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Man who killed an officer in no-knock warrant will not be charged with murder

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posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by RomeByFire
 


Just giving an example of a situation where i'm sure you people wont see things the same way.

Police are not precogs after all and you people dont seem to care too much for the safety of people giving a service that everyone enjoys, yes some are bad and some are criminals but come on. the safety of criminals is more important that the ones making a dangerous job yay

if i were a cop and in a meeting was determinate the safest course of action were no knock search ill do it too


Good night people i hope someone else comes and take my place so you could keep paddling yourself in the back




posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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Indigent
reply to post by _BoneZ_
 


So lets say a man hold hostage a kid inside his home, police have to knock on the door to rescue the hostage?

its ok you people dont like my point of view, you could also ignore it if its such an stupidity
edit on 6-2-2014 by Indigent because: missed on


That isn't an issue where a warrant is needed to come into the house....?? This about a man in his private residence and people breaking in and him being in fear for his life. Cops need to announce them self's for a reason, it is for their safety. Guarantee you do this to any active LEO residence and similar results will happen, since most of them are armed and have itchy trigger fingers.

And then this guy gets hit with an unnecessary felony because of prohibition, got to get him somewhere right.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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Indigent
So lets say a man hold hostage a kid inside his home, police have to knock on the door to rescue the hostage?

That's not even a comparable scenario. Someone in a hostage situation knows that the police will try to get to him and he will expect it.

This person did not know who was coming through his door. So he had the right to defend his life and property. And the grand jury saw it that way also.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


The Hunger Games, Last Resort, Revolution, all this bad cop news and people getting away with violent crimes, just makes me think a controlled revolt is in motion.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 05:27 PM
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Indigent
reply to post by _BoneZ_
 


So lets say a man hold hostage a kid inside his home, police have to knock on the door to rescue the hostage?

its ok you people dont like my point of view, you could also ignore it if its such an stupidity
edit on 6-2-2014 by Indigent because: missed on


If anyone calls you stupid for your point of view, i will defend you.

That said, when you share your point of view people will want to discuss it. Whether you choose to engage in that discussion is your choice obviously.

I would guess that you are not natural born American? If that is true, you may be missing out on the more unruly aspects of our culture. One is, out in the country we live by country rules. Rule #1: no trespassing. You will be shot.

Truly rural sheriffs typically understand that folks who live outside of the city do so for a reason. And they typically handle them differently than no knocking. Matter of fact, many places with the real dangerous people will be booby trapped and will likely cost a couple of lives before they ever even get to the door (a crazy out in Odessa was like that last year).



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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Indigent
I'm shocked about this, the reason they used for a no-knock search was the guy was dangerous, in the end it was true as he killed an officer.

I dont know its just weird to me.


Anybody can be dangerous when you kick open their door with no warning.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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strongfp
reply to post by buni11687
 


It's going to be unfortunate tho. He will be harassed by the local law enforcement until he moves out of town.
Although, I am sort of on the fence on this one as well. When police go in for a no knock warrant usually they go in screaming, POLICE, POLICE! They just don't kindly open the door and tip-toe around.
There have been home invasions where the criminals pose as law enforcement, yelling POLICE, POLICE, while wearing LEO style gear. Sorry, can't trust that.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan

Indigent
I'm shocked about this, the reason they used for a no-knock search was the guy was dangerous, in the end it was true as he killed an officer.

I dont know its just weird to me.


He WAS dangerous. As he damn well should have been while defending his home.

Come in my home without knocking, and I am pretty dangerous, too.
Damn right, furry!



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:40 PM
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Indigent
reply to post by _BoneZ_
 


So lets say a man hold hostage a kid inside his home, police have to knock on the door to rescue the hostage?

its ok you people dont like my point of view, you could also ignore it if its such an stupidity
edit on 6-2-2014 by Indigent because: missed on
Standard procedure in a hostage situation WOULD NOT include a no knock anything. Are you being serious??



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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We believe this man may be dangerous and have weapon so our best bet would be to surprise him at dawn with a no-knock paramilitary raid, right?

-RIGHT!




Apparently common sense is genetic and there's a breeding population out there ruining it for mankind right now.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 08:51 PM
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Good for him. A cop would be alive today, if it weren't for idiotic police procedures. A 'No Knock' permit is a death sentence to these cops. They should really consider modifying their procedures before another idiot cop gets himself killed. No knock warrants are completely unnecessary. They've never been needed in the past, they're not needed now.
edit on 6-2-2014 by Visitor2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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The weirdest part of this whole scenario is, the cops had to have had a meeting first thing in the morning about how to handle this scary bad guy they suspected had drugs and weapons... and after a discussion, they decided to blow into his house at a time he would be expected to be asleep, with lots of screaming and yelling and confusion, instead of a nice calm knock on the door during daylight hours, and serving a search warrant.

And no one in the police strategy meeting apparently brought up the real possibility that waking someone up who is considered 'dangerous' and might have a weapon, could end up being rather unpleasant for at least the first guy in the door. Did they discuss 'who first?'; did the dead guy volunteer or did they draw straws?

Darwin in action. It never ceases to amaze me the ways people end up collecting their Darwin awards.

And meanwhile, the citizens of this hapless town will end up paying the widow's death benefit money for this stupidity, not to mention all the court costs and lawyer fees.

Note to LEOs who have evidence to believe that some 'bad guy with guns and drugs' is holing up in a house, with or without family or hostages present: I'm sure there are ways to gas the people inside, put them harmlessly to sleep, and then take care of the situation that way. Woulda worked at Waco...



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by signalfire
 


well, i certainly would not wish death on anyone (not that you are, mind you...just qualifying my own upcoming statements), but there is a level of justice in this case.

my sister in law and her husband are both prison guards. I make no qualms about how i feel about their jobs. I like them, they are good people. But i find their jobs reprehensible. I don't make issue of it, but have mentioned my distaste for a ob where humans are given charge over other people (to the point of being able to "toss their cell" and mess with their personal effects), using my name to validate their actions (as i am part of the power of the state as a citizen), and hold people captive for commiting "crimes" that aren't crimes. Most of their prisoners are illegals that had drugs on them when they were pulled over.

It seems that officers who engage in the prosecution of our social crimes are a good place to sow the seeds of change. Not that I condone shooting/killing anyone. But for the love of God...they raided his house and did all that in the name of siezing a plant. One that has been made legal in other parts of this country. It is just so, so stupid.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 10:08 PM
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facelift
reply to post by Indigent
 


I'm shocked about this, the reason they used for a no-knock search was the guy was dangerous, in the end it was true as he killed an officer.


Shocked that someone dangerous shot an intruder..?


In the end, it would appear your perception is skewed.




In my home state if a cop doesn't knock you have every right to open fire on them even if they have a no knock warrant. They have to announce they are coming in and that they have a warrant.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:46 PM
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As has already been pointed out, there are cases where intruders have busted down a door yelling police and even wearing police uniforms or what looked like police uniforms. No knock warrants are nothing but asking for trouble. I would figure that people should have figured out by now that your doors into your home don't open inwards. It puts a damper on the no knock when your battering ram can't bust the door.

Also since the cops like to wear black combat uniforms, combat helmets, carry military weapons and cover their faces, that means they are terrorists no matter what they call themselves or have written on their ballistic vests.

Not charging this man is the proper thing but then to continue to charge him for the other things when this level of force was clearly unwarranted is a travesty of the US legal system. There is no justice there, just injustice done over minor issues.

To answer one posters question regarding Waco. Why didn't they just arrest David C. when he was downtown buying items the same day they raided his place? Even he asked that question. Did it ever occur there were other reasons and that they had nothing to do with what they claimed? Also found to be false. You now have no knock warrants and law enforcement can murder people and not get charged thanks to Ruby Ridge and Waco. But should you defend yourself, they will kill you or throw you in prison and lose the key.

Bravo to this jury for seeing at least some of the light.

edit on 2/6/2014 by pstrron because: minor corrections and add a little.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 12:33 AM
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signalfire
The weirdest part of this whole scenario is, the cops had to have had a meeting first thing in the morning about how to handle this scary bad guy they suspected had drugs and weapons... and after a discussion, they decided to blow into his house at a time he would be expected to be asleep, with lots of screaming and yelling and confusion, instead of a nice calm knock on the door during daylight hours, and serving a search warrant.

And no one in the police strategy meeting apparently brought up the real possibility that waking someone up who is considered 'dangerous' and might have a weapon, could end up being rather unpleasant for at least the first guy in the door. Did they discuss 'who first?'; did the dead guy volunteer or did they draw straws?

Darwin in action. It never ceases to amaze me the ways people end up collecting their Darwin awards.

And meanwhile, the citizens of this hapless town will end up paying the widow's death benefit money for this stupidity, not to mention all the court costs and lawyer fees.

Note to LEOs who have evidence to believe that some 'bad guy with guns and drugs' is holing up in a house, with or without family or hostages present: I'm sure there are ways to gas the people inside, put them harmlessly to sleep, and then take care of the situation that way. Woulda worked at Waco...


Agreed i dont think the police should ever enter without letting someone know thats just incredibly stupid. They use the argument its safer however i would say they have the man power to deal with it much safer for all involved if they simply inform them.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 12:38 AM
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It shows how faulty and dangerous having the law is, allowing no knock entries is anyways. The police thought just by virtue that this law excusing what they were doing was somehow a shield to losing all common sense.
Glad he wasn't charged. It was in fact an accident of mistaken identity. I think anyone can see that, or should be able to. Except prosecutors who just want convictions.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 05:09 AM
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reply to post by buni11687
 


Does anyone find it a little disconcerting that if this same incident happened in Colorado or Washington state...he would of been charged with... nothing.



posted on Feb, 7 2014 @ 05:30 AM
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AprilFooseball
reply to post by buni11687
 


Does anyone find it a little disconcerting that if this same incident happened in Colorado or Washington state...he would of been charged with... nothing.


If it was in either of those states, there's a very good chance this wouldn't of even occurred. No resources lost, and the officer would still be alive today.

There is zero reason to risk life and limb over something as minor as a plant.

ETA - Also, look at what some of the LEO's are saying in the PoliceOne link in the OP. There's a bit of a divide on opinions there, in regards to these "no-knock" warrants.
edit on 7-2-2014 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)



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