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17 California Towns Will Run Out of Water in the Next 60 to 120 days

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posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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This was coming for a long time as so many have stated that California is running dry

www.activistpost.com...




Lompico is one of the affected areas.

“We have been unable to take water out of the creek since August and well production is down, and we didn’t have that much water to begin with.” said Lois Henry from the Lompico water board. She is certain the district will soon have to truck in water.


And more to come:
www.mercurynews.com...

Wells are starting to run dry and reservoir levels are low as the state faces the worst drought in almost a century. The number of vulnerable communities is expected to increase over the coming weeks and months, and the list will be updated weekly said Dave Mazzera, acting drinking water division chief for the California Department of Public Health.

And the help they can expect?

Asked by board member Hank Nordhoff, a San Diego businessman, where the water will come from to bail out small systems, Croyle said he's working on it. "You are going to get it wherever you can get it," he said. Retorted Nordhoff: "That's a frightening reply."

It's going to be a tough time for many and I sure hope they come uip with an answer but this is rough.

It'll be interesting to see how this pans out and what the people do to get through it. Will they resort to violence? Theft?

This might be seen as a small end of days scenario. A glimpse of what people will come up with to get water since it looks like they might not get much help from outside.

Peace


edit on 29-1-2014 by jude11 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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The price of land in well-watered places will sky-rocket this summer.
The Ozarks have remained relatively unscathed by drought, and not impaired by snow storms.
Unfortunately, their relative sparse population will have massive increases.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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Tusks
The price of land in well-watered places will sky-rocket this summer.
The Ozarks have remained relatively unscathed by drought, and not impaired by snow storms.
Unfortunately, their relative sparse population will have massive increases.


And the people with no water will have to sell for pennies on the dollar.

Peace



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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Our well is part of State Water Table Survey. A fellow comes by and measures it times a year. He always lets us know what looks like. At the moment it is exactly like it has been for several years so we should be in good shape. We also have over 3000 gallons in two tanks for reserve.

I have never seen the area up here as dry as it is and most of the folks are freaking out. Our neighbor has gone from 2000 head of cattle to 200 and is thinking of dumping those at auction. Most all the ranchers here will either not move their cows from upcountry or they will sell them off. Those that stay will spend a fortune on feed as there is currently nothing on the ground. Many areas are raw dirt and no weeds at all, long since dried up and blown away.

It's gonna be a rough year for the price of beef. And Veggies.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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Why don't they just do some Cloud Seeding?



Cloud seeding is no longer considered a fringe science, and is considered a mainstream tool to improve rain precipitation and snow. New technology and research have produced reliable results that make cloud seeding a dependable and affordable water-supply practice for many regions.[


Cloud seeding



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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BABYBULL24
Why don't they just do some Cloud Seeding?



Cloud seeding is no longer considered a fringe science, and is considered a mainstream tool to improve rain precipitation and snow. New technology and research have produced reliable results that make cloud seeding a dependable and affordable water-supply practice for many regions.[


Cloud seeding


I thought of that an then I saw this:
5 Examples Of How Agenda 21 Is Increasing The Scope Of Its Enslavement In America

2+2=?

Peace



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 08:52 PM
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Mamatus
Our well is part of State Water Table Survey. A fellow comes by and measures it times a year. He always lets us know what looks like. At the moment it is exactly like it has been for several years so we should be in good shape. We also have over 3000 gallons in two tanks for reserve.

I have never seen the area up here as dry as it is and most of the folks are freaking out. Our neighbor has gone from 2000 head of cattle to 200 and is thinking of dumping those at auction. Most all the ranchers here will either not move their cows from upcountry or they will sell them off. Those that stay will spend a fortune on feed as there is currently nothing on the ground. Many areas are raw dirt and no weeds at all, long since dried up and blown away.

It's gonna be a rough year for the price of beef. And Veggies.




Glad you'll make it ok but it sounds rough for the majority.

Peace



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:05 PM
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I can't find the article I read a few days ago which stated that California gets 1/3 of its water every year from snow melt off the mountains. Also, California's biggest rain and snow months are December, January and February. The mountains are pretty much snowless...

Satellite images don't look good at all.
Sierra Nevada mountain range
Mount Shasta

I wonder if they'll be activating FEMA Region IX



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:26 PM
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Why can't they simply mine/harvest water from the ocean like we do down here? Is there not a coastline for them to work from? They are already importing loads of ground water as it is. What's the problem as to why they aren't collecting from their own coastline? Please educate me on this!



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Thanks for the post. It's serious and it will affect those further then the actual areas because those are big agricultural areas.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:37 PM
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Simple practices could extend this time period and hopefully weather the low availability.

If it's mellow let it yellow, if it's brown flush it down.

Shower every 4th day, wash the pits, groin, and butt only daily.

Install flow regulators on shower heads and faucets.

It'll only shave off a little, as the majority goes to irrigation, but every little bit helps.




posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by Hollie
 


Speaking from the buddy who graduated to go be our local waterworks physicist? It's far harder to get bad water purified than the general population knows--and really that's about all he'd say on it.

But my thinking is that if the Tuna in the water are radioactive, I don't know if I'd want the seawater.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:17 PM
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i will try to get this up but i am a newby and not sure HATFIELD THE RAIN MAKER FROM SAN DIEGO EARLY 1900 interesting story that i remember from school charles hatfield brought down a lot of water san diego history centre if someone can pin this up i am usless
thomas w patterson article the san diego journal of history winter 1970 volume 16 and he worked in l.a too



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:17 PM
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The communities in kern county are property developments that were not properly supplied with water in the first place.

These were get rich quick land developments that the developer set up to sell the property quick and take there money and run.

These were set up so that the home owners ran the water system after the developer sold the property.

These HOAs had no idea how to run a water district and never made the needed improvements to there systems.

These properties were sold years ago as lots and the developer built the water system to supply maybe half the lots and long after the developer sold out and more and more people built homes the systems were never improved.

Now the property owners want bailed out by the county and state.,

Let them haul water till they learn. Most of these people were rich anyway to afford the property.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:30 PM
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A lot of our food production comes from California, this is going to hurt everyone.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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Lompico and some of these other areas have water problems all the time. In fact - some recreational centers in these areas (naturally streaming pools) were closed years ago due to water issues. The fact they are this low is troubling for residents. The ones in Santa Cruz county won't affect crops further down by Monterey but if we begin to see those areas dry up - we have a food problem. Crop areas more inland have water rights to reservoirs. I'm not sure how they are doing right now but with weird weather I would be watching those. In the meanwhile - those in these areas know how to conserve. This is where I learned the saying - If its yellow let it mellow, if its brown flush it down. Only during water shortages of course.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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999zxcv
i will try to get this up but i am a newby and not sure HATFIELD THE RAIN MAKER FROM SAN DIEGO EARLY 1900 interesting story that i remember from school charles hatfield brought down a lot of water san diego history centre if someone can pin this up i am usless
thomas w patterson article the san diego journal of history winter 1970 volume 16 and he worked in l.a too
hello anyone put this story up



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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Hollie
Why can't they simply mine/harvest water from the ocean like we do down here? Is there not a coastline for them to work from? They are already importing loads of ground water as it is. What's the problem as to why they aren't collecting from their own coastline? Please educate me on this!


i'm guessing they didn't think 10 years ago that they'd NEED to so they didn't start building massive plants to do this. it's not like they can just say "oh, lets go get some ocean water" and then *poof* all the water problems are solved. texas is having this same issue right now and if we don't start taking some action we're going to run out of water too. maybe if people would stop saying climate change is a hoax we might be able to prepare a head of time for these things. so, we are going to HAVE to use ocean water at some point but the facilities to do that can't be built overnight.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


It will be the dust bowl in reverse. Welcome back home!


+2 more 
posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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A. Growing food in a dessert is kind of dumb.

B. Herds of water guzzling cattle in a dessert, who would have thought, eh!

C. Building cities in a dessert with millions upon millions of people is also kind of dumb.

D. Using well and bore water like there is no tomorrow is just stupid.

Not having desalination plants considering A, B C and D is just, well, American Politics.

So, who to blame. I know, lets blame global warming deniers, it's all their fault.

Let's put them all in prison.

Jeez! Take a step into the real world.

P



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