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Illegal Now For Homeless To Use Blankets?

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posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 06:41 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by snypwsd
 


"They" are so human that if the roles were reversed, nothing would change.

Yes, "poor people" tend to be more giving. But remove that poor state from their finances, and they become the same scumbags that we are decrying here.

Behavior is 10% individual outlook, and 90% human nature.


Noting that this post is not very popular in this thread (yes, i get it...we need to bash those evil politicians for trying to screw the good guys around)....

Let me share some insight into human nature. Using the following study, done on behaviors during a game that has destroyed families for decades: Monopoly.

www.pbs.org...


PAUL PIFF: We’re playing a game of Monopoly that’s rigged.

PAUL SOLMAN: This game is typical of another kind of experiment Piff likes to run. Instead of studying actual rich people, Piff gets subjects to feel rich in the lab. The designated Monopoly moneybags starts with a few legs up, $2,000 dollars vs. the poor man’s $1,000 dollars, an upscale playing piece the Rolls vs. an old shoe, the right to toss two dice instead of just one.

Two. I have got snake eyes — meaning I, assigned the role of rich person, get an extra turn.

So, but I roll again, because I have got …

PAUL PIFF: Yes, because you rolled doubles.

PAUL SOLMAN: Doubles. Six. One, two, three, four, five, six, and that’s Tennessee Avenue, and, of course, I will buy that.

Meanwhile, poor Paul Piff.

PAUL PIFF: I only get to roll one die. And as it says here, when I pass go, I collect a lower salary. I collect $100 dollars.

PAUL SOLMAN: Here’s your one die.

PAUL PIFF: Great. Thanks so much. I can’t roll doubles. I don’t get opportunities to move very far along the board.

PAUL SOLMAN: Piff has run this experiment with hundreds of people on the Berkeley campus. The rich players are determined randomly by coin toss, the game rigged so they cannot lose. And yet, says Piff, despite their presumably liberal bent going in …

PAUL PIFF: When we asked them afterwards, how much do you feel like you deserved to win the game? The rich people felt entitled. They felt like they deserved to win the game. And that’s a really incredible insight into what the mind does to make sense of advantage or disadvantage.

PAUL SOLMAN: So, even though a subject like myself is just play-acting — you consistently find that I begin to attribute success to myself, even though it’s a coin flip that got me on this side of the board as opposed to that?

PAUL PIFF: You, like a real rich person, start to attribute success to your own individual skills and talents, and you become less attuned to all of the other things that contributed to you being in the position that you’re in.


Long story short: they found that people who were wealthy in real life were much more fluid in their ethics, choosing to lie/steal/cheat far more often than the lowest earners in real life. So to remove that "real life" factor, they played Monopoly and infused arbitrary rules so that the "rich" person in the game was rigged and determined on a coin toss. By the end of the game, people who in real life were not wealthy would tend to exhibit the same core traits as mentioned above by real life wealthy people.

Long story even shorter: just about every one of us would be a douche is put in a position of influence and affluence. It is human nature. When you decry those evil city council members, you are looking in the mirror while doing so.

Just food for thought.




posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 06:56 PM
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Florida...



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:16 PM
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Now that i am not just homeless anymore

But i am a working homeless person i would like to tell many of you in this thread

You are wrong

And i hope you are faced with these hard choices soon as our society deteriorates

And i hope you suffer

Badly

Some of use want to improve our state of affairs

But you make it so damn hard

Then blame us

Choke



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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Another_Nut
Now that i am not just homeless anymore

But i am a working homeless person i would like to tell many of you in this thread

You are wrong

And i hope you are faced with these hard choices soon as our society deteriorates

And i hope you suffer

Badly

Some of use want to improve our state of affairs

But you make it so damn hard

Then blame us

Choke


Not trying to rain on your pity parade here....but exactly who are the "many in this thread" you are talking about? Every single post in this thread, minus 1 by a Brit who doesn't like the mentally ill homeless panhandling in the "city centre", should be in complete agreement with your position.

Perhaps impulsive behavior, and outbursts, might be holding you back a little?
At least, as evidenced here in your prior post.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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I lived in Florida for about a year. Way down south, the end of the road. One day it got cold, 50 degrees, and someone said they needed a blanket, so I gave the person a sleeping bag. The next day when I collected it, it had been pissed all over, or something, by a whole bunch of people. They left it near the old hangman's square. I threw it away, a little sad that a fellow homeless person would have done such a thing. I guess they didn't need it anymore, since it was, after all, summer, and 50 degrees was a rare dip in temperature in those parts.

So maybe, just maybe, the blankets become abandoned, and create an eyesore?

Another time, we heard about a 'cool lawyer' who said we could use his yard to sleep. In the morning, there was a brace of cops awaiting us, who couldn't wait for me to get dressed as they snatched my remaining sleeping bag. But I did get to keep it. They gave it back.

Maybe they figure that if you need a blanket, it's because you have 'something to hide'?


The guy in the linked article looks like 'Richard', who had a cat, many cuts and scratches on his arms at all times, and a bit more hair. He did his 'business' inside drainage tunnels, where he felt safe from the tethered blimps, eyes in the sky, which were everywhere. This was a long time ago. In reality, I doubt he lasted this long. There were persons in our group being jailed, for fabricated reasons, losing their minds behind bars. One minute he was preaching about 'The Lord', naked, the next he is in jail, having nervous breakdowns. One guy, who was quite level headed, from way up north, had even claimed that a TV had been put in his head....

It's a rough little place, if you are homeless, but the weather is nice. On any given night, you might find a twenty on the street, a yacht party, or a speeding bullet. About all I have to remind me are a few red beads from a 'rain stick', that were offered to me for a flower, by some eco-freak whose goal was to take a trip, on a raft made of trash, around the world; a piece of shattered catlinite, and a clay dove medallion made by a Hungarian Dread who always let me use his drum. I remember his last words to me: See you in the Sun.


# 139

edit on 7-2-2014 by TheWhiteKnight because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by snypwsd
 


I agree with your ideas... My only issue with it is that they have to want what you're proposing. I worked at an adult crisis home and a majority of the people who lived there cycled in and out of the system of their own free will, only wanting to be off the streets long enough to eat and maybe clean up or sleep a bit. Within a couple of days they would AWOL and then they'd be back in a few weeks.

Some really wanted help, but most did not. For whatever reason, they had their routine and they liked it.

So what do you do with the homeless who don't WANT to not be homeless anymore?

Just something to think about.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by SilverStarGazer
 


i too have worked with the homeless and am wll aware of the cycle they go through. i think it is because they don't get the full help they actually need.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I think you should reread

I won't name names

And more are coming

Watch

Eta and of i am wrong i will have no problem apologizing

After all i am crashing your state

edit on pm220142807America/ChicagoFri, 07 Feb 2014 19:48:28 -0600_2000000 by Another_Nut because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by SilverStarGazer
 





I agree with your ideas... My only issue with it is that they have to want what you're proposing. I worked at an adult crisis home and a majority of the people who lived there cycled in and out of the system of their own free will, only wanting to be off the streets long enough to eat and maybe clean up or sleep a bit. Within a couple of days they would AWOL and then they'd be back in a few weeks.


I struggled with this too when I was working with the homeless. Of course if you work with them you want to see them succeed and you work to try and increase the number that do. But ultimately, even if they refuse or unable to transition out of that world, I don't think the efforts are wasted.

Some people, for various reasons, just don't thrive. None the less, I still think they're owed a little compassion.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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This is Pensacola and I feel sickened about this!


It is about the revitalization of the core downtown district with a new Ballpark the new home the double-A Blue-Wahoos. They moved and destroyed the old water-front mission and moved it out into the county in one of the worst aeas.

Money talks and then there is Pensacola old money that gets away with everything.

I am truly ashamed to call this place my 2nd home.




posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by sirric
 


like it.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 09:18 PM
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jrod
Also if arrested most homeless will get an automatic 30days in jail because they can not afford to be bailed out.


Well this is really sad to say, but at least they have food and shelter in jail. I think it's awful that people are discouraged from lending a hand to a destitute fellow-human. What a sad, sad world we live in.



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:26 AM
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TheConspiracyPages
reply to post by SilverStarGazer
 





I agree with your ideas... My only issue with it is that they have to want what you're proposing. I worked at an adult crisis home and a majority of the people who lived there cycled in and out of the system of their own free will, only wanting to be off the streets long enough to eat and maybe clean up or sleep a bit. Within a couple of days they would AWOL and then they'd be back in a few weeks.


I struggled with this too when I was working with the homeless. Of course if you work with them you want to see them succeed and you work to try and increase the number that do. But ultimately, even if they refuse or unable to transition out of that world, I don't think the efforts are wasted.

Some people, for various reasons, just don't thrive. None the less, I still think they're owed a little compassion.



I hope no one took my post as me not having compassion for the homeless! I ABSOLUTELY do! I just wanted to give a little insight since I have a lot of first-hand experience.

I have been guilty in the past of trying to help people that really didn't want it bc I could see the potential they had in them. It's really the same with many of the issues that we as humans face... It doesn't matter how much I want someone to do something or how great I think they can be... It's up to THEM to willingly accept the help being offered.

There were many times that I offered to help certain people personally outside of my normal work duties, whether it was giving them clothes or a ride on my way out of work. I really wanted to help people, that's why I chose that profession... It certainly wasn't for the paycheck, at least above barely keeping myself from being homeless! I was disappointed more often than not, but there were people that I did truly help and that was a great feeling.

I think society in general needs a paradigm shift in how we view and treat those less fortunate. Everyone has a story, and are human, no matter how much some would like to paint them as something less than that. We live in such abundance and excess, yet there are men, women, and children right here in AMERICA with no homes, that are hungry, and are cast aside by society. People will say, as someone did earlier in this thread, they are more than happy to feed them, just not in their own town. Wtf is that? IMO that rails hard against "Denying Ignorance".

If there's nothing else to be taken from my post... Please do not turn your backs on those who society has marginalized. You could very easily end up there yourself. No one plans to be homeless, or a drug addict... Have compassion for your fellow humans. There's enough oppression in this world... Do we really need to perpetuate it? There is no reason why anyone should go hungry or be homeless but we are tricked into believing that those that are in that situation somehow deserve to live like animals and that it's all their fault so why should we care let alone lend a helping hand? That is a sick way of thinking, and I truly hope that no one here EVER has to go through such an ordeal.

I have seen the depravity of humanity up close and personal... It is heartbreaking.

Take care...



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:38 AM
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I donate plasma twice a week so I can avoid becoming homeless and I truly feel for them. The place I go to donate plasma is right in the middle of the poorest section of town so I see homeless people all the time. Some are sleeping on benches and some are meeting with other homeless people sharing the days news. I wish I was a rich man so I could give them enough for food and maybe shelter.



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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jrod
I am from Florida and I can tell you many cities are very anti-homeless. For example in Tampa you can get arrested for feeding a homeless person. There are a plethora of laws that give LEOs a bunch of reasons they can arrest a homeless person. Also if arrested most homeless will get an automatic 30days in jail because they can not afford to be bailed out. 30 days is how long the state has to formally charge someone if in custody for a misdemeanor, since most homeless have a weak case against them the state often will drop the charges after 30 days and that person is released from jail.

That said because there are so many homeless in Florida there are also a lot of charities that cater to the homeless.
edit on 7-2-2014 by jrod because: (no reason given)


If this is true, how much money is the state wasting on locking up the homeless for 30 days? What is the cost in man hours spent arresting them, administration fees, legal fees, the cost to keep them in jail, feed them while they are there, etc? It seems like a better use of that money would be helping the homeless, instead of shuffling them in and out of jail?

Sick world we live in. What is even sicker is that there are actually people out there who don't give a rats ass. They view the less fortunate as sub-human. Not even worth the price of one of their daily latte's to show a bit of charity or kindness here and there.




posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


You my friend are missing the point, I said take money out of government. Im not just talking about election money, I am talking about the money they earn as well. If you get rid of the money factor you get rid of the greed. who is going to be more humble... a politician making 30 grand or a politician that makes 130 grand a year?



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:57 AM
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It seems that when politicians outlaw the means to keep oneself alive, they are in reality pronouncing a death sentence upon you. I think the entire state should have a "blanket day" where everyone walks everywhere with a blanket on them. See how long the law lasts then.
The poor you have with you always. (Matt. 26:11) Anyone recall the tent cities called Hoovervilles?



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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tinner07
Ok here is my perspective on that.

I live in Michigan, snowing to beat hell. I want to vacation in florida but can't afford the resorts. Can I set up tent in your front yard? No.


Are your options, death?

Sure. I'll give you the front yard. Unless I break any laws about having an untidy garden now tho, you know, these laws, are made to protect how pretty things are, human life can get lost.


Business owners are the same. People have compassion but you get people sleeping in front of a business its going to hurt business.


Reads about making it illegal to be homeless, complains business are sad.



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 01:04 AM
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taoistguy
reply to post by tinner07
 


we, it's getting closer to them being made illegal.
get out of town? where???

sad, so very sad. :\



He doesn't care. A river for all he cares. A creek bed. Up a tree. Just away from him. My god, don't you have any compassion? He has to look at the damned things. Homeless people carry rabies and hobos and all sorts of diseases. So when they go sleepy sleepies at nigh nigh it's time for them to pack up and turn into a pumpkin.



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 01:05 AM
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Antigod
reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


Hmm, at the risk of being really unpopular.

ok



The majority of homeless people in the Uk have real mental health problems and/or substance abouse issues, which is what puts them on the streets. You really need ways to contain them. The sane, non criminal ones are a minority. You need to find a way to discourage them from hanging around in the city centres and bugging the straights.


it's Homeless people, not homosexuals.

edit on 8-2-2014 by sn0rch because: (no reason given)



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