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posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 10:55 AM
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I have developed a recipe for bread that turns out pretty tasty. It is definitely not for those who are allergic to gluten but it may be tolerated better by some people than store bought bread.

From research I have found that using a little whole grain light Rye flour in the breads makes the sugars slowly be absorbed. Rye also has some enzymes that help break down the gluten, but if too fast of a yeast is used, they don't have time to work. I buy it at the coop, it costs about a buck seventy a pound. A pound can make a lot of loaves of bread at a tablespoon a loaf. If you want more Rye taste, add up to a quarter cup. Play with this to find how much you desire. Remember that when raising this, you need a little more water though.

There are a lot of medical benefits to using whole grain barley flour also. I like it because it makes bread taste better myself. I use bobs redmill myself, but whole grain barley flour is available at the coop cheaper bulk. It is about four bucks a bag for a pound of bobs red mill, it goes a long way at a tablespoon a loaf.

Wheat germ is separated from commercial flours because it makes them go rancid faster. Adding back some germ helps our body process the bread better. It contains some copper, needed to keep down the inflamation caused by the glutamines and to supply an essential mineral needed to break down glutamates so they can properly be excreted. It also contains some molybdenum, which is necessary to help to break down acetelaldehyde that is formed by eating sugars and starches in the body. There are also other minerals and possibly some good chemistry to this that I have yet to find. Some of these minerals are bound but the yeast can take care of that. It softens the bread a little so it is moister, that I like. A bag of Red mill wheat germ is about six bucks I think but there are a lot of tablespoons in a bag, it lasts about a year for me. The toasted can be in a jar in the cupboard but the untoasted needs to be kept in the fridge. It looks like yeast, so I keep it in the bag so I don't mix them up with a metal spring clip securing the folded top. Remember this, clearly mark the wheat germ, you do not want to ruin something.

The yeast I use is red star. It is not a rapid yeast, it is one that has been around for a while. My parents used this yeast. Maybe even my grandparents, the chemicals it creates seem to be tolerated better by my body than the rapid ones. Maybe it is because of the extra time the enzymes in whole grains have to work, helping the bread to break down. I don't know, it just seems to taste better with this yeast. You can buy the individual packets, they usually cost about a buck for three...too expensive for me, I but the brick of red star yeast at about seven bucks, it comes out to about seven cents a loaf. Why pay more when you don't have to. That brick has enough yeast in it to last over two years. Once open, put in mason jars in the fridge to keep it fresh. I put it into three pint jars so I don't contaminate it all if something happens. Never put a wet spoon in the jar, I learned that the hard way.

I use bread flour for this. Bread flour has more gluten in it. I do know that what I add can correct some of the gluten problems to a point. To switch to all purpose it may need some refining, I have had a lot of problems with collapsing bread if I use the all purpose flours because I am utilizing enzymes contained in the additions to the bread. I use Dakota made flour myself, it costs about ten bucks for twenty five pounds here. There are major differences in flours, be aware of that. There is combinations of winter, spring, and summer wheats in them. This does make a difference, if using another brand a slight adjustment may be necessary.

I use Sea salt, the recipe I have designed is for sea salt, which has larger crystals. If using finer salt, reduce the salt by about a quarter, as the regular salt has less airspace in it so there is a lot more salt in the spoon.

I use regular olive oil most times, not the extra virgin. If I don't have it I use mazola. It only takes a couple of tablespoons of oil. I think a person could use some coconut oil, but I don't know how this would melt into the flours.

Of course, I prefer pure cane sugar from Hawaii, but that does not make much of a difference.


I suppose I should post the recipe. I use a bread machine to do all the mixing myself, but thoroughly mix the flours salt and sugar together in a bowl then add the oil just before putting it in the machine, dumping the proofed yeast mixture in on top.


Add all the below into a small mixing bowl, mixing them together before adding the oil. Dump into bread machine pan.

2 1/2 c bread flour
1 T wheat germ
1 T whole grain light rye flour
1 T whole grain barley flour
1 t sugar
1 1/2 t sea salt
2 T oil

In a cup mix the following together, adding a little more water may be necessary depending on the flours. let this stand about five minutes to proof...gets foamy on top a little.

1 cup of Warm water
2 1/4 teaspoons of yeast
1/2 teaspoon of sugar.

Dump the proofed yeast mixture on top the flour in the bread machine pan and set on dough cycle. Make sure you add the yeast mixture on top. That dust sure does get all over the machine if you forget.


After the cycle is complete, pull the bread away from the edges of the pan a little and dump onto floured counter. Spread out into a square about an inch thick and roll up to put into a larger bread pan. We have about three sizes of these, I think they got different names but I am not a woman, I don't even want to know the names. To me they are like the three bears, they are all different sizes of the same thing. You can also make rolls out of this at this point, just cut in chunks and put on a flat pan with sides.

Cover with a small cloth towl and Put in warm place for about an hour, in the pan, it needs to be rounded on top the pan.

I bake mine in the woodstove so I do not know the heat setting. I would guess about 350 degrees. Bake it for about thirty two minutes, spinning it around if it is in a wood cookstove oven half way through. Tap on the top, it should sound sort of hollow. Butter the loaf top and remove it from the pan, toss it back on the shelf in the oven for about four minutes, it helps make the side and bottom crust taste better. Remove and throw on rack to cool. Leave it sit at least twenty five minutes before cutting.

The rolls take about twenty five minutes to bake, butter the tops when taking it out of the oven also. No need to brown the bottom of these. They make great hamburger buns. It makes about ten buns big enough for a hamburger, shaping them for hot dogs is possible also.

The cost of a loaf or the buns comes to about sixty cents. It may be a little higher depending where you live. Remember, this is using the bulk red star yeast, I get it from GFS. Add another twenty five cents a loaf if using the packets...that is a forty five percent increase in the cost of a loaf. If you have never made bread, buy the packets first to try this. No use wasting the yeast. Also, buying bulk and dividing it up between three families is a good idea. You can get bread flour on sale at about the same price per pound as buying the twenty five pounders also, you do not need to buy that much at a time if you want to try this.




posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 10:59 AM
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I'm open to learning new ways to create new recipes. You can alter this and I would be interested in hearing about it. I will take the new chemistry you create and find out the effect on how the body processes this altered recipe. I added a small amount of turmeric to a few batches, turmeric is a maoi inhibitor and some may like that. The buzz lasts a little longer. Turmeric also helps to keep blood pressure a little lower, the curcumins in it help.

Here is an article of the effect of salt on bread, something some may find interesting. www.sciencedirect.com...
edit on 27-1-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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Now you make me want to go out and buy a bread machine. You provide so much chemistry information and I really do appreciate that.

The person who taught me how to make bread used 50 pounds of flour as she baked for a military base,
That was in the good days before I moved to a place whose stores do not sell any caked yeast. Now I can't seem to make bread well anymore. I have to admit that I've kind of given up and resort to buying frozen dough, which is not the same, but is only one degree better than the chemical tasting stuff on the shelves.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by aboutface
 


I don't much like the commercial breads either. There are a few local bakeries that make decent bread but they cost a pretty penny. I can't see spending almost five bucks for a loaf of bread. I was surprised that adding healthy ingredients costs so little more. I have tried oats, but that didn't turn out so good tasting. I tried whole wheat flour but wasn't impressed, but then again I don't really care for any whole wheat breads. I like whole multigrain breads the best as long as there is mostly white flour in them. I even tried egg in the breads but eggs taste better in sweet breads The taste of the egg doesn't seem to mix well with some foods either.

You don't need a bread machine, the mixing can be done by hand. I'm lazy though, I like the mixing cycle on the bread machine.
If I had to I would mix everything by hand. Bread machines go for about five bucks at rummage sales though, I always see them around in the summer. We bought ours new many years ago and the fad died. The bread machine cooked breads have the same taste but the texture is not usually right. It crumbles when making sandwiches.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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Funny you say that about the oat bread. A former workmate of mine used to make a honey oat bread that was truly delicious. She was always adding stuff to it and experimenting, but unfortunately I've lost touch with her. I will keep an eye out this summer for a machine though and try it out.

Have you tried quinoa flour? I'll have to check if my bulk food store carries it, as it is supposed to increase volume and texture as another article in your source claims here
edit on 27-1-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 05:29 PM
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aboutface
Funny you say that about the oat bread. A former workmate of mine used to make a honey oat bread that was truly delicious. She was always adding stuff to it and experimenting, but unfortunately I've lost touch with her. I will keep an eye out this summer for a machine though and try it out.

Have you tried quinoa flour? I'll have to check if my bulk food store carries it, as it is supposed to increase volume and texture as another article in your source claims here
edit on 27-1-2014 by aboutface because: (no reason given)


Never used quinoa flour. I should try it to see what flavor it has. I have a vegetarian living next door and she said that quinoa is not very tasty. I have a jar of some seeds that I can grind up, they are actually a hot cereal. I could also just buy some next time I go to the coop, I think it is bulk there. I would need to study the nutrients it has and any associated cross reactivities that are known about quinoa.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 06:23 PM
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Please be sure to let us know whenever you try it. I'm really interested.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 07:07 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I LOVE bread and have been making my own bread since I was a kid. It was the first "from scratch" thing I learned from my mom. She was always making bread.


I will try your recipe and let you know how it turns out. I LOVE rye and rye bread is one of my favs. I have some rye flour too. I just need a couple other ingredients which i can get at the health food store tomorrow. I have been wanting to make a bread this week but not sure what kind so I'll make this!


Thanks for the recipe and all the information you posted with it.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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I'd be interested in trying this, but as a bread noob, I don't have a bread machine....and have no clue as to how long to knead, etc.
Any and all help would be appreciated



And rickymouse, I love your posts about food, they are always so informative....I always learn something,.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 09:44 PM
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rickymouse
I'm open to learning new ways to create new recipes. You can alter this and I would be interested in hearing about it. I will take the new chemistry you create and find out the effect on how the body processes this altered recipe. I added a small amount of turmeric to a few batches, turmeric is a maoi inhibitor and some may like that. The buzz lasts a little longer. Turmeric also helps to keep blood pressure a little lower, the curcumins in it help.

Here is an article of the effect of salt on bread, something some may find interesting. www.sciencedirect.com...
edit on 27-1-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)


Baker by trade here!

Nice recipe.


Try here for some great bread recipes and techniques if you like.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Peace



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:08 PM
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DontTreadOnMe
I'd be interested in trying this, but as a bread noob, I don't have a bread machine....and have no clue as to how long to knead, etc.
Any and all help would be appreciated



And rickymouse, I love your posts about food, they are always so informative....I always learn something,.



It's so long ago that I kneaded dough by hand, other than some sweet breads and pizza crust dough, that I can't even remember the exact way to do that. Maybe one of the others here may be better at telling you that. Actually I should really relearn that, I can't be firing up the generator for an hour and a half to run the bread machine to mix the dough if we lose power for any amount of time.
Maybe mblahnikluver will respond to help us.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I noticed that by adding the rye flour, it needed less salt. The taste of salt is influenced by the taste of chloride, that is why potasium chloride (nosalt) tastes so much like salt. Rye flour is higher in chloride. so when craving salt most of the time you are craving chloride.

I've been looking for both plant and animal sources of chloride. Fish is high in chloride. Celery is high in chloride too. Many things contain chloride but it isn't in the right form we need.

I saw less salt in the multigrain recipe you had listed on your link so I had to say this.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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DontTreadOnMe
I'd be interested in trying this, but as a bread noob, I don't have a bread machine....and have no clue as to how long to knead, etc.
Any and all help would be appreciated



And rickymouse, I love your posts about food, they are always so informative....I always learn something,.



Great help here...

www.thefreshloaf.com...

Peace



posted on Feb, 18 2014 @ 12:56 AM
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