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Deciphering the Pagan Stones

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posted on May, 9 2014 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: Logarock

There's long been a link between Scotland and France, such as the Auld Alliance



The alliance dates from the treaty signed by John Balliol and Philip IV of France in 1295 against Edward I of England. The terms of the treaty stipulated that if either country was attacked by England, the other country would invade English territory, as became evident at the Battle of Flodden Field, 1513.


As far as the Templars, it goes back much further:



The Knights Templar were formed in 1118 by Hugh de Payens in order to protect the road to Jerusalem from the Muslims and Jews. They were a combination of monk and soldier, similar to the Knights Hospitaller formed earlier to treat the sick from the crusades. Both orders spread quickly throughout Europe and it is probably in the reign of David I that both were endowed lands in Scotland. The Knights Templar were granted lands near Drumchapel:- Temple (hence the name, at Anniesland), Jordanhill (named after the middle-eastern land by the Templars) and the surrounding woodland that became known as Knightswood; parts of Knightswood are named North and South Templar. Both Sides of the burn states: 'Most of Knightswood estate was a detached portion of Jordanhill estate though much had an ancient and honourable history of its own. The name commemorates the Knights Templar who had been granted these lands and the wood for their services in the crusades.'


Knights Templar in Scotland

(Drumchapel etc are in Glasgow, just to the west).

This group are looking at the connections between France, the Templars, the Masons and of course, our beloved Rosslyn:

Rosslyn Templars


Can confirm some of.

The Templars / Drumchapel / Knightswood story was told to me (and my class) by the only good teacher we ever had (who came from Jordanhill teachers college, just by Knightswood) and told us some of our only proper off-curricular history God bless him. Going back to about 1990 there. Anyway he told us about that whole situation and it seems pretty plausible I guess, I lived in Knightswood and Anniesland myself so I know the area and actually as a point of interest, all the streets around that area are named after Army kinda Castley things: For example there is Knightswood, Archerhill, Turret Crescent, Tabard Road, Pikeman Road, Alderman Road, Kingsway, Thane Road, etc.




posted on May, 9 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe

Re: Rosslyn

You perhaps have seen this by now, and Logarock too, but it's a BBC Docu on Rosslyn which gives us a comparison between Rosslyn and French builds of the same time, I found it really interesting. Documentary is presented by Helen Rosslyn who is actually married into the Rosslyn family, just happens to be a documentary maker herself.

This is part 1/4 but the other three should be easy to find there too if you want them.





posted on May, 9 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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originally posted by: Logarock
Z rod alert! Z rod alert!




Found this while looking deep into the feminine lunar. Its Akkadian.

4th section over, moon slice, snake and Z.

Jee Zee Akkad


Z rod alert responding!

That is excellent, Z rod, crescent, snake, sun/disc/cross all in one go. They've got the same Hathor/ram hair too. There's too many symbols grouped together here to ignore, these surely mean something together.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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This is a celtic coin from the...oh wait, it's not it's a cylinder seal "Cylinder Seal "Archer attacking a Lion Griffin, Tree with winged sun disk above" Mesopotamia Neo Assyrian (ca. 1049-609 b. c.); chalcedony Morgan Library, NYC:




Note the joints (circles)



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: Ramcheck

Nice one, thanks, that looks good.
As far as Knightswood et al, it's fact I would say. Did you know there are still standing stones besides Goals football pitches in Drumchapel? It seems unlikely too, but it was apparently a Druid powerhouse in it's day.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe

Yep there are I'm quite sure many 'quiet' digs in the suburbs of St Mungo's Parish. I've been keeping an eye on one on the south side which started about 30 years ago? Between Carmunnock and Busby / Clarkston (near Eaglesham) Very much in farm land (lots of arable grass and crops area, out of view of any village or industrial annoyance) (Well almost but some of it does come very close to a historical play park) Anyway, they found an underground housing and tunnel system, Iron Age I guess, an ancient (pretty high and dangerous) waterfall actually right beside it, I mean that can't be a coincidence, I reckon I'd probably settle down by lovely natural waterfall back in the day, who wouldn't? Fresh cold shower every morning, plenty of deer wandering through ready to be hunted and eaten, fresh Salmon jumping the falls?

Anyway here's a thing, it mentions the dig above citing it as being 1973 (seems fair enough) but anyway it's quite an interesting thing itself, if you go through it, it only covers the recorded archaeological finds of that particular year but if you find that interesting then the rest I'm sure can't be that hard to come by. If you find it boring then I can't really fault you either, I find myself boring to be honest but there ya go


The link is a PDF.

Archaelogy Data Services
edit on 9/5/14 by Ramcheck because: I forgot to post 'the thing'



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 05:08 AM
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a reply to: Ramcheck

Do I find it boring? You're talking to someone who has 'The Affinity between the Hebrew language and the Celtic' (full text) pinned to the favourites bar, lol! (I do like a historical fact, or two).

That is a long time for a dig. In fact Carmunock's and the surrounds always managed to resist development, somehow. I'm going to check out your video later today, anyway, and some Assyrian symbolism



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: Ramcheck

Nice link Ram!
I found a reference in the "Lanarkshire" section, to excavations of a possible cairn / mound and various round stone formations at a place called Cleughearn Lodge.
That site is approx 1 mile from where I am sitting (as the crow flies), and I'd never heard of any finds there before!!
Oh, nearly forgot to mention... Cleughearn Lodge is actually up for sale just now! Let's "chip in"?? LOL
G



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: Logarock
Z rod alert! Z rod alert!







May have to reconsider this Z shape above. Found another rendering of it below that shows it with a closed line.



Interesting read.


Read



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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Canaanite/Phoenician Ashtar



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: Logarock

I think it is closed off now you point that out. I had a look through some other cylinder seals and couldn't find another Z.
They were supposed to have invented spoked wheels, the Akkadians, I believe.
I'm liking the look of the double disc/astrological symbol there from Carthage.
This writer Gordi found is interesting too. he makes some wild leaps - I'm still not convinced the Picts were Moloch worshipping baby eaters (well, I hope they weren't, lol) -but he has some good stuff too. Like this:




It dawned on me, therefore (thanks Lorri if I'm correct) that the Picts of Epirus, having been elusive thus far -- though they ought to be there along with Molossus (the mythical brother of Pictus) -- were among those that eventually named Albania. An hypothetical Alba tribe of Illyrians, that is.

Well, in doing a search I found that there was in fact an "Albanoi" tribe of Illyrians thought to have named Albania. Then, on an online navigational map of ancient Illyrium, I found "Albocensii! What excellent timing, Lorri!! I might not have found this so soon had she not led me to take another look at Albania. It reveals so very easily what had never entered my mind before, what I mentioned to Lorri just last night, that the Albi of France were rooted in Illyrians. Moreover, it verifies what I had come to suspect, that Cathars centered in the Albigenses cult were Cutha/Cati Hebrews from Epirus. (If map above is not available, see the same one here)

The Albocensii are at the top-left of the map, significantly north of the Albini tribe thought to have named Albania, however. As my mother is a Masci on one side, I will also point out the Mascianae tribe east of the Albocensii. One can see the Picensii tribe to the south-east of the Albocensii (my mother was born in the town of Picenze (Abruzzo, Italy). Further to the east are the Rhatacensii and the Caucoensii...who no doubt became the Rhaetians/Redones and the Ligurian Cygnus...the Rus side of the dragon bloodline! This was Python-Apollo, the swan and the wolf line, the Ladon eggs of Leto and Leda, that crashed the sun-god bloodline into mythical Eridanus (the Rhodanus = Rhone valley).

None of this proves that the Albanoi and/or Albigenses ancestors connect with the Picts, but it may only be a matter of time, for Lorri revealed that the Albanians were matrilinear, as were the Picts.


Well Albi Damned



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe

You know I haven't been so shocked at the roots or even how easy they seem to be to follow along the trail. But I am never-endingly stunned by the historical generalized interpretations of the Celts and their relationship to Rome, Greece, ect considering the amount of info. Its as though someone purposely threw a blanket on the thing, redirecting our attention to "classical" empires ect without much mention of the Celtic empire. The Celts had already taken over Europe before Rome was even a concern to the Etruscans or the Carthaginians and it looks like about the same of the Greeks.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 01:51 PM
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The Celtic "grove" love was something they picked up from the Canaanites and it follows them everywhere. Not even the Almighty Himself could break them of this fascination with the oak groves and what went on there. One can follow the Celts right out of Canaan by just following this Oak Grove fascination alone.

And there's another thing. We hear all about the classical empires and kingdoms of the middle east. But you will never see the kingdom of Israle put in its proper perspective alongside those kingdoms. And yea at one time the Kingdom of Israle swallowed them all up or where paid tribute. Mentioned as a simple bible story by history, when the Israelis finally overcame the all powerful Philistines in that area it was a major milestone in world history no less than when the Meads-(bunch of crazy bear drinkers) "sacked" Babylon. (oh my bad forgot to mention their Persians buddies)


edit on 10-5-2014 by Logarock because: n



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: Logarock

Yup, I'm going to get stuck into those Greek celts tonight.
I was reading late last night, a book called 'Before Scotland' (Alistair Moffat). Nothing earth shattering, but some interesting bits and pieces (Agricola's lineage for one) and he made a good point which I hadn't considered.
Britain, or more correctly England, began it's love affair with Rome at around the same time that the glory days of the colonies were being rehashed, hence an empire was something to be proud of. Brits saw themselves as following in those noble footsteps, civilising the savages, much like the Romans had to with the Scots and Irish. We had all their written records, no matter how biased, so they made history easy.

It makes sense in this context - in Britain, although Pondering Sceptic for one made it plain that s/he had the same problems - at a certain period in time, history stops. The Vatican is an easy solution, being Rome based and all, but I think it suited more than just them.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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The Albanoi tribe are the first of interest:



Albanopolis (Albanian: Albanopoli, Greek,"Ἀλβανόπολις")[1] was a city in ancient Roman Macedon specifically in Epirus Nova, the city of the Albanoi, an Illyrian tribe. The editors of the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World locate Albanopolis at the modern-day village of Zgërdhesh, near Krujë, Albania.[2][3] It is not certain if the ancient city corresponds with later mentions of it.[4] The city appears at 150 AD almost 300 years after Roman conquest of the region.


They could have been celticised, and moved up through Europe, moving away from the Romans. It's a possibility.

Second the Pictones in France, whom we've seen.

Thirdly the very interesting Dacian tribe, the Albocense:



Albocense (Albocensii) was a Dacian tribe[1] that inhabited the area of Banat (Serbia, Romania) with the towns of Kovin (Contra Margum), Trans Tierna, Ad Medias II, Kladovo (Ad Pontes), Apu, Arcidava, Centum Putea, Ram (Lederata) and Praetorium I. They lived between the Timiş River (Tibiscus) and north of the Saldenses, south of the Biephi.[2] It is believed that the tribe migrated to Spain in Roman times.


With their neighbours and contemporaries the Picensii:



The Tricornenses of Tricornum (modern Ritopek) were a Romanized Thraco-Celtic[1][2] artificially[3] created community by the Romans that replaced the Celtic Celegeri.[4] The inhabitants of Tricornum were Celtic and Thracian, attested by epigraphic sources.[1] After 6 AD, the Tricornenses were one of the four units of Upper Moesia alongside the Dardani, Moesi and Picenses[/]


Take your pick(t).



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: Logarock


Canaanite/Phoenician Ashtar



The Hebrew translation of Ashtar is 'grove'. Funny, eh?



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe

That's interesting.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe

Something else to consider. The first christians to Britain were not from the Roman Catholic tradition. To give an example of how it went.....Leif Eriksson's family were Christianized out of the apostolic tradition. Long story short, it were the Roman Catholics that funded the war against his father and eventually as I understand, overthrew the Eriksson's establishment of Christian throne outside the control of the Roman church. The Eriksson's were actually undertaking missionary work at the time of Erik and his travels abroad were of a missionary nature. Columbus, in this country, is/was greatly hailed as the discover.....as part of the overshadowing of the Eriksson, other Norsemen and many others over the years, of the lands west.

Back to Britain.....by the time of Caratacus the British tribes involved in those wars sported a christian flag. This is long before the Roman Catholics were ever heard of as the official church of Rome. In fact during the days of these wars Paul the apostle as well as most of the others were still alive. My point is that ideas about the Christianization of Britain coming at the hand of the Roman Catholics is just official church and historical propaganda. In fact it is suggested that the primary reasons for this war is because early Christian influences had lead to the rebellion say around 50ad. Well how was Britain influenced by Christianly so early? Well Christ had ordered his disciples to go first to the "lost sheep of the House of Israle" which are the non-Jewish tribes of the old northern kingdom which bore the title "house of Israle" (also known as House of Ephraim, House of Jacob, keepers of the actual birthright) while the Jews are known as "the House of Judah" (keepers of the scepter, House of David).

There is research out there on both of these points.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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Not to ramble but another thing to keep in mind is that the Judah king/queen line had no connection to the old royal lines that came out of the Sumerian area. David, the line of David, was taken literally out of the field tending sheep. This was certainly a cause of great concern for those bloodlines that claimed blood way back to the "gods".



posted on May, 11 2014 @ 04:48 AM
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a reply to: Logarock

Ephraim rings a bell with something I can't put my finger on right now. It'll come back to me.
Yes, I agree. When was Britain colonising the world? 1700's or so. This is the era which Moffat was meaning, when it became 'fashionable' to admire the Romans.
Joseph of Arimathea is meant to have gone to Wales with Mary, Jesus' mother, and built a church there on Anglesey. I am almost certain that Christianity existed in Britain long before the Romans realised they had to keep up with popular opinion if they wanted to keep any influence over the regions.
I keep calling it old testament christianity, I'm not sure what the right term would be, but I'm sure it was known of here and had bugger all to do with Romans.
I didn't know Jesus had sent folk over, but if his mother came it could be assumed she had good reason.




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