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The Petroglyphs of Hawaii

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posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 08:35 PM
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Greetings ATS; I would like to share a topic with you well suited for the active and lurker members alike!
A couple months ago I had the pleasure of visiting a friend of mine who lives in the Waikaloa Village area on the big island of Hawaii. Although we did spend every waking minute exploring every place imaginable, I was fortunate that my friend lived within minutes of this petroglyph site I’m about to discuss.

The native term for petroglyph is Ki‘i Pōhaku. Similar to how petro means “stone” and glyph means “caving”, ki‘i means “image” and pōhaku means stone.

There are 100’s of locations in Hawaii you can find petroglyphs but for now our focus will be those at Waikoloa Field found behind the Waikoloa Beach Resort, so it is very accessible to tourists and explorers alike. For those just looking for a quick and easy peak and one of Hawaii’s most ancient mysteries, you can find several astonishing petroglyphs positioned neatly at the start of the trail. These, although authentic, have certainly been moved here at a more recent time and depict a more modern style which we'll discuss further.

Let’s begin with these:



The glyphs of turtles, canoes, oars are said to be post 1900 whereas some later in the thread others have been carbon dated to be 100's of years old. There exact purpose no one knows for sure.

I read somewhere that the dots represent the number in the group who made the hike to this sacred spot to perform the umbilical ritual.



They would come to this spot and lay the umbilical cord overnight and when they woke in the morning they would get there dried shriveled remains as a good luck token. If it was missing it meant misfortune for the child and many times that child would be given away. It is said that the mice would come and steal the umbilical cord like a thief in the night which represented the potential behavior of the child. There is also a local legend of the Menehune but we'll leave that for another thread.








posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 08:45 PM
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After taking a 20 minute trail (use that term loosely) you get to a boardwalk of sorts that keeps you from stepping on the glyphs on the lava bed.

Here is an image of the path you take:



I came to a cave that was just too curious not to explore. I was looking to see if there were any petroglyphs on the walls. hmmm, bad juju...I wouldn't be surprised if this is where I got bit by a brown recluse or a centipede. Respect the island, I know, I know.



Once you get to the boardwalk its actually quite beautiful:




posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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Spent time on kauai as a youby adult

The menehune have intrigued me ever since

And these glyphs have sparked a renewed sense of awe for the islanders

S/f



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 09:01 PM
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When you actually look out to the field itself there are 100's if not thousands scattered everywhere. They are kind of hard to make out in these pictures.



and:



You can see the rocks protecting the petroglyph so no one steps on them. Good thinking, but fact is none of this is protected very well at all. There is even a board from the Hawaiian Antiquities basically stating, they're not completely sure who put them here or why. Also that they're not protected so if you'd like to help please call us... and another very interesting point. Apparently 80% of them are facing the island not the ocean. Hmmm, think there was something they were aware of? rumble rumble.

There is a local researcher by the name of Ski Kwaiatkowski and he has this to say:




Among the most significant new findings—information that was not scientifically proven in 1991—is the age of the rock carvings found along the Ala Loa Trail (more commonly known as the King’s Trail) at Waikoloa. Using Carbon 14 dating, Professors Ron Dorn and Nicole Cerveny of Arizona State University’s Geology Department have determined the oldest petroglyph in the Waikoloa field was created in 840 AD and the most recent in 1900, according to Kwaiatkowski. “I believe petroglyph-making remained active and wide-spread in the islands just prior to the arrival of Captain Cook. For some unknown reason, after the arrival of Cook and all those other guys (early explorers), it died off relatively quickly,” he says.


I liked this too:




“Hawaiian are very sensitive to places with high energy or areas with “power spots,” containing special mana (power)…this is where the highest concentration of k‘i‘i pōhaku are found,”


Source



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 09:10 PM
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Another_Nut
Spent time on kauai as a youby adult

The menehune have intrigued me ever since

And these glyphs have sparked a renewed sense of awe for the islanders

S/f


It's still quite the active meme out there presently also. Talked about often it seems in random conversations. The original story as I know it was they were one of the races of Mu. Little people who would build new structures over night. If it wasn't completed in one night they would abandon it.

While I was out there it seemed many use it as a story of little menehune stealing babies in the night if the kids aren't good...



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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Menehune liked their stone

Can't help but think there is a link to the groups

Going to dig into kauais groups here shortly to see what the have to connect the two

Menehune fish pond

en.m.wikipedia.org...
edit on 26-1-2014 by Another_Nut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 09:15 PM
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Do you know when these glyphs were first documented?



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 09:19 PM
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Tusks
Do you know when these glyphs were first documented?


I don't but it seems they didn't get much notice until the last few decades.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 07:40 AM
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Here you can see a bowl shaped in the rock presumably to crush and grind plant material. It should be noted here that these two pics were along the trail and there is nothing protecting these from ruin.



And here it appears they were sharpening rock or tools.



I would love if anyone with knowledge about this site stop in and share some thoughts. There isn't much known so much is open for speculation.
edit on 27-1-2014 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-1-2014 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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Fascinating thanks for sharing!!



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 12:57 PM
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It fascinates me that so much traditional knowledge from so many ancient cultures was handed down for millennia, then 'religious' men came along and proceeded to remove all traces of earth's history in the name of 'Christianity'.

It also disgusts me.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by Rosinitiate
 


The round depression was probably used to smash taro root to make poi.

Many stories are told about the menehune. The native Hawaiians never really ventured much into the interior of the islands, so what lived there was always somewhat mystical in nature. I know that messing with the petroglyphs is considered "kapu" or forbidden and can carry bad luck.

Oh, and if you go to Hawaii -- leave the rocks alone. Bringing rocks back from Hawaii is considered bad luck. Also, you might end up bringing home a lost spirit. Every year tons of people mail back rocks they have taken from Hawaii.

I was just in Maui about a month in a half ago, I didn't get to see any petroglyphs this time, but they sure are fascinating, eh?



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


Ugh why did you have to say poi?

I was eating

Now my appetite is gone

Ty Mr moderator



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 06:56 PM
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When I was stationed out there there was a story of the Menehune running a group of Marines off a sheer bluff thousands of feet tall. 8 of them total, only one survived. Creepy little bastards near as I can tell.

Thanks for the thread. I miss the islands very much.

BTW, it was likely a centipede that bit you. Hawaii grows some god awful hideous centipedes. They can be nearly a foot long.

ETA: Anybody here ever seen the sacrificialrock at the top of kole kole pass?
The view from up there is INCREDIBLE!
edit on 31-1-2014 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:07 PM
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I remember seeing a wonderful petroglyph at Anaehoomalu (the name of the bay around which the Waikoloa resort was built, I prefer that name). It was an image of a chief (recognizable by his headdress) with a curly tailed dog in his belly. I guess it was to commemorate a particularly good meal.



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Rosinitiate
 




Here you can see a bowl shaped in the rock presumably to crush and grind plant material.

Possible, but the Hawaiians usually used actual bowls (of stone or wood) for such tasks. Perhaps a evaporative pan for making salt from sea water. Was it on a level area?

lovingthebigisland.files.wordpress.com...
edit on 1/31/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:10 PM
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Phage
I remember seeing a wonderful petroglyph at Anaehoomalu (the name of the bay around which the Waikoloa resort was built, I prefer that name). It was an image of a chief (recognizable by his headdress) with a curly tailed dog in his belly. I guess it was to commemorate a particularly good meal.




Mmmm mmmm
Haha!

I think I would eat just about anything before dog. Even octopus.


ETA: anyone here play slack key guitar?
edit on 31-1-2014 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:16 PM
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I've always wanted to climb Mount Waialelae. It's pretty dangerous due to the fact that GPS isn't reliable in the jungle. There really isn't any trail, and it's among one of the wettest places on Earth.

People have, as I linked to above -- and none of them ran across any little people in the forest. People have gotten lost and died, oh and then there are the wild boars.

Somehow though, the ancient Hawaiians got up there and built a monument.

Gotta love Kauai!



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


Send me a plane ticket and ill be right next to ya!

But please no poi talk!

Still trying to get that taste out ofr my mouth

Where the maitai?
edit on pm120143107America/ChicagoFri, 31 Jan 2014 19:24:11 -0600_1u by Another_Nut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by Another_Nut
 


I thought about doing it expedition style a lot of gear, and a lot of camps, similar to Everest or Denali. Go slow, but have all the gear you need to be safe. You'd probably end up climbing the mountain a total of 4 times LOL.





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