limbs? Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head

I have among many of my other interest been a very avid researcher in all things concerning human longevity. The recent news that blood cells have been turned back into stem cells through the use of acid given rise to the possibility of self healing was fantastic new enough, but this is on a new level of self healing.

The article talks about regrowing limbs... but I think the potential of this goes far beyond that. I think this technology has the potential to regenerate biological damage to all parts of the body... maintaining the human condition as opposed to just regrowing severed extremities.

Potentially this is a cure of the greatest disease of all... death itself. If you look at why people die it's either by irreversible trauma caused by an external force or the degradation of critical life sustaining systems internally.

Either types of damage could be reversed (external trauma to a less extent) with this technology were possible in humans.

An important step forward indeed, given 10 years I suspect all our lives will be extended quite considerable with the implementation of this technology.

Peace,

Korg.


edit on 11-2-2014 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 04:28 AM
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Great thread! Here is a video of a guy who regrew his finger.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 04:44 AM
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mmirror
Great thread! Here is a video of a guy who regrew his finger.


Awesome vid!

I find it fascinating that this was not bigger news, as I had not heard of this until today.

If you look back in history at our greatest achievements technologically there has always been several ways to skin the same cat. So the fact that there are multiple technologies being developed that all head to the same goal... longevity increased exponentially, shows that the potential to literally live almost indefinably is a very real prospect for our species.

In the many discussions I have had about radically extending our life spans the subject of social structure and the degradation of our current culture is always raised. I think at this point the biggest challenge facing us is not whether we could extend out lifespans but how would our social structure change and what we need to do now to prepare for the eventuality of increasing our lifespan.

I'm 40 years old and I like the idea that I'm still in my infancy given the prospect of living 200 years or more.

On a side note that video was very uplifting however also very sad to see those people who put there lives on the line for our way of life be damaged in such horrific ways.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


This heading should read: Atheism looses another toy!

Why doesn't God heal amputees? Turns out, it will be done.


Just say'in.

SnF OP
edit on 11-2-2014 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:11 AM
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randyvs
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


This heading should read: Atheism looses another toy!

Why doesn't God heal amputees? Turns out, it will be done.


Just say'in.

SnF OP
edit on 11-2-2014 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


I don't believe in the god of religions... I believe in humanity... it wasn't god that is creating this technology it was us...

Though your point has some merit, in so much as if we were able to live massively extended lives, possibly indefinitely, wouldn't fear of death be removed to some extent?

If that was the case wouldn't the main motivator for religions be removed? Let's face the reality of it, most people believe in an afterlife because they cannot face the prospect that death is truly the end.

And Christ offering ever lasting life if you believe and pass the unknown threshold possibly leading to oblivion, would be a risk of faith with no value if you could definitely live forever anyway.

Does that mean that Religion doesn't have a place in a society of immortals?

I think it does have a place. albeit unrecognizable by today's standard....

Peace,

Korg.


edit on 11-2-2014 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:15 AM
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or .. regrowing may take to long for the impatient in this fast paced day ... when we could just print new limbs




This week, researchers at Hangzhou Dianzi University in China unveiled their Regenovo 3D printer. Unlike more familiar 3D printers, which work with plastic or metal dust, Regenovo prints living tissue – such as these little ears.


www.newscientist.com...



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:19 AM
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Segenam
or .. regrowing may take to long for the impatient in this fast paced day ... when we could just print new limbs




This week, researchers at Hangzhou Dianzi University in China unveiled their Regenovo 3D printer. Unlike more familiar 3D printers, which work with plastic or metal dust, Regenovo prints living tissue – such as these little ears.


www.newscientist.com...


Geeze the picture looks more like something that belongs in a tissue following a sneeze than an ear


But I think this is another highlighted technology all working towards the same goal....

Interesting times... and much hope for my children if not for myself.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:24 AM
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Korg Trinity
it wasn't god that is creating this technology it was us...


i know what you mean .. but in my mind .. ALL information already exists .. as .. information

we, tap into differing aspects of this (universal) knowledge, depending on our, 'vibrationb', or 'where we're at' ... or however you wish to describe ones mental, physical and spiritual state ...

so when we 'invent' something, or 'create' some masterpiece of music, or art, or anything .. we are not creating it such .. we are replicating it ... cos the knowledge already exists without us .. we only tap into existing knowledge, and channel it accordingly

to further that .. if you accept that this universal knowledge does exist, and we do tap into it in some quantum fashion with our quantum computer brains ... its not much of a leap, from there, to assume, this universal knowledge that already exists regardless of whether we are there to tap into it or not, is likely the work of God ...
IE .. this is gods holographic simulation .. he entered all the data / information, that would be available for us to tap into .. and what we would tap into depending on our 'state' ....

anyhoo ... i want another tea now ...



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:52 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 





Does that mean that Religion doesn't have a place in a society of immortals?



Can you imagine the hope of all the people who've been disfigured
some how ? That's where this thread should go really.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:35 AM
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Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head


errr...worms dont have heads.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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PhoenixOD


Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head


errr...worms dont have heads.


Yes they do and here is how to find out which end is the head....

Take one worm...

Put it in some flour...

Wait until it farts...

The other end is the head....



Seriously though, I'm not suggesting that humans could grow a new head in the case of a decapitation... more that we could use this technology to maintain a healthy peak efficient physic.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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randyvs
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 





Does that mean that Religion doesn't have a place in a society of immortals?



Can you imagine the hope of all the people who've been disfigured
some how ? That's where this thread should go really.


I agree this is fantastic news for the dismembered... exciting news that may be, it is by my reckoning the thin end of the wedge.

Peace,

Korg.

edit on 11-2-2014 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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It boggles the mind what we'll be able to do in the next few decades. I do wonder though if robotic prosthetics reach the point where they can be controlled as well as a biological appendages and offer the same sense of touch, will the masses go with that over a regrown limb?



posted on Feb, 16 2014 @ 12:56 PM
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Korg Trinity

mmirror
Great thread! Here is a video of a guy who regrew his finger.


Awesome vid!

I find it fascinating that this was not bigger news, as I had not heard of this until today.


That's because it's a hoax. Your digits will regrow naturally of their own accord after having a surprising amount lopped off. The old "finger regrows from magic powder" story does the rounds every few years and the media credulously eats it up every time.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 01:33 PM
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Korg Trinity
Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head



Planarian flatworms can regenerate their heads if they are cut off, yet its cousin the Dendrocoelum lacteum doesn't have this ability.
Researchers wanted to find the genetic differences between these worms by closing a specific gene pathway, the D. lacteum began to regenerate, This means regenerative abilities could be similarly activated in other species, including as humans



Dr Rink added: 'Rebuilding a head complete with brain, eyes and all the wiring in between is evidently complicated business. However, as the study showed, regeneration defects are not necessarily irreversible. 'We thought we would have to manipulate hundreds of different switches to repair a regeneration defect; now we learned that sometimes only a few nodes may do.

'Will this knowledge soon be applicable to more complex organisms - like humans, for example?
'We showed that by comparisons amongst related species we can obtain insights into why some animals regenerate while others don't - that's an important first step.' The research was published in the journal Nature.


Source: - Could we soon REGROW our limbs? Scientists manage to get a non-regenerative worm to grow a new head

I have among many of my other interest been a very avid researcher in all things concerning human longevity. The recent news that blood cells have been turned back into stem cells through the use of acid given rise to the possibility of self healing was fantastic new enough, but this is on a new level of self healing.

The article talks about regrowing limbs... but I think the potential of this goes far beyond that. I think this technology has the potential to regenerate biological damage to all parts of the body... maintaining the human condition as opposed to just regrowing severed extremities.

Potentially this is a cure of the greatest disease of all... death itself. If you look at why people die it's either by irreversible trauma caused by an external force or the degradation of critical life sustaining systems internally.

Either types of damage could be reversed (external trauma to a less extent) with this technology were possible in humans.

An important step forward indeed, given 10 years I suspect all our lives will be extended quite considerable with the implementation of this technology.

Peace,

Korg.


edit on 11-2-2014 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)



how will this help muslim beheaders?

i mean they love beheadinmgs...other people.
edit on 18-2-2014 by beckybecky because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by GetHyped
 


Is it really?

I ask because the US Army has taken a keen interest in the Pig Stem cells treatment. I should also point out that I have had several family members who have had finger tips lost in a variety of accidents and not one of them grew back on it's own.

The only stories I can find of people regrowing a part of their finger are children and that is only if they still have part of the tip present.

On topic - this is exciting stuff and one of many such research efforts which may ultimately end up providing the Human race with biological immortality, which would be nice... I think though, if this does become possible, they should also engineer us to not be able to breed as much. As it stands, a human can be impregnated once a month (as opposed to in nature where it happens once a year) and can get pregnant the moment they have had a baby. If we tone this down to maybe once every year or so, we could all live long, happy lives without becoming overcrowded.



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 


If you have a scientifically credible source, I'm all ears, but until then it's just another cycle of the "magic dust regenerates fingers" hoax.

A short excerpt from Ben Goldacre's article regarding the hoax:


In the newspapers on May Day, meanwhile, journalists were earnestly reporting the news that pig's bladder extract had been used by scientists in a major breakthrough allowing one man to magically regrow a finger. "'Pixie dust' helps man grow new finger," squealed the Telegraph's headline. "'Pixie dust' makes man's severed finger regrow," said the Times. "Made from dried pig's bladder," they explained, this magic powder "kick-starts the body's healing process".

Now firstly, if you look at the pictures accompanying this column, you will see from the "before" image that there is no missing finger, so we might naively intuit that there is no "missing finger grows back" story to be written. In fact, from the grainy images and scant descriptions available - despite blanket news media coverage, including television interviews - it seems this bloke lost about 3/8 of an inch of skin and flesh from the tip of his finger, and the nail bed is intact.

Make no mistake: I'd be whingeing a lot if it happened to me, but injured fingers do heal, sometimes badly, often nicely, just like gouges and scrapes on the rest of your body. "Nerves, tissue, blood vessel, skin" regrew, said the BBC. Yes. Up and down the country as we speak. The body is an amazing thing. If your experience of rollerskating injuries is not enough, Simon Kay, professor of hand surgery at the University of Leeds, saw the before-and-after pictures, and says: "It looked to have been an ordinary fingertip injury with quite unremarkable healing. This is junk science."

Where did this miraculous story come from? Dr Badylak is the scientist quoted in all of these stories. He told me: "This story came to the media not through us, but rather through the patient. I would just as soon it had not gone out until we complete our pilot study." That is unfortunate. I asked how this patient was recruited, what consent was obtained, how safety was assessed, whether this work has been published, and whether it will be published. He did not answer. Fair enough. He agrees that scepticism is understandable. I'm grateful.

SNIP

Meanwhile, Dr Badylak now tells me that the entire nail bed was missing. This contradicts various previous news reports and apparently the pictures. He also says half the distal bone was missing. Confused? You should be. I've asked him for more pictures. I guess that just goes to show that the media is a confusing and inappropriate place to communicate new and unpublished epoch-making scientific breakthroughs (from 2005).

But we can console ourselves with the thought that one lucky company has had plenty of international media exposure. On three separate occasions. Over two years.



Consider this image from the article:



It's above the nail. It would have almost certainly regrown of it's own accord. Hardly warrants the extraordinary and hyperbolic claim of "man regrows finger". But, as usual, the media credulously lapped the story up.

Regarding fingertips growing back, your personal experience (or of those around you) does not make a consensus. See:


The human body has an amazing capacity for healing. Fingers are especially noteworthy as they have an excellent blood supply and the ability to heal major wounds. In fact, some fingertip injuries can seemingly grow back.
In general, for a fingertip injury to grow back, the injury must occur beyond where the nail starts, and some deformity of the tip of the finger will generally persist. But hand surgeons have long known that a cut-off fingertip can regain much of the normal feel, shape, and appearance. In fact, no expensive products are required, and with clean amputations of the tip of the digit, usually no surgery is required.

See this case of a patient who severed the tip of her finger, and within 7 weeks had returned to normal function and near-normal appearance.
edit on 18-2-2014 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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GetHyped
reply to post by stumason
 


If you have a scientifically credible source, I'm all ears, but until then it's just another cycle of the "magic dust regenerates fingers" hoax.

A short excerpt from Ben Goldacre's article regarding the hoax:


It's above the nail. It would have almost certainly regrown of it's own accord. Hardly warrants the extraordinary and hyperbolic claim of "man regrows finger". But, as usual, the media credulously lapped the story up.


Fair enough, seems there is more to the story than it would appear



GetHyped
Regarding fingertips growing back, your personal experience (or of those around you) does not make a consensus. See:


The human body has an amazing capacity for healing. Fingers are especially noteworthy as they have an excellent blood supply and the ability to heal major wounds. In fact, some fingertip injuries can seemingly grow back.
In general, for a fingertip injury to grow back, the injury must occur beyond where the nail starts, and some deformity of the tip of the finger will generally persist. But hand surgeons have long known that a cut-off fingertip can regain much of the normal feel, shape, and appearance. In fact, no expensive products are required, and with clean amputations of the tip of the digit, usually no surgery is required.

See this case of a patient who severed the tip of her finger, and within 7 weeks had returned to normal function and near-normal appearance.


Which is pretty much what I said, wasn't it? You have to have some fingertip left to regrow - any more than that and it won't. The family members who had missing digits had all lost the whole tip down to at least the first knuckle - one I think lost it to a rather ferocious chicken...
edit on 18/2/14 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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stumason

Which is pretty much what I said, wasn't it? You have to have some fingertip left to regrow - any more than that and it won't.
edit on 18/2/14 by stumason because: (no reason given)


Yes, from my understanding it must be above the bottom of the nail, which gives us quite a bit of variance to play with. Perhaps the people you know were the exceptions, or perhaps they were the norm and full regrowth is the exception. Looking at my digits, I would say I've got a good 10mm from tip to nail base but I've seen some people with freakishly small (or large) nails so maybe they have more wiggle room on the matter. So I guess you could chop off a surprisingly large amount of your finger and potentially have it grow back (and lets hope we never have to find out
)



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by GetHyped
 


I think the people I know all had quite extensive damage. One to a chicken and another to a loading arm on a tank, so I think they lost too much for any regrowth to occur..

On the subject of regeneration though, doesn't the Liver possess pretty good regeneration abilities?





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