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Met Office: SIGNIFICANT WEATHER EVENT will hit UK in days as HUGE Atlantic storm ROARS in

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posted on Feb, 10 2014 @ 06:03 PM
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Maya00a
Does anyone know why this can't be replicated elsewhere to help prevent future flooding?


Money - or to be exact, the limited supply of it.

The Treasury sets rules on where gets flood defences, based on economic impact, the amount of people/businesses in an area etc.

Also, as in the Netherlands, the land that was reclaimed was done so over centuries - it's not something that can be easily replicated everywhere and even if it could, the costs would be extreme.

It also awaits to be seen whether this Winter is the new standard, or whether it is a one off not to be repeated for another century. This also has a bearing on decisions made and if it is actually worthwhile to spend billions when it might not ever be used.




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:19 AM
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Looks like such weather is set for being more frequent.

www.bbc.co.uk...


More than 5,000 properties have been flooded in the last two months after the "most exceptional period of rainfall" to hit parts of England and Wales for nearly 250 years and more than 130 severe flood warnings - indicating a threat to life - have been issued since December.


thinkprogress.org...


Speaking ahead of the release of a government report on Britain’s unusually stormy winter weather, the Met Office’s chief scientist, Dame Julia Slingo said on Sunday that the U.K. had seen the “most exceptional period of rainfall in 248 years” and called the extreme weather “consistent with climate change.

“All the evidence suggests there is a link to climate change,” she said. “There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events.”

The report, jointly produced by the U.K. Meteorological Office (Met Office) and the U.K. Center of Ecology and Hydrology, concluded that both Britain’s epically wet and windy winter and the unusually cold air over much of North America were linked to a persistent pattern of perturbations to the jet stream, over the Pacific Ocean and North America. The Pacific jet stream was deflected far to the north, bringing colder air south over Canada and the northern U.S. When this cold air entered the North Atlantic jet stream, the jet stream became stronger — about 30 percent stronger than is usual for December and January. The powerful jet stream set up conditions for active storm formation over the Atlantic and gave rise to a sequence of strong storms that battered the U.K.

The changes in the Pacific jet stream, which set all of this in motion, were driven by a heavy rainfall over Indonesia and the tropical West Pacific that has its roots in higher than normal ocean temperatures in the region.

The report also documented evidence for increased North Atlantic storm intensity and increased rainfall intensity in the U.K. While the number of strong winter cyclones in the North Atlantic has not increased since 1871, the report cited research showing an increase in their mean intensity.

The report said there was “emerging evidence” that daily heavy rain events in the U.K. may be more frequent. Downpours which fifty years ago occurred just 1 in 125 days are now more likely to occur 1 in 85 days.

Since December, the Environment Agency has issued more than 130 severe flood warnings. In all of 2012, there were just
nine such warnings.

“We have records going back to 1766 and we have nothing like this,” Dame Julie said. “We have seen some exceptional weather. We can’t say it is unprecedented but it is exceptional.”




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:29 AM
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Just been thinking that life could be a lot worse - I've just seen a thoroughly drenched postman stagger down the road. Glad I haven't got his job.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:37 AM
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stumason
This also has a bearing on decisions made and if it is actually worthwhile to spend billions when it might not ever be used.


A bit like the £Billions for updating nuclear weapons then!


Sorry, couldn't resist that analogy! I know they always bring up the cost of such defence / mitigation projects, but to be realistic, it would be cheaper than the cost of many of their combined IT project failures over the last decade or two, and a hell of a lot more useful. Given government waste and bailouts of banks, this would be a drop in the ocean (forgive the watery pun).



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:40 AM
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It always amazes me that we English folk think our weather as extreme.

I think more of us need to leave the confines of our island and travel.... then and only then will the perspective be in focus.

Peace,

Korg.


edit on 11-2-2014 by Korg Trinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 05:56 AM
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Korg Trinity
It always amazes me that we English folk think our weather as extreme.

I think more of us need to leave the confines of our island and travel.... then and only then will the perspective be in focus.

Peace,

Korg.

I don't know anyone who thinks standard UK weather is extreme. That's not to say we can deny the increase in severe and unpredictable weather events in recent years. Tell all those who have just been flooded out of their homes to have some 'perspective' and see where it gets you! These ARE extreme - relatively speaking. But it's OK, if your house has just disappeared down a cliff, you should dance and put on your happy face because hey at least you aren't in the Philippines/wherever...
edit on 11-2-2014 by starchild10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:06 AM
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starchild10

Korg Trinity
It always amazes me that we English folk think our weather as extreme.

I think more of us need to leave the confines of our island and travel.... then and only then will the perspective be in focus.

Peace,

Korg.

Tell all those who have just been flooded out of their homes to have some 'perspective' and see where it gets you!


Did these people contact the ordinance survey before they bought their properties to find out if they were buying a house in a flood plain?

If not then more fool them.

If they did and still decided to buy then they only have themselves to blame.

I'm tired of all the extreme weather sensationalizing that seems to be going on... I say Man up and deal with what the day may bring... we don't have to deal with the kinds of threats nature has in store for much of the world... we are the lucky ones!

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:26 AM
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Korg Trinity


Did these people contact the ordinance survey before they bought their properties to find out if they were buying a house in a flood plain?

If not then more fool them.

If I were relocating now the primary considerations would be land stability and history of flooding - flood plain or not. Hindsight is a wonderful thing! The fact is plenty of people are going to suffer whether or not on a flood plane. Also many areas were managed perfectly well till a certain EU directive. Add to that sloppy management/money saving and record breaking weather and it's a recipe for disaster. It's too easy, too simplistic and frankly unhelpful to point the finger at those affected and say 'tough your fault'. The first thing we need to do is help these people, then take a look at all the contributing factors, future planning and disaster management. Who knows maybe we will have to give some areas back to the sea, maybe we can learn a thing or two from the Dutch....
edit on 11-2-2014 by starchild10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:31 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


About 8200 years ago the Atlantic Conveyor system (ocean currents) changed in the space of ONE YEAR and stayed like that for over 1100 years…… due to an influx of meltwater into the ocean.

Maybe with an increased melting of the polar region PLUS the after effects of the Deep Water Horizon disaster 'diluting' the oceans then maybe, just maybe we are seeing a change in this region before our very eyes…..

I have a distinct feeling that this might be the new 'Norm'….. suck it up….

PDUK



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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PurpleDog UK

I have a distinct feeling that this might be the new 'Norm'….. suck it up….

Could well be - for whatever reason. Or maybe there won't actually be a 'norm'. I'm wondering where to move to!



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 07:14 AM
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reply to post by PurpleDog UK
 


It is feasible that major climate alterations to the currently preceived 'norm' are on the way.

Whilst the UK is being drenched and experiencing record rainfall with the pattern set to continue, California is in drought with the pattern set to continue.

Unless something major happens that sways things into favourable conditions, it looks like there is some serious rethinking about habitations, the ecosystem, agriculture, economics and environmental management on local and international levels required immediately, as the current way is clearly affecting too many and having too many repercussions.

thinkprogress.org...


If what the tree rings say is true, California hasn’t been this dry in more than 500 years. If what the leading climate scientists say is true, that dryness will only get worse in the coming years. And if what economics predict is true, grocery bills nationwide may be some of the first things to suffer.
When conditions are ripe, California’s $44.7 billion agricultural industry is “the supermarket of the world,” producing nearly half of all the fruits, nuts and vegetables grown in America. The most abundant source of produce comes from Central Valley — deemed “The Land of A Billion Vegetables” by the New York Times — which produces 8 percent of America’s agricultural output by value.
But now, Central Valley is the biggest victim of the state’s three-year drought. And there are no sign that things will get any better in the coming years.

edit on 11-2-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:06 AM
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starchild10
If I were relocating now the primary considerations would be land stability and history of flooding - flood plain or not. Hindsight is a wonderful thing! The fact is plenty of people are going to suffer whether or not on a flood plane. Also many areas were managed perfectly well till a certain EU directive. Add to that sloppy management/money saving and record breaking weather and it's a recipe for disaster. It's too easy, too simplistic and frankly unhelpful to point the finger at those affected and say 'tough your fault'. The first thing we need to do is help these people, then take a look at all the contributing factors, future planning and disaster management. Who knows maybe we will have to give some areas back to the sea, maybe we can learn a thing or two from the Dutch....
edit on 11-2-2014 by starchild10 because: (no reason given)


My main point is we just have to deal with what comes....

If you haven't had the foresight or unheeded the obvious warning signs then i'm sorry but I have no sympathy.

Look at this picture....



What could possibly go wrong? What were these people thinking when they laid the foundations??

If you chose to live near a river and didn't consider the possibility of it bursting it's banks.... More Fool You!

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


I used to live next to a river that would flood rarely, never did any real damage but it is a relief to get away, these last few weeks have been really dodgy in that area. Police were asking people to evacuate, that's never happened before.

I live on top of a mountain now though. Only problem now is I'm worried about landsliding down onto the neighbours lol.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:46 AM
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Tsu322
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


I used to live next to a river that would flood rarely, never did any real damage but it is a relief to get away, these last few weeks have been really dodgy in that area. Police were asking people to evacuate, that's never happened before.

I live on top of a mountain now though. Only problem now is I'm worried about landsliding down onto the neighbours lol.


Quite... thank you for highlighting my point.



There is always risks contained in everything. I just can't understand those that when the risk becomes a reality they cry as if it is some kind of surprise that they have fallen foul of fate.

Yes it's awefull to see people suffer... but it's hardly surprising.... how many years of climate change information has there been? It's as if these people purposefully ignored all the warning signs.

I love Florida... I would love to live in Miami... but would I complain when the typhoon hits?? Nope I would expect it and take the necessary precautions to make sure my family were safe.

Incidentally... according to the map I saw on here yesterday Florida will be underwater in the next 100 years... so go catch some rays now while you can lol


Peace,

Korg.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


I know what you mean.

What gets me is when you see people living next to active volcanoes. I don't understand how they sleep at night. If it were me I would move away as soon as I could.

I really do feel lucky to be British at times, even if we are expecting more rain. I'll take constant storms over pyroclastic blasts any day!




posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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Ooopsie.
edit on 1122014 by Tsu322 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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Tsu322
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


I know what you mean.

What gets me is when you see people living next to active volcanoes. I don't understand how they sleep at night. If it were me I would move away as soon as I could.

I really do feel lucky to be British at times, even if we are expecting more rain. I'll take constant storms over pyroclastic blasts any day!



Oh you'd be amazed how many idiots live on the slopes of Mount Vesuvius. The first time I went to Naples I took one look at the number of new builds on its lower slopes and gaped. Apparently a lot of them have no official planning permission or exist due to bribery.



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


This looks really bad now... waist deep in some areas! Glad I live where I do and not along the Thames in Kent or Somerset! They say on skynews that the flooded areas could stay flooded until May! But dont we get more rain in June.... this could last the whole year! Should be glad that its mild and not snowing and freezing cold!



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by Britguy
 


True, can't really argue with that


In an ideal world, we'd have decent flood defences and big shiny rockets too



posted on Feb, 11 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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stumason
reply to post by Britguy
 


True, can't really argue with that


In an ideal world, we'd have decent flood defences and big shiny rockets too


Hmmmm Shiny Rockets......


We could have some ninjas too... maybe Ninjas with lazer eyes... then we could use all of that to distract those away from the fact that the local polititions have spent all the flood defence money on mini round abouts!


Peace,

Korg.



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