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30,000+ Drones To Be Used In US Airspace By End Of Decade - FAA

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posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:23 AM
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The US Federal Aviation Administration has projected that upwards of 30,00 drones will be deployed in American airspace by the end of the decade, and law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation are already relying on unmanned aerial vehicles to track down dangerous criminals. Should Ventura decide to return, though, then he may want to consider crossing back into the US at Mexico's border with California: lawmakers there advanced a measure last week that would outlaw warrantless drone surveillance in most instances. The US Department of Homeland Security will likely nevertheless continue to use drones to patrol that very same international crossing, but a mishap off of California's Pacific Coast last last month lowered the number of DHS drones to only nine: a tenth UAV was crashed a few miles from San Diego after an onboard malfunction was detected, destroying the multi-million-dollar aircraft.


rt.com...

Not sure if this is the right place for this, but, this caught my eye. Didn't see it posted elsewhere. Why does the US need over 30,000 drones inside America? This is a hell of a wake up call...




posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:29 AM
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After 6 years 30,000?

So how many are up there now?



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:38 AM
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reply to post by Tancred
 


Remember, drones aren't just military and law enforcement hardware anymore.

The definition of drone is a remote controlled aircraft, this would include toys.

I think there are limits to size and type defined by the FAA, which has upset a few model aircraft enthusiasts who have model planes that are now considered drones and have to file flight plans just to fly them.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:43 AM
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Oook.

While I appreciate Ventura's independent opinions, and some great points over the years. His last TV show was all about speculation and showmanship, just like his wrestling career.

And it sounds like he's just begging for attention for his next one:


Speaking to CNBC on Tuesday from an “undisclosed location” south of the border, Ventura said there was a reason he doesn't reveal his each and every movement.

“I’m off the grid. I move about with my TV show so that the drones can’t find me and you won’t know exactly where I am,” Ventura said.

According to Ventura, his Ora TV program will continue to broadcast “as long as we have solar power and we can reach the satellite.”



Yeah Jesse, really hard to find you in corrupt Mexico, the only Gringo walking around with a TV crew, while the governments are making deals with cartels…


WASHINGTON — American law enforcement agencies have significantly built up networks of Mexican informants that have allowed them to secretly infiltrate some of that country’s most powerful and dangerous criminal organizations, according to security officials on both sides of the border.

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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TheLotLizard
After 6 years 30,000?

So how many are up there now?


300


The agency said it issued 313 certificates in 2011 and 295 of them were still active at the end of the year, but the FAA refuses to disclose which agencies have the certificates and what their purposes are.

Read more: www.washingtontimes.com...
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter


When's it all happening?


The FAA Reauthorization Act, which President Obama is expected to sign, also orders the Federal Aviation Administration to develop regulations for the testing and licensing of commercial drones by 2015.

Read more: www.washingtontimes.com...
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter


"Commercial drones", so… That means anyone willing to go through the hassle (or red tape) of setting up their own drones. Who wants them? Goodyear, instead of a blimp?

Weather reporting? Traffic reporting? News agencies? Police agencies? Fire fighting? Search and rescue?

"Commercial" kind of means anyone (corporation).


According to some estimates, the commercial drone market in the United States could be worth hundreds of millions of dollars once the FAA clears their use.
The agency projects that 30,000 drones could be in the nation’s skies by 2020.

Read more: www.washingtontimes.com...
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter


You have 6 years to build a blind.




posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


When I see the word ''deployed'' it strikes me as military deployment, especially when they say the FBI, etc, etc. The rest of us simply pilot, operate or fly drones. I think Uncle Sam is the only one that does any deployments. But I see your point, and I could be wrong, I hope I am wrong...



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:56 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 



Short deviation; I actually had a ''toy drone'' seized and confiscated in Jordan last month, I ordered a DJI Phantom to do photography in Wadi Rum, and it was seized by the Military Intelligence and I spent three days trying to get it back from the Intelligence Service. They literally sent armed guards with this DJI Phantom everywhere, and I met at least a dozen intelligence people working throughout Aqaba. Was pretty interesting, and a bit overkill.

However, I wouldnt consider a DJI Phantom a real drone. Its range is like 300m. The only way it would hurt someone is if it fell on them. But granted, 10m/sec is pretty fast if you did run it into someone...



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by Tancred
 

Without IFF (Identification, Friend or Foe), with the ability to go under the radar, without trustworthy identification marks visible to someone on the ground...... this does not bode well. Imagine a number of drones operated by terrorists mixing in with the new hordes of drones all over the skies..... this could easily become a nightmare for many reasons. Just some drone flying overhead..... monitoring you? Targeting you? I'm sure the paparazzi are happy with the potential to invade more privacy, as well as law enforcement or spy agencies.... didn't I see this in some sci fi movie?



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 06:22 AM
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Just wait til one of these crashes and kills someone on accident....



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 07:08 AM
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AlphaHawk
reply to post by Tancred
 




I think there are limits to size and type defined by the FAA, which has upset a few model aircraft enthusiasts who have model planes that are now considered drones and have to file flight plans just to fly them.





That is unqualifiably not true. Under the current regulations, which isn't even actually a regulation, but only an Advisory Circular, there are no restrictions other than keeping below 400 feet AGL and notifying any airport within 3 miles. The FAA is considering new regs but no NPRM has been issued.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by jaxnmarko
 


mashable.com...

Anyone else see this before? If one of these, but larger comes into play, then you have to worry that the link between a Predator and its operator is 100% secure. But, also, what happened in Iran, they claim to have lied to the drone to tell it to land with false GPS coordinates and it was captured so they claim and reverse engineered.

Only time will tell what happens next..



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