It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

India to explore the moon in 3 years!

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 02:22 AM
link   
And who says India is not moving up in the world? There is a sudden frenzy of tech developments in India.

www.spacetoday.org...

It seems major US/European companies want a slice of the pie too.

US, UK vie for slice of India moon mission

WOW.


[edit on 22-11-2004 by aryaputhra]




posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 03:26 AM
link   
The aliens would kick their (_!_) off the moon anyways....


[edit on 22-11-2004 by giorgio]



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 05:08 PM
link   
Maybe they can get us some nice high res shots of the lunar buggy or previous landing sites to prove that us Yanks actually went there....

Then again, we probably paid them off to alter their images as well. Not



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 09:48 PM
link   
jealousy makes you ppl nasty huh



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 11:41 PM
link   
I'm surprised. Thought India would stay in the state of retrogression.



posted on Nov, 22 2004 @ 11:52 PM
link   
Don't be surprised if their moon base looks just like a 7-11.

J/k



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 12:03 AM
link   
That's a sad and unblithe joke. You should slap yourself.


[edit on 23-11-2004 by BurningAces]



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 12:06 AM
link   
Back on topic guys. If you don't have anything useful to contribute to the discussion then don't post.


As far as the planned Indian lunar missions, good news! The more nations planning and attempting space missions the better, hopefully it can spur some competition and drive a new space race.



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 12:12 AM
link   
This doesn't suprise me at all. It's good timing as far as I'm concerend.

It's AMAZING how many of Indias highly skilled people are leaving the country to work overseas. The company I work for employs quite a few Mechanical Engineers, Geophysicists and Electrical Engineers from India. I know its because of the money.

But, now with this, hopefully India will see a boom in tech industries, pay all these skilled individuals accordingly, and let them work in the place they grew up.

In Canada, so many people move to the west from the maritimes (east coast) due to there being basically zero industry there. Same type of people coming from India and other countries. They are all homesick, and would rather make a good living back home.

I'm very lucky to live where I do, and meet all these people. But if I were in their position, I'd rather do what I love and be near the people I love as well. Being 3000 miles from everything you know would suck.



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 12:13 AM
link   
I think the competition ("space race") will eventually turn into "Space Wars". Though it's commendable that's India doing something after all these years that Russia first launched Sputnik.



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 12:45 AM
link   
It's not for the lack of the technological know-how, in fact India did conduct it's first even space mission back in the Eighties! - with cosmonaut, Rakesh Sharma. The manned space program of the Indian Space Research Organisation the first Indian cosmonaut became the 138th man into space, he spent eight days in space.

I think back then, the decision not to persue into space missions was a political decision considering India limited spending resources and other pressing needs.

However you will be suprised to know, India has from humble beginnings successfully conducted and managed to develop its space program.

The following are some of its noted achievements:

LAUNCH VEHICLES

India has sucessfully managed to develop

SLV - Satellite Launch Vehicle
ASLV - Augmented Satellite Launch Vehicle
PSLV - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle
GSLV - Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle

The launcher program has seen a gradual evolution (from the all-solid SLV-3 to solid, liquid and cryogenic fuelled stages currently used in PSLV series (Delta class launcher) and GSLV (Ariane-class).

India is also developing following space launch vehicles:

GSLV Mk-I
GSLV Mk-II
GSLV Mk-III

SATELLITES:

They have successfully deployed the following satellites, now being used by India, US and other european countries.

Apple
Aryabhata
Bhaskara
INSAT-1 series
INSAT-2 series
IRS-Series
Rohini
Sross

The IRS series is the most impressive.

The IRS base in Shadnagar covers all of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burma and Thailand, and portions of Iran, Oman, Cambodia and Laos. Norman acquires data of nearly all of North America, including from southern Canada, Mexico and most of Central America.

Neustrelitz, Germany covers Europe, and portions of western Asia and northern Africa. Space Imaging EOSAT has complete coverage several times over of IRS-1B data for the Norman footprint and is beginning to build the IRS-1C archive.

IRS-1C has on-board recorders for data collection outside the range of ground station, to further increase data availability. Space Imaging EOSAT is rapidly expanding the IRS ground station network. Germany is now receiving IRS-1C data and is processing this data since mid-1996.

Ground stations in Australia, Japan, Thailand, South Africa and Ecuador are be receiving and recording data since the end of 1996, and as many as 10 others are on-line in 1997. Another means to expand the global archive of available data is Space Imaging EOSAT's capability to deploy portable ground stations worldwide to collect IRS (as well as Landsat, ERS, and SPOT) data.

LAUNCHPADS

Shri HariKota Space Centre
Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre

It's three launch pads have facilities or a variety of sounding rockets, including French Centaure Dragon, the Indian Centaure and Rohini, Britain's Skua and Petrel, America's Nike-Apache, Nike-Tomahawk and Arcas and Russia's M-100. From the year that TERLS became operational, the successful launch of a NASA Nike-Apache, Nike-Tomahawk and Arcas, different types have been launched for geophysical and astronomical studies.

SO MUCH FOR LOOKING LIKE A 7/11, huh?





[edit on 23-11-2004 by aryaputhra]



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 01:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by aryaputhra


SO MUCH FOR LOOKING LIKE A 7/11, huh?



[edit on 23-11-2004 by aryaputhra]


Eh, come on I was j/k - just kidding. Here in the states most people see Indians taking over convenience store chains. In my sector of work I see a lot of Indian technologists. Besides that, they have great area for launch, with lot of coastline and the equator.

And yeah, it'd be cool if world competed in peaceful space exploration rather than warfare. That day is probably coming. (let's hope)



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 01:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by Torus
This doesn't suprise me at all. It's good timing as far as I'm concerend.

It's AMAZING how many of Indias highly skilled people are leaving the country to work overseas. The company I work for employs quite a few Mechanical Engineers, Geophysicists and Electrical Engineers from India. I know its because of the money.

But, now with this, hopefully India will see a boom in tech industries, pay all these skilled individuals accordingly, and let them work in the place they grew up.

In Canada, so many people move to the west from the maritimes (east coast) due to there being basically zero industry there. Same type of people coming from India and other countries. They are all homesick, and would rather make a good living back home.

I'm very lucky to live where I do, and meet all these people. But if I were in their position, I'd rather do what I love and be near the people I love as well. Being 3000 miles from everything you know would suck.


Yes, there is also an internet urban legend passing around about the high percentage of Indians employed high tech corps such as Microsoft and Nasa. The numbers are not however true but it is in fact true that there is a high number. I too wish they do some good for their homeland as they do for their adopted countries.

economictimes.indiatimes.com...

Taibunsuu, yes I am very well aware of their 7/11 and motels they own as are the myth of the chinese owning lots of convenience stores or koreans owning liquor joints in black neighbourhoods. Smacks of xenophobia, doesn't it?


[edit on 23-11-2004 by aryaputhra]



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 01:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by aryaputhra

Taibunsuu, yes I am very well aware of their 7/11 and motels they own as are the myth of the chinese owning lots of convenience stores or koreans owning liquor joints in black neighbourhoods. Smacks of xenophobia, doesn't it?

[edit on 23-11-2004 by aryaputhra]


Yeah, but it's not a myth. Indian families in Wilkes-Barre own three convenience stores, and both Dunkin Donuts. India, China, and Korea have huge merchant class. So merchant immigrants just set up shop here often.



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 01:58 AM
link   
Bout time some one eles is trying to get to the moon even if its just a probe. I wish India the best of luck


I also heard China planned to put a man on the moon by 2010 or 2015 something like that timescale.

I mean we have private companies (Scaled Composite) making it into orbit now there should be alot more countries getting into space now.


E_T

posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 02:21 AM
link   
Look what Google found...
Article dated for November 2003.
India's Space Program Turns 40



FAS - Indian Space Activities





SLV
ASLV
PSLV
GSLV
www.bharat-rakshak.com...


Here's official site of Indian Space Research Organisation:
www.isro.org...



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 02:46 AM
link   
How about feeding the people there first instead of doing something the US did decades ago.

If the country is like the UK, Finland, Japan, Germany, then it's ok. They have the financial might to do it anyway without compromising the basic needs of the people.

But India. I believe it's better for them not to follow in the footsteps of China. Sure, China has military strength but they have a lot of poor people there that would need the employment to accomodate their most basic of needs.

[edit on 23-11-2004 by Unnamed_One]



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 04:50 AM
link   


How about feeding the people there first instead of doing something the US did decades ago.


Thank you for stating this, scrolling down the replies I was suprised to see only one person make such a remark.

I abhor to this "man on the man" fiasco, it's nothing but an idiotic endevour by Indians. Being an Indian, and having been in India plenty, I know what it's like to live there; people need food, shelter, and clothes, on top of that, health, education and a viable means to support themselves economicly.

This space mission will only bring gluttony points..

Deep



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 06:36 AM
link   
ZeroDeep, I disagree wholeheartedly. IMO any endevor that has the effect of expanding human knowledge and expanding our ancestral territory out into the solar system has my support. This move is quite necessary because the only way countries like India and China will be able to feed all there people in the future is to get more resources and earth is getting tapped out fast. I read a report the other month that pretty much put it like this. "In order to bring the rest of the world up to the western standard of living we are gonna need at least 3 more planets worth of resources"

So you wanna get rid of human hunger, that a good goal but the only way to do this is to look foward to the future and not get caught up in the present or past. By 2050 the UN expect there to be at least 8.7 billion people on the planet earth. If we stay here we are toast, plain and simple. The major reason countries are taking a renewed interest in the moon, is because technology is almost at the point where we can start mining it and setting up permanent settlements that would be far more comfortable then orbital habitats. The final reason why I think every country that has the means today should be aiming for the moon is summed it with this: Helium-3



posted on Nov, 23 2004 @ 08:06 PM
link   
For those who object India's relevance of having a space program, I quote Dr. Vikram Sarabhai's (Father of Indian Space Research) remarks:


"There are some who question the relevance of space activities in a developing nation. To us, there is no ambiguity of purpose. We do not have the fantasy of competing with the economically advanced nations in the exploration of the moon or the planets or manned space-flight."

"But we are convinced that if we are to play a meaningful role nationally, and in the community of nations, we must be second to none in the application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society."

- Dr. Vikram A. Sarabhai, Father of India's Space Program



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join