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New study: 50% of Black and 40% of White males arrested by age 23.

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posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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Nearly Half Of Black Males, 40 Percent Of White Males Are Arrested By Age 23: Study.


The study, published on Monday in the journal Crime & Delinquency, found that nearly half (49 percent) of African-American men and 40 percent of white men have been arrested by the age of 23, "which can hurt their ability to find work, go to school and participate fully in their communities," according to a press release.

The research was based on an analysis of national survey data from 1997 to 2008 of teenagers and young adults. The arrests included minor crimes like truancy as well as serious violent crimes. It excluded traffic offenses.

Imagine if they factored in traffic violations...

Of-course being arrested can hurt someone's ability to "find work, go to school" etc., thats the whole point! To strip you of your rights, especially gun rights, to collect your biometric data and to add you to yet another database.

What do people expect? We are living in a fully realized Police State Industrial Complex.

For-profit-prisons which lobby politicians for ever increasing rules, regulations and laws.

Mandatory minimum sentencing.

Civil/asset forfeiture/confiscation laws.

An ever increasing militarized/violent police force...




posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


Being one of them i can tell you through first hand experience this is how their controlling us.

No job unless they say so, no guns, no anything unless they say now.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Are you denying you violated the law and faced the consequences of such violation?



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


I think this reflects more poorly on the shape of our society, culture, and the people in it than the law enforcement and the laws of each state and the federal government. People don't have values and respect for others or the law anymore. It doesn't help much when celebrities and other role models for children in this country (regardless if they are our chosen role models, they are role models) have no respect for others or the law. Look at all of the "idols" that kids look up to and the message they send kids (e.g. Bieber's DUI, etc. today).
edit on 23-1-2014 by ExNihiloRed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


This is why I have gone off grid as much as possible without running into the woods. The US legal system has become so weighed down with petty laws (many are felonies) that it doesn't pay to do anything that may have any contact with law enforcement. This includes driving around for fun or simply spending time at the mall. Even when they simply enforce statutes they become a threat to most people (as in you're probably doing something illegal whether you know it or not.)

I remember an America where we were free to do much as we pleased and go where we wanted. Sadly that America is dead and gone.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by Bassago
 


Can you help me understand what laws you are referring to?

Also, can you expound on how you can go less places and do less than you could in the past? What specifically?



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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The research was based on an analysis of national survey data from 1997 to 2008 of teenagers and young adults. The arrests included minor crimes like truancy as well as serious violent crimes. It excluded traffic offenses.


Truancy is a criminal offence in the US? Isn't that just missing school?

I can't even imagine how high the percentage would be if they included traffic offences. It would probably push those white numbers a little higher



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 


i would be curious to know what the percentile of these arrest were alcohol related



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by hopenotfeariswhatweneed
 


In addition, there is a fundamental difference between being arrested and being prosecuted and incarcerated. Underage drinking might get you tallied in the arrest statistics. Things may not be as dire as this thread attempts to elucidate.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 


"The law" it can be anything. Its not set in stone. You can be arrested and charged if the cop doesnt like you.
I had a friend who was searched illegally after exiting a public bathroom. In the jailhouse she heard the cop discussing adding a charge to justify the search so the search would stick.

(She had a pill in her pocket that she proved she had a prescription for later.)

The system is levied against the average citizen. When you are charged and convicted of a something that doesn't hurt anyone or yourself, you think thats a good thing?

Ive had friends get public into outside of a bar smoking. They were just a bit drunk, no attempt to drive home. I maybe understand if someone is falling over themselves, but really its just b.s. enforcement of a b.s. law created to hurt regular Joe's.

Another situation. A guy getting locked up for urinating outside, even though its dark and he wasn't exposed to anyone. He gets indecent exposure with the possibility of being registered as a sex offender. Garbage laws. So your, did you/they break the law statement earlier is pointless.

Yesterday Justin Beiber was arrested and charged with things (drag racing under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs, and resisting arrest). A normal person would likely go to jail for months and have their future and careers ruined. He won't serve a day despite going 30+ mph over in a country where heb isn't a citizen while high out of his mind and resisting cops.
edit on 23-1-2014 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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ExNihiloRed
reply to post by Bassago
 


Can you help me understand what laws you are referring to?

Also, can you expound on how you can go less places and do less than you could in the past? What specifically?


I'll let you use the Google machine to look up ridiculous US laws. Then you'll need to categorize them by date and frankly I can't be bothered, sorry don't mean to insult but I'm out of that now. If you really want to know do the research, you'll not be happy about it though.

As far as travel (not counting the illegal checkpoints) the chances of having an altercation (being stopped) by the police is fairly high. The more you drive the higher the chance. It's at that point where things become dangerous to citizens these days. In the past (20+ years and more) I've driven cross country without even noticing a cop. Not the case now. A militant police force is the norm nowadays, whether people wish to acknowledge it or not. This ain't your grandpa's USA.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


First off, you demonstrate a horrid misunderstanding of the criminal justice system and the three branches of government. The law is not "anything," it is the law and they exist in each state and federally. You can look them up. In the most basic sense, it tells you what you cannot do. Of course they can change and evolve over time, but generally law are not enforced retroactively (i.e., if you did it before the law was enacted you cannot be prosecuted under the law for violating it).

A cop CAN arrest you if he does not like you, but charges are pressed by the prosecutor and will not likely go far if the charge is "not liking the person." Although unfortunately not always the case, you won't be prosecuted unless there is sufficient evidence against you. If you are illegally searched, your constitutional rights have been violated and evidence found on you will be suppressed when they try and actually prosecute you.

Don't get me wrong, the system is not perfect, but it is a better system BY FAR than any other country in the world. Do you even know what a luxury it is in this country to be innocent until proven guilty?



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 





People don't have values and respect for others or the law anymore.


Replace the word 'People' with 'Police' and I'll agree with you.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:35 PM
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Arrested != Convicted

Even beyond that, sorry, those numbers are definitely suspect.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by Bassago
 


Research Camden, New Jersey and tell me more about a militant police force.

There may be silly laws on the books that are archaic but they are not enforced anymore. Those laws make great BuzzFeed articles. Do I think too many people are prosecuted and prosecuted too harshly for marijuana use? Yes. Do I think corruption exists? Yes. Do I think many prosecutors lose sight of their true purpose, seeking justice, for high conviction rates? Absolutely. I know there are problems with the system, but I feel like you're ignoring all of the positives and a bit misguided.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 


I actually do not demonstrate a poor (let alone horrid ) understanding of the system. Spare me your hyperbole it doesn't make you correct and if it makes you appear that way it's only to the easily influenced.

I understand it very well. You just missed the point apparently.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by Visitor2012
 


I can understand and agree that certain law enforcement officers may be corrupt, but I just don't think it is the norm. Although, recently, when I've dealt with police officers they have been as* holes to me. Still...



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 


Everything you just listed pretty much negates the whole system. Especially when you start adding in corrupt judges selling convictions and corrupt forensics workers doing the same.

As for your statement about it not sticking when cops arrest someone because they dont like them. You claim the prosecutor won't follow through. Maybe you watch too much csi or maybe you are just incredibly naive about how the system works (ie have a horrid understanding), but the prosecutor will trust the cops judgement in 99 percent of the cases. If you want to argue that those instances of people being screwed over dont make it to court.. fine go ahead, but you know youbare wrong.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


You drastically edited your response. The one I responded to was much shorter. I will need to read what you said in detail to better respond to your most recent post.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by ExNihiloRed
 


It is absolutely the norm. The ones that arent corrupt in their actions, without doubt, remains silent on the corruption of others. When they talk they are fired. The majority of police are corrupt. From the biggest city to the smallest town.

I lived in a small city of 12000 and the police force had to let go of like 8 cops and close one of their stations over a scandal involving prostitution and drugs.



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