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were my rights violated today???

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posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 03:54 PM
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if this is not in the right forum just move it to BTS please...

anyway, i had a class trip today and on the way back to school, a student said that his phone was taken from him and he did not know who did it...

my religion teacher then got the dean of the school to come into the bus...

as we waited for the dean to come, the driver of the bus closed the door on us to keep us in (i am assuming)

the dean then entered and said that the person who took the phone should confess the act, but he didn't...

the dean then searched each person by patting them down and making us take off our jackets and emptying out pockets etc. (like he was the cop?)

i just wanted to know if this act was legal or not...

also, the dean found some cigarettes and did not care (he only was thinking about the phone)...

if you need more info. just ask...

thank you for your time...

EDIT: i forgot something: no he did not find the phone




[edit on 22-11-2004 by they see ALL]




posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 03:59 PM
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Well did they find the phone? If so, then dont worry about it. Just be pissed that the phone thief violated your privacy...

...am I really responding to this thread? Someone shot me.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:20 PM
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It depends on whether you are part of a school or a concentration camp.

You have a right to be concerned, but I would suggest that policies vary widely and the school would be acting on policy.

How many schools do weapons inspections or random drug testing, out of interest?



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by Simulacra
Well did they find the phone? If so, then dont worry about it. Just be pissed that the phone thief violated your privacy...

...am I really responding to this thread? Someone shot me.


damn i forgot that part...

no he did not find the phone

and why are you shocked that you are posting here???





posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:32 PM
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I guess the question here would be, would YOU want the bus searched if it had been your phone



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
It depends on whether you are part of a school or a concentration camp.

You have a right to be concerned, but I would suggest that policies vary widely and the school would be acting on policy.

How many schools do weapons inspections or random drug testing, out of interest?


well, in the school book i didn't find anything about stealing and the result is a search...

it did say something along the lines of: "when there is a circumstance [stealing, cursing, etc.] that was not discussed [in the handbook], the teacher should act accordingly and do what is neccessary"

now, was this necessary






posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by NetStorm
I guess the question here would be, would YOU want the bus searched if it had been your phone


good question...

yupp, but i don't have a phone






posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 04:44 PM
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I agree, if it was your phone, you wouldn't be complaining right now. Your dean was trying to keep whoever it was from more serious punishment. He could have kept you on the bus, and waited for a police officer, who would have had sufficient probable cause to search you all. Count your blessings. As a side note, my high school had metal detectors, and randomly an announcement would come over our PA system that went something like this. "Teachers, close and lock your classroom doors. Students in the hallways report to the nearest classroom until further notice." And thats when the drug sniffing dogs would be led past every locker in the building.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by Tripnastic
I agree, if it was your phone, you wouldn't be complaining right now. Your dean was trying to keep whoever it was from more serious punishment. He could have kept you on the bus, and waited for a police officer, who would have had sufficient probable cause to search you all. Count your blessings. As a side note, my high school had metal detectors, and randomly an announcement would come over our PA system that went something like this. "Teachers, close and lock your classroom doors. Students in the hallways report to the nearest classroom until further notice." And thats when the drug sniffing dogs would be led past every locker in the building.


sucks...

thats all i have to say






posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:12 PM
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The most important question has not been asked.

Are you, or anyone who was searched, over the age of 18?

If not, you have no case as your parents have assigned "custody" of you to the school. You have no rights. Sorry.

If you are, you have a good basis for a civil suit.

I'm not a lawyer, don't take this as true legal advice. yada yada yada.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by Fry2
The most important question has not been asked.

Are you, or anyone who was searched, over the age of 18?

If not, you have no case as your parents have assigned "custody" of you to the school. You have no rights. Sorry.

If you are, you have a good basis for a civil suit.

I'm not a lawyer, don't take this as true legal advice. yada yada yada.


damnit i am not


well, one kid was, i better tell him to sue the dean tomorow






posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:21 PM
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This would only be a violation of your rights if the person who searched you was a law enforcement officer without probable cause. In many schools, including mine, an administrator is allowed to search students without the same amount of probable cause as an LEO. In fact, at my school, they have an administrator accompany the resource officer so the admin can search the student, and the student gets both legal action and school disciplinary action. Smart, I think, but a little slimy too.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:22 PM
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When you are in school the school is efectivly and legaly your "parent" and as such can do prity much anything a leagal gardean could do.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:48 PM
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I recall being (wrongfully) accused for stealing something, by an adult while in high school,..

Back against the wall,... and being told to empty my pockets,...

I looked him in the eye and told him it will cost him $100 for me to do this,.. as a fee for my inconvenience. (that was big money to me then)


Sure I inherited a label of suspicion,.... but I received no money,... and my person was not violated because of someone's faulty dis-information.


I dont care how old a person is,... they have rights that should protect them from this activity of unwarranted suspicion.

Think about it,.....
Its like that now for adults,...

A policeman pulls you over,... and asks for permission to search the vehicle.

You have the right to say no,...

and you know what happens next.

[edit on 22-11-2004 by smirkley]



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 06:22 PM
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No, what happens next? Because I am the police officer pulling you over...



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 06:28 PM
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Originally posted by Fry2
Are you, or anyone who was searched, over the age of 18?
If not, you have no case as your parents have assigned "custody" of you to the school. You have no rights. Sorry.


You are exactly right! As a minor, and it's pretty shocking, you have very limited rights in a situation such as this. Plus, as another member posted, I belive the dean was actually trying to stop a situation from becoming even uglier.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 06:34 PM
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well if you went to a private school your rights were violated, but! if you go to a catholic , or private school you give up you right when you enter the school the school has the right to search you and your stuff. it sucks, but thats the price you pay to recieve a better education.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 06:51 PM
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Originally posted by smirkley

A policeman pulls you over,... and asks for permission to search the vehicle.

You have the right to say no,...

and you know what happens next.

[edit on 22-11-2004 by smirkley]


Sure you can say no but in this situation why would you? If you have nothing to hide then why stop the officer other than to be difficult. I understand that a search is inconvienent and violating but one has to put themselves in the officers shoes. He/She does not know you and really are just doing their job. You really must ask yourself are you mad that they are searching "you" without (at least you belive) a valid reason. Do you have a problem with them searching others. They do a tough job, for little pay, to try and keep the peace. I for one, when pulled over, kill them with "yes sir" and "no sir" and keep the situation cool so it can be rectified rather quickly and painlessly. I still to this day can't understand why people go that extra mile to be a$$holes in a situation such as this when there is no way you are going to win unless your rights are violated. This is what they are authorized to do by law, paid for by the tax payer, and all in an effort to keep you and I safe.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 07:24 PM
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Well I can see that maybe that was not a good analogy for me to apply to the topic at hand,... as I do see all your valid points in reply.


In reference to what I suggested is basically what the perception that I get when I watch the COPS show on tv,... and sometimes it just doesnt seem appropriate in cases,.. but obviously this is not always the case.

And the part I posted about while in High School,... I have to remember that it has been a 'few' years,.. and public schools are entirely different then they used to be in my day.


But still in retrospect,... the original poster does describe something that seems very concerning to me.


and yes,.. I may be a bit biased as I recall a couple of times as a youth that I had 'nothing to hide' yet found myself on the side of the road explaining why I would be driving down this street or whatever. (factual)

But ,... must I be mad,... or not concerned about other's,... quite the opposite actually. You cannot deny my right to personal privacy for any unwarranted suspicion, and I need not satisfy that position without reasonable cause for such inquiry.

Yes, these days are filled with more uncertanty and danger for the police, and I will and have always respected the arm of the law and never been a butt-head when addressing or being addressed by such. It appears to me that the current state of crime in American society, is 'the' reason some must accept their guilt before proven innocent in whatwever circumstance that may otherwise be unfounded.

None the less, it looks like there is good cause to search ALL students, cars, homes, etc.

[edit on 22-11-2004 by smirkley]



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by smirkley

But still in retrospect,... the original poster does describe something that seems very concerning to me.


I agree it is disturbing when rights are violated or borderline violated such as in this case which is why we must be ever vigilant in keeping these things in the light. I kind of went off on a rant there about the police but it angers me sometimes to hear people always portary them in a bad light (not saying that you were but it is a common practice today). I just wish people would put themselves in their shoes and see how they would handle certain situations.





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