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Arthritis in young people

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posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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I decided to start this thread to see if I can get some clarity on an issue I have lived with since being a teen.

When I was young I began to experience pain in my right index finger which began to swell at the knuckle, this continued for years and became more swollen until a point where it stopped being painfull. It is still swollen and hard at the knuckle however is only painfull if I knock it on a hard surface or if it is exposed to the cold weather.
Later on before I turned 20 years old my middle finger on my left hand began to do the same... however on this finger only half of the knuckle swelled.
Then at 26 years old the small finger beside my pinky on my left hand began to do the same.. again only half of the knuckle swelled.
My hands look terrible, I have learned to live with this.
I occasionally get throbbing pains in my fingers (bearable).
Cold weather/water ect causes pain.
I am awaiting blood results and at the moment nd do not really understand what is wrong or what caused it in the first place,
have I caused this myself?
edit on 5-2-2014 by Kandinsky because: fixed typo in title




posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:18 PM
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Well im 33,

Since say 27 ive had problems in my hands and fingers that are Arthritis related.

Constant computer use, both recreational and work related.

Starting to have problems playing some of my console games, as an example Batman is awful on my hands, I just can't play that game with out hurting.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by michael1888
 

When your fingers do hurt you may want to try some heat therapy to help ease the pain. It sounds like you could be suffering from osteoarthritis.


Patients with osteoarthritis often develop lumps or nodules around the knuckles of the fingers. These lumps are called Heberden's nodes (when around the more distant knuckle) or Bouchard's nodes (when around the closer knuckle), and actually consist of bone spurs around the joints. These knuckles often become enlarged, swollen, and stiff. People often complain that their rings do not fit, or can't be removed.


Finger Arthritis



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Sorry to hear your gaming is affected.
I cant attribute my issue to computer use though as I was always a n outdoors type when younger and this began in my teens.
Have you been tested, how long did it take for results?



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by michael1888
 


pretty quick, I believe I got called back with in 2wks for a follow up apt for the results.

when it flares up I soak my hands in a hot herbal solution a friend helped me find... may not be TOS friendly as their are some oil extracts from a non-TOS friendly plant.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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Ive had a couple of back surgeries . !st one at 24 and secound at 42.
Beleive me authritis has been living rent free for a long time in me
Something on a positive note, just because you have flair ups and episodes doesnt necessarily mean the authritis is going to get progressively
worse. Obviousely that depends on the condition you have. I speak from personal expeirence and years of questioning the doctors and RNs.
Ive gone thru many years the authritis never showed its ugly self to me even know xrays showed It was there alive and real.
When it gets bad Itake some anti inflammatories , but thats just my preference. There's lots of foods to stay away from and good ones to eat but I havent folled that avenue yet.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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Within the four years I've known my now wife 33 she has been able to do a lot with her hands to barely being able to open containers, unless I open them for her and put them back on snug. she was 30 and diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, the bad part is the damage to her organs that are possible with the medicine shes on.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by overanocean
 


I havent tried any meds and instead just tried to ignore it over the years, I may try the anti inflamotaries for the swelling but wonder if I am too late as the damage is done?



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Ragnarokkr
 


I myself have trouble opening containers/bottles and stuff especially in the morning. Though I have adapted how I do things without realising.. ie open bottles using my middle finger for strength rather than my index finger and carry shopping in my "good hand".



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by michael1888
 


I developed psoriatic arthritis at like age 23 but looking back I had it at 19....it was eventually linked to my service in the military and I have become a disabled vet. Most of the research I have seen has linked some arthritis to vaccinations which in my case makes since because I took probably over 30 in all my deployments. I have not encountered many others my age with it. In fact when I got to see the specialists im the only young one in there...even though ive had it for over a decade im still the youngest one in the room every time.

Edit: I will say this...if I exercise and get moving around more....it feels tons better...same with the warmth as compared when its cold. I game alot and sit at the computer reading and I notice it if I dont get out and move around.
edit on 4-2-2014 by cosmicexplorer because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by michael1888
 


Hey Michael. I started having problems with arthritis when I was still a teen. By the time I was 19, I was getting cortisone injections in my fingers because they were getting locked (trigger finger). I ignored a whole lot of referrals until it hit my knees and locked them at age 24. THAT got this little chicken to finally go in and find out what was wrong. I'm guessing that you're probably being tested for Rheumatoid Arthritis, which can start while still a juvenile. Juvenile RA is rather uncommon but it happens. I'm 44 now and have had RA since I was 14 years old. I've been extremely lucky as it grew milder as I got older. My initial prognosis was to be in a wheelchair within 10 years and the diagnosis and prognosis really darkened my view for a good while. I didn't just get over that. I realized that that kind of thinking just made matters worse. When I turned 34, I climbed to the top of a massive butte in Arizona, turned to the direction where my old rheumatologist lived and gave her the bird from about 1000 miles away.
No kidding--really did that.
I should be doing it again this year when I'm all mended up from an injury.
And yep, cold weather/water sucks in a big way. We have a cold front right now and so my right wrist and ankle hurt like the devil.

If it turns out to be RA, then no, you didn't do this to yourself. While they aren't certain as to what causes RA 100%, what it looks like is that there is a genetic component and a trigger. In my case, I had Rubella (a suspected trigger for RA) as a child and come from a family with a history of autoimmune problems. What makes RA worse, though, is up to you. Overuse of any joint can exacerbate arthritic symptoms so learn to pace yourself in ALL of your activities. If it turns out to be RA, here's my words of advice and are what I've found that has helped me intensely. Mind you, the last time I was checked out, the doctor was in awe. I'm in THAT good of shape arthritis wise:

1. Warm water is your friend. Just like cold water is hell, warm water is heavenly and soothes the pain for a bit.
2. Avoid overusing any joint. Find your limits and remember one word: MODERATION.
3. Remember that there is more to life than just pain. Pain isn't your destiny if you start thinking that's the only thing guaranteed. Docs can sometimes be really grim jerks with the bedside manner of cryptkeepers. I think they intentionally scare patients to get them to take the meds.

4. If taking prednisone, always, always, always, always take calcium and add more dairy to your diet. Prednisone leeches calcium and you don't want to be brittle boned later.
5. Cortisone shots sound horrific but are the beneficence of God so if you get offered one, take it no matter how icky a needle going into a joint sounds.
6. When you start feeling resentful of your peers lack of discomfort, think about it this way. You're getting the slow and steady version of what's going to hit them like a freight train later. You're just becoming prematurely wise.

7. Do range of motion exercises and stretches. Use it or lose it.
8. Adapt and modify, which you're already doing.


Sure hope it's not JRA and just computer use and abuse but if it is JRA, let me be a light of hope for you. I'm 44 and was predicted as needing a wheelchair 20 years ago. I'm doing great. Barely any drift to my fingers even and I've not been on the disease modifying drugs for 13 years now.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


It would be nice if some people were mature enough to have a meaningful conversation about non-psychotropic therapy because it works much better then any lab made legal drug.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:01 PM
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thesaneone
reply to post by benrl
 


It would be nice if some people were mature enough to have a meaningful conversation about non-psychotropic therapy because it works much better then any lab made legal drug.


as some one whose Mother died at 49 due to liver failure, due not to Alcoholism, but a life time of using prescription pain meds like the Doctor prescribed I believe that 100%

Ats moratorium on the topic is shameful to me at best, and a malicious disservice at worst.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by thesaneone
 


Im sure you probably wouldnt even be posting on this sight if in fact you or someone close to you has had lifelong bouts of debilitating pain from
Authritis. That being said Irespect what you have to say obviousely steroids and non-steroid anti inflamatory drugs over time isnt that good for you.
I speak from expeirence about pain related to that. Look I know the drug companies are bastards and they focus on the green, but sometimes in short length of time doses you can stop that cycle of inflamation with drugs ,shots ,ect and BAM! you wipe out that cycle for a good long time. Then you start eating foods that help to curb that inflamation cycle.
Even asprin messes up your liver. I personally had to stop taking Vikoden ect because I am weak to addictive drugs and want not to be tempted.
But a little dose of Steroid and non-steroid can stop the cycle sometimes and put an end to the misery for quite awhile.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


And on a non-drug related pain therapy, I don't use pain killers of any sort other than the very occasional advil. I developed allergies to every kind of prescription pain killer on the market and the rest were eliminated because of their also being blood thinners (bleeding disorder so hence why the advil is very occasional). My options were either using something "else" or deal with it. I chose the latter. Never regretted it as I've got an intensely high pain threshold to show for it. Most of the time, I just tune out discomforts. For extreme pain, I'll actually do a self-hypnotic technique where I transport my mind to the offending joint and "erase" the pain. Works very well. It does have its drawbacks as one can find oneself being presumptuous about a pain only to discover that they have been sitting on a sharp object for 45 minutes. I also burned a 4 inch wide by 2 inch high section of the small of my back over the course of three days using a microwavable heating pad. I just figure the pain was the original offense and not anything new so just tuned it out until my fiance took a look. So, high pain threshold can be a bit of a sometimes laughable horror show but overall, I prefer my mind clear and my liver clean so it's worth it.

It's getting to that point that is hard. I remember in one of my worst RA flares while I was pregnant with my son, just laying in bed and trying very hard not to scream because it felt like I was being drawn and quartered. However, the pain threshold does rise.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by michael1888
 


Is not uncommon for people and young like you to start experiencing problems with arthritis, I am glad that you are getting blood test and will have your results soon so the doctor can pin point your exact problems and tailor a proper treatment for you condition is good to start soon so it doesn't keep progressing too fast.

I am older so I am starting to feel the effects of mild arthritis myself in my shoulder after having shoulder surgery over ten years ago.

I am sure you will be able to live a productive life once start a treatment, with hopefully minor side effects of the condition.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by overanocean
 


I do agree with what you said and the key word in your reply is short term because they are very powerful drugs with some very nasty side effects.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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thesaneone
reply to post by overanocean
 


I do agree with what you said and the key word in your reply is short term because they are very powerful drugs with some very nasty side effects.


Yep. Not good for long term use at all. Known a couple people who spent years on prednisone and got brittle bones. My best friend's mother is one of them and she shattered her hip just bending over. Seems to me like most of the drugs were nasty in one way or the other though. I was on methotrexate, plaquenil (lupus overlap), prednisone and salsalate as my mainstays for a bit. Lost some of my hearing in my right ear from the NSAIDs within a matter of years and because of that, even though i've not been on any of those for over a decade now, I still worry about the damage they may have done to my organs.



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 10:08 PM
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___________________________

I had major inflammation in my joints till my late twenties,
mainly effecting my fingers, knees, and neck.
After years of trial and error came a halleluiah moment
when all the inflammation and stiffness disappeared ! !
Turns out that preservatives, such as Nitrites (preserves meat
as cold cuts/hot dogs etc.) and Sulfites (used
to extend the shelf life of products such as condiments.)
were causing the joint inflammation !
Sulfites are also known to destroy vitamin B1 (thiamin),
a vitamin essential for metabolism of carbohydrates too.
I noticed the difference within days after dropping preserved
foods from my diet.
. . . give it a try !

Any who, a little trick I use to open new jars :
Just insert a small spoon under the lip of the lid
and gently pry till you hear it pop . . . opens
easily


Here are some other ingredients that can cause inflammation :
AVOID these additives

____________________________



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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michael1888
I am awaiting blood results and at the moment nd do not really understand what is wrong or what caused it in the first place,
have I caused this myself?

Probably not, but hopefully you did not wait years before you went to the doctor.

Aside from prescription medication, there are anti-inflammatory diets and supplements you could consider. But as with prescription medications, the average person would be wise to consider these only under professional advice. For example, here is the PubMed Id for a review titled, "Natural products as a gold mine for arthritis treatment": 17475558. It gives examples of various supplements with substantial anti-inflammatory properties. Link to Abstract

There are times when exposures to certain foods can cause noticeable skin and other types of inflammation in the body. For example, wheat allergy is sometimes associated with arthritis. But most of the time, a particular food or environmental trigger is either not the cause or is not identified, and the likely predisposing factors are thought to be genetic or autoimmune in nature for younger persons.






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