It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Limitless: Valprioc acid allows brain to absorb new info as easily as it did before age 7

page: 1
13
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:33 PM
link   
Obviously we aint limitless but I'm making an analogy to the movie, for those who've seen it.

www.npr.org...


Takao Hensch, professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard ... is studying a drug which might allow adults to learn perfect pitch by re-creating this critical period in brain development. Hensch says the drug, valprioc acid, allows the brain to absorb new information as easily as it did before age 7.

"It's a mood-stabilizing drug, but we found that it also restores the plasticity of the brain to a juvenile state," Hensch tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer.

Hensch gave the drug to a group of healthy, young men who had no musical training as children. They were asked to perform tasks online to train their ears, and at the end of a two-week period, tested on their ability to discriminate tone, to see if the training had more effect than it normally would at their age.

In other words, he gave people a pill and then taught them to have perfect pitch. The findings are significant: "It's quite remarkable since there are no known reports of adults acquiring absolute pitch," he says.


Would you take it if given a prescription? I'd be interested if it helps learn new languages faster, more efficiently.

I wonder what sorts of things psychiatrics will prescribe it for, perhaps off the label now, speech impediments? Post-brain trauma? Special-ed children???




posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:36 PM
link   
reply to post by gardener
 


Would I take it?

You betcha I would. I am currently looking to see what medications it is in.


edit


Err...I just looked it up. I am already taking it for migraines. In all honesty it makes me a bit drowsy sometimes but for some reason food does taste better. I haven't noticed any memory enhancement.
edit on 10-2-2014 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:40 PM
link   
This has potentially awesome written all over it!!!



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:43 PM
link   
It's Depakote, primarily for epilepsy/seizure disorders. And, hell no, I wouldn't take it.

I used to work in a group home where I dispensed this med regularly (among others) and no, just no. The side-effects are numerous. And if a person were to take it up him/herself to go "limitless", well they likely would - into the great beyond.

I've read a few stories recently of various pysch meds (primarily anti-depressants) and how they can affect the plasticity of the brain. It's scary if you ask me. There's a reason we were children and became adults.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:45 PM
link   
Yeah, move over progidies, savants! Son or daughter keeps failing 4th grade? Put em on the pill and they skip grades all the way to college before you know it.

Or, take a few pills to master multiple instruments, professions, pass GRE, GMAT, MCAT, etc top of the class

Why not?



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:45 PM
link   
I take it for epilepsy, no major differences in memory here either.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:47 PM
link   
Guess it only works for 'healthy young men'.. or at least the one in the study.

Bummer. ;-)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 09:56 PM
link   
This was originally discussed a couple of weeks ago here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:08 PM
link   
reply to post by kalunom
 


Interesting, what exactly have you read regarding anti-depressants?

Depression is comonly seen in people who have in some way reduced specic areas of the brain's volume, and altered it's structure, or decreased it's function.

Antidepressants may change all three of these for the better through it's upregulation of neutrophic factors, like BDNF. What's wrong with that?

Let's just say that my NYE festivities forced me to reconsider my lifestyle, and subsequently I was in need of a natural sourced antidepressant, and nootropic. I choose the healthy diet approach.

Nothing like taking depokate, but it's similar to an antidepressant in that my BDNF levels should be raised. Every food and drink (save water) product I consume is designed to increase neuroplasticity.

Cool stuff. Day forty and seem to be making progress!



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:12 PM
link   
Yeah, bummer. After reading the OP, I was ready to order about a ton of it. But, reading the other posts, I’m not so sure now.

I know my brain could definitely use a major boost. The old squirrel cage on my shoulders just don’t seem to work the way it used to. I think the squirrel either died or escaped.

Oh well... Goodbye cruel world - Hello dementia! It’s gonna get wild!



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:13 PM
link   
reply to post by gardener
 


I've been eating this substance for about 15 years, as prescribed by a doctor.

In retrospect, after starting on the substance, I did become a much better student. I became able to learn processes quicker and retain information easier. Prior to that, I was academically less than average. After being prescribed Depakote (valproic acid), my GPA leapt to the top of the class in no time. I have also played musical instruments, from a very young age, but had never really had an ear for it. After starting Depakote, I also learned how to easily recognize musical notes by ear.


I never would have guessed that valproic acid may have been the cause of any of that. I have never really wanted to eat the crap, but now I am reconsidering my view.

I wouldn't suggest going out and getting any of this with the idea of being a better student. It causes a lot of side effects, and it can be highly toxic to the liver. A doctor must be involved. Repeat, do not take this without a doctor watching your blood levels and liver function.




edit on 10 2 2014 by tamusan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:13 PM
link   
I wouldn't take it.
Don't need it.

The human brain is fine the way it is, considering it's not damaged or polluted.

Maybe the point is to convince people to take something that makes them "like a child", you know, easier to parent?
Not to mention the unknown negative effects that are possible.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:15 PM
link   

gardener
Yeah, move over progidies, savants! Son or daughter keeps failing 4th grade? Put em on the pill and they skip grades all the way to college before you know it.

Or, take a few pills to master multiple instruments, professions, pass GRE, GMAT, MCAT, etc top of the class

Why not?


You can do all of that without a pill.

But this "We are all Ultra Lazy" thing or that "I work all the Time" issue gets in the way....



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:17 PM
link   
Just because you can read doesn't mean you can write a book. Point being, they can give you all the information and skills you want - but they can't give you the instinct to wield it like someone who has been practicing for decades.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:20 PM
link   

tamusan
After starting Depakote, I also learned how to easily recognize musical notes by ear.




After getting on my Pepsi habit, I learned about quantum physics.
Pepsi must be good for Learning too ?

Post hoc ergo propter hoc


Post hoc ergo propter hoc (Latin: "after this, therefore because of this") is a logical fallacy (of the questionable cause variety) that states "Since event Y followed event X, event Y must have been caused by event X." It is often shortened to simply post hoc. It is subtly different from the fallacy cum hoc ergo propter hoc (correlation does not imply causation), in which two things or events occur simultaneously or the chronological ordering is insignificant or unknown. Post hoc is a particularly tempting error because temporal sequence appears to be integral to causality. The fallacy lies in coming to a conclusion based solely on the order of events, rather than taking into account other factors that might rule out the connection.


So?

Why couldn't it just be "human brains" are "capable" of learning naturally? And it just takes time for the brain to develop to be able to recognize them precisely ?

Have people been able to achieve the feat without taking the medication historically?



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:20 PM
link   
reply to post by AfterInfinity
 





Just because you can read doesn't mean you can write a book. Point being, they can give you all the information and skills you want - but they can't give you the instinct to wield it like someone who has been practicing for decades.



Well said, I wanted to state something to that effect, but did not have the right words flowing out.



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:22 PM
link   
reply to post by webedoomed
 


It had to do with studies on depressed individuals (with the assumption that depression is 'hard-wired'). The studies were aimed at showing long-term anti-depressant use can increase neurogenesis and modulate signaling pathways involved in plasticity. Thus, re-wiring parts of our brain that are seemingly 'stuck'.

This is just an interest of mine and I can't speak about it as if I know all the in's and out's - the thing is, neither do doctors. Ask a psychiatrist the mechanism of action of any anti-depressant and how it affects mood, they can't tell you - they don't know. It's a crap-shoot of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, etc. Sometimes things 'help' - sometimes they don't. And when you have no idea the long-term effects - it's just not a good route, especially with things like this in thread (taking a medication to improve cognitive function).

Anyway, here is an article you may find of interest:

Anti-depressants and Plasticity



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:26 PM
link   

kalunom
reply to post by webedoomed
 


Ask a psychiatrist the mechanism of action of any anti-depressant and how it affects mood, they can't tell you - they don't know. It's a crap-shoot of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, etc. Sometimes things 'help' - sometimes they don't. And when you have no idea the long-term effects - it's just not a good route, especially with things like this in thread (taking a medication to improve cognitive function).


I can agree with all of this. The US is guini pigs for pharmaceuticals. We have no clue what we're doing to millions of poor souls out there.

This is the reason I have yet to take any nootropics, or pharmaceuticals for any issues that arise over the years. RX free since 2000!



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:26 PM
link   
reply to post by muzzleflash
 






After getting on my Pepsi habit, I learned about quantum physics.
Pepsi must be good for Learning too ?


I understand your point, and I also believe we all respond differently to everything. I would have never believed that I would here, in this thread, saying anything nice about Depakote. I often vomit a little just from smelling it.

I do know that I was unable to easily pass college prior to starting Depakote. I never would have guessed it was the Depakote, and I am still a little skeptical.


edit on 10 2 2014 by tamusan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:26 PM
link   

kalunom
reply to post by webedoomed
 


It had to do with studies on depressed individuals (with the assumption that depression is 'hard-wired').


I am convinced my 'depression' is a result of being appalled by our society in general.

I don't care that people take chemicals really, but I am very disturbed by the widespread belief that it's necessary or improves intelligence or happiness because those are myths.

I'm not ruined emotionally or anything due to the state of reality, but I am not totally pleased either.
Only thing I can do is tell people they don't need it and hope they think about it carefully.



new topics

top topics



 
13
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join