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Subway to remove chemical from bread

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posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:06 AM
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Chemicals?? From Subway bread?? I thought Subway was the healthy alternative?? Wasn't Jared out there to convince us all of the safety and sanity of eating ourselves to good health with (select) subway menu items? Err... Now we find we've been chowing down to chemicals used in Yoga Mats?? Huh?!


Subway, one of the world's biggest bread bakers, is about to remove a chemical from its breads that raised the ire of an influential health activist and food blogger.

The world's biggest sandwich chain says it's in the process of removing the chemical known as Azodiacarbonamide from its sandwich breads -- a chemical that Vani Hari, who runs the site FoodBabe.com, says is commonly used to increase elasticity in everything from yoga mats to shoe rubber to synthetic leather. It's used for the same reason in bread, she says, as a dough conditioner
Source

I'll take my Subways less rubbery if it means holding the chemicals, thank you. Tuna on White with black olive and pickle. That's my order and I'm sticking to it. I never asked for a side of 'Azodiacarbonamide' and I think I'm speaking for many when I say they can not only keep it ...but I'm not sure I trust them any longer.

It's been in there all THIS time...why care now? How much more is STILL there from chemical plants and pure man-made concoction?? NOW we're to believe it's actually clean and NOW they will go and sin no more? Ummm.... Not until they explain why it matters today but didn't matter yesterday for their removing this..?
edit on 6-2-2014 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:10 AM
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In here they dont add things to bread

Its like a stone in a day



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:12 AM
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I've never cared for Subway...they always forget to tessellate my cheese. You've gotta tessellate the cheese...

The interesting thing I took away from the news about this is that Subway hasn't said when it's going to stop using this chemical in their bread.

And no, in the truest sense of "baking" -- Subway does not "bake fresh bread". The dough comes halfway baked and frozen, then it is put into what's called a "proof box" to finish it off. You'll never see a Subway employee kneading dough or letting it rise.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Interesting. Didnt know they were selling this to the public

Azodicarbonamide

In the United States, azodicarbonamide has generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status and is allowed to be added to flour at levels up to 45 ppm.

In the UK, the Health and Safety Executive has identified azodicarbonamide as a respiratory sensitizer (a possible cause of asthma) and determined that products should be labeled with "May cause sensitisation by inhalation." The World Health Organization has linked azodicarbonamide to "respiratory issues, allergies and asthma." Britain, Europe, and Australia now ban its use in food



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Azodiacarbonamide, Azodiacarbonamide, Azodiacarbonamide... nope still can't pronounce it.

I think we should leave it in. As we get older we need our skin to be rubbery and stretchy or it just hangs off us and gets in the way.

OK, just kidding. Take it out, anything with a name like that must be dangerous.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:27 AM
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Bassago
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Azodiacarbonamide, Azodiacarbonamide, Azodiacarbonamide... nope still can't pronounce it.

I think we should leave it in. As we get older we need our skin to be rubbery and stretchy or it just hangs off us and gets in the way.

OK, just kidding. Take it out, anything with a name like that must be dangerous.


And all this time Bassago I thought the wrinkles were from my taking up lees space than when I was eating fresh ... and lots of it.
Now I can't afford to grind my own sausage, much less go buy an electric hero. Where will Roboclod go after this for his cottage wheeze?



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


I stopped going to subway after they changed the way they cut the bread.


When they went from the V down the middle to standard slice in half...

Im a creature of habit. *Cough ocd*


ETA:

I have an Irish immigrant friend, that all they used to complain about is the "chemicals" in american food, he would go on tirades while looking at ingredients.
edit on 6-2-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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Subway has always reeked of inferior ingredients, I have skipped the place for a long time. TOGO's ain't to bad and Quizno's is even better.

Been doing all I can to skip all corporate food. None of it is worth a crap.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Just as long as they taste the same I'm happy. Hate it when food makers change recipes Willy nilly, they already ruined Milky Way bars back in 1992....



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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if only the bread there tasted like bread the sandwiches would be so much tastier.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Yesterday, ATS went into meltdown because a CVS announcement to remove Tobacco (known to cause respiratory problems) from it's shelves was percieved as "Liberal Agenda".


Today Subway announces it's going to remove Azodiacarbonamide (known to cause respiratory problems) from it's bread and all the posts are "What a Great Idea!".

Just shows how perception of a story is influenced by the OP. Kudos for not spinning this story.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Yeah no doubt. I too miss the old way they cut the bread. Those sandwich artists used to take more pride in their work, sadly it's not the same anymore.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:23 PM
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The two may be completely unrelated and probably a coincidence, but I just ate Subway (footlong BMT on wheat) before reading this and I noticed that the bread was really, really flimsy and crumbly. The thing was literally falling apart in my hands. Perhaps the chemical may have already been removed, and in doing so, their bread really lacks the strength needed to pull off the rest of the sandwitch. Also, there was no 'chew' to the bread. It was like eating a solid, porous sawdust.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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It might be a good idea to look into flour bleaching agents, you may be cooking with it at home.

If the flour that you buy at the supermarket isn't yellowish in color, chances are it has been bleached. There are different kinds of bleaching agents, some worse than others.

One is a chemical that teenagers use to treat acne.
edit on bu282014-02-06T12:31:48-06:0012America/ChicagoThu, 06 Feb 2014 12:31:48 -060012u14 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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good find wrabbit. this could explain something that happened to me last year.
after eating my first subway meal, within an hour I was violently sick, and bed ridden for 2 days, environmental health checked their premises, but it was as clean as a whistle. I put it down to a flu bug.
3 months later, though id try another subway, from a different branch...this time I ended up in hospital for a week, had many tests, but nothing conclusive was found. needless to say, I haven't had one since!!



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 12:35 PM
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Wrabbit2000
Chemicals?? From Subway bread?? I thought Subway was the healthy alternative?? Wasn't Jared out there to convince us all of the safety and sanity of eating ourselves to good health with (select) subway menu items? Err... Now we find we've been chowing down to chemicals used in Yoga Mats?? Huh?!


Subway, one of the world's biggest bread bakers, is about to remove a chemical from its breads that raised the ire of an influential health activist and food blogger.

The world's biggest sandwich chain says it's in the process of removing the chemical known as Azodiacarbonamide from its sandwich breads -- a chemical that Vani Hari, who runs the site FoodBabe.com, says is commonly used to increase elasticity in everything from yoga mats to shoe rubber to synthetic leather. It's used for the same reason in bread, she says, as a dough conditioner
Source

I'll take my Subways less rubbery if it means holding the chemicals, thank you. Tuna on White with black olive and pickle. That's my order and I'm sticking to it. I never asked for a side of 'Azodiacarbonamide' and I think I'm speaking for many when I say they can not only keep it ...but I'm not sure I trust them any longer.

It's been in there all THIS time...why care now? How much more is STILL there from chemical plants and pure man-made concoction?? NOW we're to believe it's actually clean and NOW they will go and sin no more? Ummm.... Not until they explain why it matters today but didn't matter yesterday for their removing this..?
edit on 6-2-2014 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)


What is 'azodiacarbonamide' anyway? Is it those round black things next to the lettuce? I usually just ask for a 'bit of everything' on except those anyway.

This is all I could find on their not very helpful website regards what goes in their bread : "Continuously researching ways to further fortify our bread", I guess by that they mean this azodiacarbonide stuff, there website has no mention of ingredients anywhere..

subway.co.uk/aboutus/nutritional-leadership.aspx
edit on 0620142014Thu, 06 Feb 2014 12:36:30 -060012pm206ThursdayAmerica/Chicago by doorhandle because: added some magic



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:20 PM
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MystikMushroom
reply to post by benrl
 


Yeah no doubt. I too miss the old way they cut the bread. Those sandwich artists used to take more pride in their work, sadly it's not the same anymore.


Yea I remember when I first discovered subway, it was good quality back in the day, even measured it as a full ft long.

Now a ft lg 10in, and the breads got rubber in it.

And really, if they are so cheep they cheat you 2 in, is anyone surprised they would put chemicals to fluff it up so they could use less?

Thankfully that will no longer be the case.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:32 PM
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So how do we know if it is used in the unbleached, unbromated flour we buy at the store. Does it have to be listed on the flour bag or is the fact that it is gras and it is used in the process mean that it does not have to be listed? There is a long list of additives that do not have to be listed if they are used in a process to produce something.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by BritofTexas
 


There's a fly in your ointment....

If one CHOOSES to smoke and then develops respiratory problems it's their own fault. If however they're not smokers and want a simple sandwich they shouldn't have to worry about hidden ingredients that could possibly effect them adversely by causing respiratory problems.

CVS decided not to sell tobacco products which will cost them a considerable amount in lost revenues annually. Subway on the hand is simply removing an ingredient most people didn't know was there nor it's possible harmful effects.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 

Your linked source auto-runs a video that starts with a commercial and seems to lock my computer so I can’t pause it, close the video or close the web page until the commercial has run. Ctrl-alt-delete didn’t work either. I get a little funny when stuff like that happens. Maybe it's just my slow computer. So many adds, so little time.

Better to go to the source,

Launching Subway Petition – They Will Finally Hear From Us, Loud and Clear

FoodBabe.com ...and she is a babe!

edit on 2/6/2014 by Devino because: (no reason given)






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