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Does fear of death drive the instinct to survive in animals (and plants)?

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posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 

I posted this thread a long time ago about an animal that turns itself in to a plant.

Now thats amazing, this plantimal want's to survive no matter what.

Does it keep it's "consciousness" when it does so, cause that would prove that plants do have some sort of consciousness.

Danish researchers have discovered a mysterious creature that is neither animal nor plant.
edit on 25-1-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by StarlightNine
 


Here, start with this. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...
You might find some of it pretty interesting.

Also, google plant perception and see what comes up.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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I don't think animals have any notion of death, they may see it happening around them but they do not relate that phenomena with themselves. I think what drives animals to survive and to flee danger is the fear of pain and instincts instilled in them at birth. By the time an animal can relate death with themselves they are already dead in my opinion. Most if not all animals are not self-aware and I believe self-awareness is needed to know death and its inevitability.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Mianeye
 


If you look back through my posts, you'll see that I mentioned a book which describes experiments to that effect. Plants are conscious, to an extent.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by coolcatt
 



PE: How do animals and possibly plants understand what death is?



coolcatt
reply to post by PhotonEffect
 

CC: This is a hard one.
Maybe they have to experience near death,close call etc to know its not a good thing to be doing this. Maybe fear it the key to life.


Yes, I considered this. That animals surely go thru instances where they've experienced an event that causes them pain, which form learning, will drive their future behaviors to protect against that. But I'm sure there could be plenty of animals who have never experienced pain or near death and still react to danger...



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
 


Fear of pain from previous experiences are definitely part of it, but doesn't explain all of it.

Even one sees others in the herd die around them means that animals understand the concept of death and do not want that for themselves, if it drives future behavior. An instinct to survive goes only so far though- how does one know if the alligator gazing in its direction is a danger to its life if it's never experienced an alligator before?



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Genetic memory may explain it. DNA can and does store information so maybe past generations store this information in their DNA and it is passed down to their children and grandchildren. How does a sea turtle know how to get back to its place of birth from thousands of miles away after only being their at birth years and years earlier?

Maybe a herd sees and hears one of its own getting eaten by a lion and that triggers the DNA to release this information which in turn triggers the instinct of fight or flight? I have no good answer, only speculation. Good question though.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Do not think fear.... just think "good" and "not good", or "bad".

All of our known reality is "good" concept (re)production.

Their "fear" is their (re)production of what they perceive to be a "good" reaction / concept to what they perceive as "not good". Basically, they are producing "good" where they sense "not good" -- which is in their minds. It is the same as if they are walking normally. They perceive their next step to be a "good" response to their current location...

Every action is "good" concept (re)production, and every form, is the image of those actions.

However, their reaction to what is "bad" may not be experienced emotionally, by them, in the manner that we experience "fear".

The nature of this is derived from God. It is his will that this thing we call reality, be just / good creation, and so that is what we are doing...

Further, I think it is a byproduct of God being good, but I cannot say that is necessarily true -- not that God is not good, He is good, but that our actions are a reflection of his good. That is, our actions may be a reflection of his desire to have us produce good concepts, rather than it being a reflection of his will. For all I know, he has created a reality where things behave the opposite of this reality, thus reflecting that we are not doing good as a reflection of his "nature" but by his will a lone.

If you do not understand the concepts herein, let me know, and I will rephrase it for you.

Edit: To make it easy for you, think of it like sensors and interpretations. What their sense is, could be butterflies or they could "hear" in their mind's eye a "bad" sound when they see a "bad" image, and we may never know. What is obvious, however, is that they are creating their version of "good", as determined by their minds or interpreters or sensors...

Even Satan is doing his version of "good", it just happens to be unjust, therefor bad. Bad is an understatement, but you get the point.
edit on 1/25/2014 by Bleeeeep because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by Bleeeeep
 


Fear = stress = not good.

What's good about that?



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 

Fear is good.
Too much unjust fear, or dwelling on fear, is bad.
It is like eating versus being a glutton.

Even happiness can corrupt you, if it is not just.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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They possibly fear death in the form of starvation that propels them to satisfy basic needs that humans overlook in our day to day lifes. What we take for the granted, in the animal kingdom is of the utmost importance...



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


I think this new thread is interesting on this subject

link



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 08:08 AM
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For every living species on Earth today, there might have been 10 times that amount that didn't self preserve.
Any organism in an ecosystem that didnt ensure safe passage of it's genetic cargo from one generation to the next wouldn't be here would it?



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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Jukiodone
For every living species on Earth today, there might have been 10 times that amount that didn't self preserve.
Any organism in an ecosystem that didnt ensure safe passage of it's genetic cargo from one generation to the next wouldn't be here would it?


So how does this answer the questions proposed? Mainly if an animal's survival instinct is driven by an understanding what death is.



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