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My God! It's Full Of Stars!

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posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 07:40 PM
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jaffo
Only on ATS do the same folks who claim they see statues on NASA pictures taken from the surface of Mars also try and say that NASA photos taken on Mars are actually fakes. Because, logic.


That's long been a trope of the Apollo Hoax crowd: "They never went - It was totally faked on a sound stage and while they were there they saw teh saucerz and they warned us never to come back!!1!





posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


So, we leave our sky, fly 99 million miles through the sky to discover distant worlds, and point our camera's back up to the sky, to view our very own sky. Am I right?
'Perhaps the programmers of the programme haven't figured out how the stars are suppose to look from such a distant viewpoint'. What if they get one or two of the multi-billion stars wrong, then we will know for sure, for now, its to risky, so they give us this balderdash. I am all down with seeing what we need to see, what the frigg these star formations in the sky really mean and just how do i fit in. Speaking of which, can anyone link any truly magnificent pictures of our mother earth from say, 10 million miles away, 20 million, 1 million, id love to see



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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I have often wondered why no stars are visible in videos from the Space Shuttles, Space Station, or the old videos from the Moon for that matter. No astronaut has ever spoken about how in awe he/she was while viewing millions of stars from above the Earth. Could it be that you need the magnifying effects of an atmosphere to see the heavens with the naked eye?
-cwm



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by carewemust
 


I have often wondered why no stars are visible in videos from the Space Shuttles, Space Station, or the old videos from the Moon for that matter.
With the right camera settings they are.




No astronaut has ever spoken about how in awe he/she was while viewing millions of stars from above the Earth.
The only difference in stars seen from a viewpoint in space with those seen from the surface of Earth is that they don't twinkle. Get away from light pollution and you'll see pretty much what you would see in space.


Could it be that you need the magnifying effects of an atmosphere to see the heavens with the naked eye?
The atmosphere doesn't magnify anything.

edit on 2/10/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 2/10/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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You can barely see the earth, what makes you think you would be able to see a star in that pic(they are farther away from the earths distance frim mars)?



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage, that's the first video I've seen from space that contains STARS...and lots of them. Kudos and thanks for finding/posting that ISS clip so quickly and for clarifying that the atmosphere has no magnification properties. I was thinking like a fish in a fishbowl looking out, LOL.
-cwm



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:13 PM
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You do know I have a thread with the SAME EXACT title?

"My God, its full of stars!"

GMTA

edit on 2/10/2014 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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HomerinNC
You do know I have a thread with the SAME EXACT title?

"My God, its full of stars!"

GMTA

edit on 2/10/2014 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)


Maybe you can speak to this forum's ATS moderator and propose a merger. It is their destiny to be together, it would seem. :-)
-cwm



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 04:46 AM
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DarthPhobos
'Perhaps the programmers of the programme haven't figured out how the stars are suppose to look from such a distant viewpoint'. What if they get one or two of the multi-billion stars wrong, then we will know for sure, for now, its to risky, so they give us this balderdash.

Considering that all stars are many light years away from us, the distance from Earth to Mars is insignificant in comparison. If you were standing on Mars and looking up at the night sky, stars would look pretty much identical to how they look from Earth. It's like taking a picture of mountains many miles away, then taking a little step to the side and taking a picture again.


DarthPhobosSpeaking of which, can anyone link any truly magnificent pictures of our mother earth from say, 10 million miles away, 20 million, 1 million, id love to see.

From 6.2 million miles away: www.planetary.org...
From 31 million miles away: apod.nasa.gov...

The most magnificent pictures of the Earth were taken from the Moon, and on the way to the Moon. For example, from Apollo 8:


See more pictures of Earth from distant spacecraft here: planetary.org...

~~~


carewemust
I have often wondered why no stars are visible in videos from the Space Shuttles, Space Station, or the old videos from the Moon for that matter. No astronaut has ever spoken about how in awe he/she was while viewing millions of stars from above the Earth. Could it be that you need the magnifying effects of an atmosphere to see the heavens with the naked eye?
-cwm

It's all about camera exposure. In the videos and pictures you have seen that don't have stars, the subject is lit by the Sun, or by light reflected from the sunlit Earth and spacecraft. Stars are very faint, but it's strange how many people don't realise that. They also forget that there is the Sun, the blindingly bright source of light, shining on everything in the Solar System.

Astronauts did report seeing stars. Anousheh Ansari (a space tourist) describes them as diamond dust sprinkled over black velvet. An Apollo astronaut in the Command Module was over the dark side of the Moon, and looking out into space saw so many stars that he couldn't recognise the familiar constellations.

And as the video posted earlier shows, with a long exposure setting (and being over the night side of the Earth!) it is possible to film of photograph stars.

~~~


HomerinNC
You do know I have a thread with the SAME EXACT title?

"My God, its full of stars!"

GMTA

edit on 2/10/2014 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)

The title is the same, the subject is totally different. Don't troll.

edit on 11-2-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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DarthPhobos
reply to post by MysterX
 


So, we leave our sky, fly 99 million miles through the sky to discover distant worlds, and point our camera's back up to the sky, to view our very own sky. Am I right?
'Perhaps the programmers of the programme haven't figured out how the stars are suppose to look from such a distant viewpoint'. What if they get one or two of the multi-billion stars wrong, then we will know for sure, for now, its to risky, so they give us this balderdash. I am all down with seeing what we need to see, what the frigg these star formations in the sky really mean and just how do i fit in. Speaking of which, can anyone link any truly magnificent pictures of our mother earth from say, 10 million miles away, 20 million, 1 million, id love to see


Actually, yes there are such pictures. We got some really cool shots from orbit of Saturn recently. Google.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 





The title is the same, the subject is totally different. Don't troll.


Wasnt trolling, was making a comment, as I thought it was funny.
Quit trying to assume things and stop pot stirring



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 




An Apollo astronaut in the Command Module was over the dark side of the Moon, and looking out into space saw so many stars that he couldn't recognise the familiar constellations.


That is because he was looking through the power optics of the navigation computer system, a device built by the Kollsman Instrument Corp. It, like the Vidicons they used to use, and picked up all the UV light given off by the Suns UV energy striking the ice particles from a waste dump. Those particles surrounded the spacecraft and travelled along with it in a cloud. The millions of stars he saw were not stars but ice crystals, and the crew joked about that fact right from the earliest Apollo missions, it's in the transcripts.
The audio is available at this site. Listen to it all the way through.
Audio: Al Worden on the view from the back side of the Moon and the scale of the universe.
boingboing.net...

Anousheh Ansari never went out on an EVA, and from the space station you can not see into deep space, only the band of atmosphere around the Earth, which is where stars can be seen, as it is the same atmosphere that allows us to see the stars from Earth.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 07:51 PM
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GaryN
Al Worden on the view from the back side of the Moon and the scale of the universe.
boingboing.net...

From your link:

Avi: What's the view from the back of the moon?

Al: There are two things that are important: there's the back side of the moon and there's the dark side to the moon. They are two different things. The back side is the side away from the earth and the dark side is the side away from the sun. So they're not the same thing. On our flight the moon was about half lit, so there was about half a moon. So there was a little space around the back side as I was going around it where I was shadowed from both the Earth and the Sun and that was pretty amazing. I could see more stars than I could possibly imagine. It really makes you wonder about our place in the Universe and what we're all about. When you see that many stars out there you realize that those are really suns and those suns could have planets around them and all that kind of stuff.


Avi: Could you see the outline of the milky way or were there just too many stars?

Al: Too many stars, Avi, yes. As you know we're part of the milky way galaxy and we look at it sideways, we look through it. When there's so many stars that you look at out there it's very hard to make out anything like a milky way or anything like that. In fact, there were so many stars I had some difficulty finding any of the 37 brighter stars that we used as navigation stars because they were so bathed in starlight from the other stars around them.

Avi: So, for example, you would try and find Sirius and...

Al: ...and it would be very difficult to find. And there were times when I had to let the computer drive the optics to the star that I wanted to use for navigation because I had difficulty finding it with all the other stars out there.

That doesn't sound like he was talking about ice debris floating around the Apollo spacecarft. He says he saw real stars, and I have no reason to believe he was lying, or that he meant the ice debris around his spacecraft. Stop trying to twist facts in favour of your theory.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 11:53 PM
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My advice is to experiment in some astrophotography read up on some physics and astronomy then things like this will soon loose their mystery trust me you’ll gain insight into the universe which is a lot better than living in ignorance.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 12:13 AM
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I see plenty of stars. The exposure setting and editing makes them barely visible, but zoom in and you'll notice tons of lighter pinpoints all over the sky in those images.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 08:57 AM
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AndyMayhew
Here's a picture taken from Earth of the Moon and Venus. AND OH MY GOD THERE ARE NO STARS!!!!



It's all down to exposure. As has been pointed out time and time and time again whenever non photographers question photos of stars or the Moon etc. You need a long exposure to capture distant stars, but that means over exposure of closer, brighter objects like planets or the Moon. So you adjust the exposure according to what it is you are photographing. Maybe a bit of background research before making yourself look silly next time? Girls go for clever guys, not ignorant ones

edit on 8-2-2014 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)


you have been fortunate just to keep the moon in this picture, a 35 kb picture is roughy 11x worst quality than the pictures from curiosity, im surprised that venus hasn't been erased by jpg compression, the moon up close looks like an guest appearance from 8 bit land
.. if your hoping to see stars in this picture , there was never a chance

funBox



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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He says he saw real stars, and I have no reason to believe he was lying, or that he meant the ice debris around his spacecraft. Stop trying to twist facts in favour of your theory.
reply to post by wildespace
 


I think we need to try and get Chris Hadfield to do an interview for ATS, maybe that Oberg guy could use his connections to arrange such? Or any other of the EVA astronauts would do, but I can not find one out of the dozens who have been out there who mention seeing anything, and that includes all those who were out there for hours on end when they were building the ISS, who musy have had unrestricted views in every direction.
No mention anywhere of seeing the stars, or the planets or even the Moon. None of them have given talks, or written books about the view of the heavens, they just don't mention it. I'd expect to hear something like " Yeah, when we took a couple of minutes for a rest, and we turned towards deep space, we could see the Moon come up, the Moonlight is really bright out there, and Venus was just to the right of the Moon. The Milky way is incredible, and the stars so bright that even without the Moon you can still see to work OK. Yep, that is some awesome view out there."
No, there is nothing like that anywhere, only silence. Lets hear straight from someone who has been out there and end all this speculation once and for all. I'll believe Chris Hadfield unless someone steps forward to counter what he says.



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Thank you for taking the time to answer my query's. Much Appreciated



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 11:37 PM
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GaryN



He says he saw real stars, and I have no reason to believe he was lying, or that he meant the ice debris around his spacecraft. Stop trying to twist facts in favour of your theory.
reply to post by wildespace
 


I think we need to try and get Chris Hadfield to do an interview for ATS, maybe that Oberg guy could use his connections to arrange such? Or any other of the EVA astronauts would do, but I can not find one out of the dozens who have been out there who mention seeing anything, and that includes all those who were out there for hours on end when they were building the ISS, who musy have had unrestricted views in every direction.
No mention anywhere of seeing the stars, or the planets or even the Moon. None of them have given talks, or written books about the view of the heavens, they just don't mention it. I'd expect to hear something like " Yeah, when we took a couple of minutes for a rest, and we turned towards deep space, we could see the Moon come up, the Moonlight is really bright out there, and Venus was just to the right of the Moon. The Milky way is incredible, and the stars so bright that even without the Moon you can still see to work OK. Yep, that is some awesome view out there."
No, there is nothing like that anywhere, only silence. Lets hear straight from someone who has been out there and end all this speculation once and for all. I'll believe Chris Hadfield unless someone steps forward to counter what he says.


Iranan astronaut Anousheh Ansari, from her blog:

www.anoushehansari.com...



But that is not the best part. The best part and by far my favorite view up here is the view of the universe at night. The stars up here are unbelievable… It looks like someone has spread diamond dust over a black velvet blanket. The Milky Way is easily visible… like a rainbow of stars over the entire earth… I cannot keep my eyes off of them I put my head to the window and stay there until the coldness of the glass gives me a headache… then I pull my head back a little and continue gazing out.



posted on Feb, 14 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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I put my head to the window and stay there until the coldness of the glass gives me a headache…
reply to post by onebigmonkey
 


The field of view from the Earth facing window does not allow for seeing out into deep space, only a band of Earths atmosphere arpound the edges of Earth. Yes the stars are visible through that layer of atmosphere, just as they are from Earth. There are no back windows on the ISS that allow for a view of deep space, only an EVA astronaut can look away from the Earth, and the only one I can find who has talked about the view into deep space says it is totally black. I believe him until someone comes forward to challenge his statement.



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