What happened to entry level jobs? Observations from a lazy, idiot bum.

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posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


When dad retired he was 55 and in good shape. He ran a small add in a green sheet (local paper for selling stuff) that basically said, "Handy man yard work brush cleared, trees trimmed, lawns mowed". He did not need a job but did not want to just sit around with nothing to do.. Within 2 years he had purchased a tractor with a brush hog and front end loader, pickup and trailer all paid for with cash. He did this type of work (he liked it!) for about 5 years and would have not quit except he got pissed at the IRS; nothing dramatic just got tired of paying them. He sold the business to one of his hired hands. After selling everything he has always said after working for Corporate America it was good to know he could make his way on his own.. He was single at the time for mom had passed away, so he was one busy beaver...

I have been thinking about telling you this since the other thread you posted a few days ago.. Location is obviously important and if there are 10,000 illegals in your area working for cash it will be difficult to get started..

Dad had such a reputation he was clearing lots for businesses and new building sights... I helped him a few times on some of the bigger jobs he had to do.... Glad he liked it and was happy to see him doing something he enjoyed..

After the sale of his handy man business he bought an aircraft (one of many) and continued to fly until he turned 74 and his eyes really started going bad.. Dad is 85 now and still in good shape... He fishes everyday weather permitting and says he is lucky and happy.. I would agree.
Look around and see if there is something in your area that needs doing an you could fill that need.. Working for yourself has many rewards... I wish you much luck




posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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You're a programmer.

Teach yourself the skills needed, then apply them freelance style.

I just started webdesign this week:

CodeAcademy

Actually looking to find a solid programmer to go over an idea. That's another route. Think something up, figure out a working model, then get it kickstarted.
edit on 5-2-2014 by webedoomed because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by CleanCare
 


Right but their hardwork and effort for their degree has done them nothing in the intelligence department obviously.

How can you argue that the degree has done anything for them? A degree doesnt mean anything obviously other then the fact that they can go to school.

From what ive seen going on in most major campuses its not hard work its partying and staying up all night the night before your test studying on adderal.

Maybe hard work is starting at the bottom on a job and taking time to study at home for technical knowledge and working extra hours off the book to get into a better position.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Be thankful you haven't chosen game development as a career. It's insanely difficult to crack that egg. AAA studios want a minimum of 5 years of experience, with at least one (usually two) AAA shipped games with your name already in the credits, and a 4 year degree minimum. Entry level positions are pretty much non-existent, and if they exist they are often given to QA testers who've been slaving away filing bugs for the last 10 years at minimum wage and polishing their skills on their own time in the hopes of moving up the corporate ladder. I'm at the point now where I have fully questioned my own sanity in trying to work in this field. While I have worked on a shipped AAA title, and an indie title and have 4.5 years of experience (as well as a college diploma in a related discipline), the bar seems to be set higher and higher every time I look for available jobs. Combine that with the cheap outsourcing in India that companies can utilize for assets and the future is looking grim.

That, and every snot nosed xbox kid and his dog wants to be a game developer now, so the market is flooded with competition.
edit on 5-2-2014 by DeadSeraph because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Well i am an electrician

And i hate the union

They are lazy

I now work at walmart

Tire nd lube( start tomorrow)

Not easy to get in to electric unless you know someone . When i started it was because of a man who had to have someone

Now i am waiting on approval by the Texas lisc dept to go back to work

But it c an take up to six weeks

If u can trucking is a good way to start a field

Stevens transport will train you

But you are right entry level jobs into a decent field are hard

Try plumbing you only have to know 3 thingz
Don't chew your nails
payday is Friday
Sh!t rolls downhill

Electric is a little harder and hurts more if you mess up

Hvac is for the short bus crowd

Good luck to you

This community has helped me get thru the hard times

And if you ever make it to Texas or Oklahoma i can help much more

Feel free to u2u if you have any questions



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by webedoomed
 


Funny you mention im taking the python classes and HTML/CSS classes right now.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:52 PM
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CleanCare

onequestion
reply to post by AprilFooseball
 


What long term impacts do you see coming from this?


The long term impacts will be that people will make more effort to increase their human capital (i.e. earn a degree) and get those entry level jobs that they seek.

Simply can't expect everything to come easy.


Big problem with that is that a degree doesn't count as experience and degrees are dime a dozen these days. Not only that but you can get a degree but if you mess up and put yourself in debt doing it and then don't immediately pick up something and pick up something worthwhile ... that debt drags you even further down.

Trust me. I've seen it in action.

No, the big problem right now is that it's a buyers' market. For every job that's out there, there are way too many qualified and overly qualified applicants. Employers can pick and choose and they don't have to offer much to entice anyone to apply or lure in the best. For every job, they'll be flooded with applicants and are bound to find more than enough to fit their ideal.

And the people at the very bottom are going to be the ones with the least experience.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by DeadSeraph
 


Damn man. This is the thing with programming careers is that coding is being taught in countries like India and China and their coders work for 9 an hour while the ones in the US want to start at least at 17.

I used to want to be a coder when i was younger but have gotten away from the field for a variaty of reasons.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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Are you willing to do hard manual labor and move to West Texas?

jobs.aol.com...

My uncle started off roughnecking in the oil fields many years ago. Right before he retired last year, he was making fairly high six-figures being a consultant on oil rigs.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by Another_Nut
 


Interesting Nut. Ive been told that theres always a need for these guys but i have no idea. So youve essentially stopped being an electrician?



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by kaylaluv
 


Yeah i am and i may end up doing that in texas or north dakota. Another member on ATS has done this recently and successfully, i wont mention who.

This is an open option for me currently and i may end up doing it when winter is over.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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If you have good credit, get a loan for $10,000 and bet it all on Roulette; Pick black or red odds are 50/50 chance



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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ANyone hiring in the metro detroit area hmu



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


We are always in need. I have 2 standing offers right now.

Just waiting on the tdlr



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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Whatever you do, try to maintain at least of record of being employed even if it means working at a place like Target or McDonald's because then that gives a leg up on those who are basically searching for work from home with no job to their name.

It may not be wonderful work or even work you're proud of, but it's more work then those folks are doing.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by bumjuicer101
 


The funny thing is im an EXCELLENT roullete player.

I do however have really bad credit. Made a few bad choices when i was younger and am paying for them now.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Another_Nut
 


So ive heard. This is why i am pursueing an apprenticeship. I would love to learn a trade and have a marketable skill like this.

I do know how to install flooring and work with wood. I can frame walls and hang drywall and do finish work.

Thats impossible to get into those fields due to illegals consuming whats left of that demolished market.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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I really do not understand your predicament.

I guess it would be because we live in different countries but lets be honest, getting a job isn't hard at all. Jump onto online job sites, hand out resumes, get off your arse and do something about it.
I've been made unemployed a few times due to cost cutting and the such. My last job I was made unemployed with was Telstra in in Australia and I was paid out close to 50K (made redundant) but since then I've been back and have actively participated in group sessions where people like you (who can't seem to find a job *for -whatever- reason*) attend and we work out what we can do for them.

I really have no sympathy for anyone who complains about not having a job. Every single time I have had an interview I have nailed it and have the job withing the week. In saying that, that has only happened a few times due to my previous statement about redundancy etc.

But, in saying that, Americ**t is the ass***e of the Earth, you need to get away from there asap.

After all, Australia is the lucky country! ^_^

Australia- why WE are the lucky ones!



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by samuel1990
 


You completely missed the point. Having any job is not the point. Noone asking for sympathy im talking about the diminshed market for entry level positions.

I already work a job on a farm doing maintenance part time while im looking for another opportunity.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by Another_Nut
 


Move to Australia. Electricians, plumbers and the like are paid close to $150 to $200 P/H (AUD) for house calls.


Again. Australia is awesome!





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