Roundup 'Weed Killer' Threatens Coral Reefs, Persists In Seawater

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posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:01 AM
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Several years ago I saw an experiment conducted in a salt water aquarium that had living coral. If I remember correct two drops of sun tan lotion was added to the 30 gallon tank and all coral died a short time later.. Never have forgotten that experiment..

Now from Australia another tid bit of possible coral destruction.. It has been known for a very long time that fertilizer run off was harming coral reefs however this is the first study where the 30,000,000 lbs of Roundup used annually in Australia is being indicated as a culprit too.

www.activistpost.com...


A highly concerning new study published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin indicates that the world's most popular herbicide glyphosate (aka Roundup), used primarily in GM agriculture, is particularly resistant to biodegradation in coral reef collected sea water, and could therefore be a major contributor to the decline of marine coral reef systems such as the Great Barrier Reef.

When compared to previously reported half-life estimates for glyphosate biodegradation in soil and fresh waters, the sea water estimates are dramatically higher. Previous soil and water data described glyphosate's biodegration half-life to be as rapid as 5 days for field soil and 49 days for bog and natural water.* If the new sea water flask experiments accurately reflect real world conditions, glyphosate's maximal 315 day half life in sea water would add up to 63-fold increased persistence to the chemical's toxicological profile. The researchers also pointed out that flooding events which would bring glyphosate to sea would involve co-occurrence of massive quantities of sediment to which glyphosate readily binds, which would further prevent glyphosate's biodegradation, potentially greatly enhancing its persistence and toxic effects.





posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:26 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 

Though I'd love to point a finger at Monsanto, or go on for days about how farming could be done on the cheap without so much fertilizer ... this boils down to poor personal management, and one of the few instances where I would agree that government needs to step in and say, "Stop it." The problem is big money, and nobody's gonna say those words in a timely fashion where the almighty dollar is concerned.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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Perhaps we will reach a point where we can all just agree that the wholesale dumping of extremely dangerous chemicals into the open environment (as the whole point, believe it or not! Yikes!) is a really really bad idea.

Maybe Roundup isn't dangerous to humans (and I'm nowhere near convinced of that) but it's sure insanely dangerous to some forms of life...hence it's whole purpose to exist. This? We spray, dump and pour all over to just assume it's absorbed or goes away.

Err... surprise, I guess.. I doesn't just 'go away', huh?



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 

We are pretty shoddy stewards of the planet.

When it comes to water, I read a study a few years back regarding prescription meds that can't be filtered out in the reclamation process. It caught my eye, because it the meds were some I am prescribed and fairly common.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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It just boggles my mind that people don't understand how it works. Like my neighbor. He is obsessed with a "weed free" yard.
One time he sprayed beside our garage, thinking he was "helping".
Needless to say, I spent some time educating him about the fact that we both have wells, and this stuff is soaking in the ground. Where did he think it was going to go?
He still uses it on his. Moron.

So, if on a grander scale, they are using this on fields, there is going to be runoff. Into the waterways. Where do people think this is going to end up.

It's common sense people. Sure wish more people had it.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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reply to post by Snarl
 


Agreed on the prescription stuff. I'd read something similar years ago in USA Today by a High School student that went out collecting water samples. Anyone can do that and send the water to commercial labs for a chemical/substance report, which is what she'd done as I recall.

What I'm certain of my memory for was the trace evidence of a whole pharmacy worth of drugs in all the open, "wild" water sources looked at (Creeks, ponds, lakes...).

People think when we flush or when something gets sprayed on the ground ..it just goes away. Errr.... We're living in one heck of a mess around us, due to that thinking IMO.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


Round Up,

Toxic to the land and people, this study shows its even worse in the Oceans.


glyphosate's maximal 315 day half life in sea water would add up to 63-fold increased persistence to the chemical's toxicological profile. The researchers also pointed out that flooding events which would bring glyphosate to sea would involve co-occurrence of massive quantities of sediment to which glyphosate readily binds, which would further prevent glyphosate's biodegradation, potentially greatly enhancing its persistence and toxic effects.



glyphosate's persistence in the soil, groundwater, and even air,
is a far greater problem than officially acknowledged.


And to think that the large chemical companies just got the greenlight
to use 2 4-d on crops!




posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by chiefsmom
 


Uhh how much was he using?

Unless he was drenching with hundreds of litres, it's never going to reach your well..unless your well is a puddle.

But you are correct when talking on a grander scale and as Snarl said, the biggest issue with all this is management.





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