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Football vs. Soccer

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posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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I came across this little vid of a classic reenactment of some YouTube comments/argument about Football vs Soccer. It reminded me of some of the brilliant conversation we see here on ATS, and so I thought I'd share!


It's amazing how articulate some YouTubers really are!
Warning: colorful language!



Every ATS argument should be read by these guys!




posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


Brilliant!

Thank's for sharing.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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I can't watch the video on this browser, but here are my own thoughts'
"Soccer" is a British word in origin. It is one of those words which has gone out of use in its home country, and stayed in use elsewhere.

Non-Brits will probably not reailse that there are class-warfare overtones in this.
Of the two English football codes, Association football tended to be a sport with working-class interest, while Rugby Football tended to be of more interest to the upper classes, who played it in their "public schools".
But the two abbreviations, "Soccer" and "Rugger" were both given by the upper classes (the "er" ending gives it away.)
So "Soccer" was a working-class sport with a non-working-class nickname.

One of the effects of the Sixties in Britain was that the upper classes lost their influence over popular culture, which became more working class.
This was fatal for the use of the word "soccer".
As far as the working class was concerned, the national sport, soccer, had always been called "football". If this sport alone was being called "football", the word "soccer" itself was redundant, and stopped being used.
However, other countries continue to borrow words like "futball" or "socero" quite indifferently, completely oblivious to the social overtones of these words in their native country.
Especially, of course, countries like America or Australia who have native "football" codes of their own, and need a separate word for "soccer" to avoid confusion.




edit on 25-1-2014 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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I wont see youtube comments the same way anymore,

thanks



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by DISRAELI
 


HAHA! Thanks for the well thought out response and the critique for the possible misunderstandings and arguments that may ensue, due to the confusions and cultural differences that may be in place, regarding soccer and football!

Unfortunately, the conversation in the above video doesn't deserve your insight! LOL

I hope that you watch this hilarious video, this is not unlike some ATS convos, at some point in the future!




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