It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What's in a Word: Create?

page: 2
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 02:40 PM
link   
You are right, they don't have a translation to English. But interesting enough they resemble Alpha and Omega. Remember that letter "Bet" means the same if you read it right or backwards? Take a good look at letters "Bet" and "Tav".
They look the same but written differently, now remember that alpha and omega are greeks letters not Hebrew.
Meaning that God is the beginning and the beginning, He does not have an end. He is eternal. The Ouroboros.

Keep studying, you are on the right path. I'm an eternal student.
This just the first verse of the Bible, imagine what others mysteries are ahead.




posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 04:03 PM
link   
a reply to: Abednego

The Apocalypse, the last book of the Bible, ends with the words:

...μετὰ πάντων ἁγίων Ἀμήν



Transliterated 'Meta panton hageon amen' -- word by word translated: 'with all holy Amen.'

Looking at the ending of the Apocalypse in the opposite end of the Bible from Genesis 1:1, there is a similar word to Hebrew "accusative marker" את, and that's Heb אמן transliterated into Gr ἀμήν "amen".

Going through Strong's numbers 539 through 552 אמן 'amn' and derivations has many lexical definitions. As an adverb it means "truly" or "verily", but as a verb it means "to believe" and as a noun m. אמן means "faithfulness" and "master" or "artist", depending on vocalisation. As noun f. becomes אמנה "faith" or "upbringing" and "nourishment" and finally, אמנות meaning "pillar".

In the Greek NT texts it is left untranslated. As in the quote above, it is transliterated from the Heb אמן into Gr ἀμήν and often so, further into Eng "Amen" in many modern bible versions. In the Gospels, ἀμήν is often translated into "truly" or "verily", but also simply left to read Amen. Jesus seems to use this word a lot, typically along the lines of "Verily, verily I say to you...", he even keeps repeating it, as if to emphasise the Emphasiser so to speak. Sort of reminding me of Jesu' words:

Truly, I say to you […] Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.



Refs:
==> biblehub.com... (last verse of the Apocalypse - interlinear)
==> biblehub.com... (compare with Strong's 539 through 552)



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 04:24 PM
link   

originally posted by: Maltese5Rhino
reply to post by Utnapisjtim
 


'Created the Heaven and the earth', the earth could be deemed 'created' once someone first was able to farm the earth, to make shelter from the earth and in so doing created 'heaven' so to speak.


Now that the thunder has calmed, I have to give you some credits as opposed to my former replies to you in this thread, for you pose a valid point about agriculture and such. Point as in the compass point of the Great Architect, origo of the compass rose (the cross) and Solomon's lily (the hexagon) and all of creation. The main instrument of an architect is his pair of compasses. Others who use them are geographers, astronomers and navigators. Mapping the heavens and the earth ie. conquering the land and the seas, receiving knowledge and inspiration by looking at Heavens above. And receive their powers and "divine rights of kings" from up above through astrology and pantheism...
edit on 12-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: misc.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 08:14 AM
link   

originally posted by: Utnapisjtim
a reply to: Abednego

The Apocalypse, the last book of the Bible, ends with the words:

...μετὰ πάντων ἁγίων Ἀμήν



Transliterated 'Meta panton hageon amen' -- word by word translated: 'with all holy Amen.'

Looking at the ending of the Apocalypse in the opposite end of the Bible from Genesis 1:1, there is a similar word to Hebrew "accusative marker" את, and that's Heb אמן transliterated into Gr ἀμήν "amen".

Going through Strong's numbers 539 through 552 אמן 'amn' and derivations has many lexical definitions. As an adverb it means "truly" or "verily", but as a verb it means "to believe" and as a noun m. אמן means "faithfulness" and "master" or "artist", depending on vocalisation. As noun f. becomes אמנה "faith" or "upbringing" and "nourishment" and finally, אמנות meaning "pillar".

In the Greek NT texts it is left untranslated. As in the quote above, it is transliterated from the Heb אמן into Gr ἀμήν and often so, further into Eng "Amen" in many modern bible versions. In the Gospels, ἀμήν is often translated into "truly" or "verily", but also simply left to read Amen. Jesus seems to use this word a lot, typically along the lines of "Verily, verily I say to you...", he even keeps repeating it, as if to emphasise the Emphasiser so to speak. Sort of reminding me of Jesu' words:

Truly, I say to you […] Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.



Refs:
==> biblehub.com... (last verse of the Apocalypse - interlinear)
==> biblehub.com... (compare with Strong's 539 through 552)

Remember this, Amen it could be the Word (is a name). The letter aleph is silent ( you do not pronounce it unless it has the ' mark ). So is just "MN". "... but my WORD will not pass away", He may be speaking of His father.
An interesting note is that the name Amon-Ra in Egypt is spell the same way but with the letter Yod at the beginning.
A theory I have is that they have the same GOD.
Isaiah 19:24
24In that day Israel will be the third party with Egypt and Assyria, a blessing in the midst of the earth, 25whom the LORD of hosts has blessed, saying, "Blessed is Egypt My people, and Assyria the work of My hands, and Israel My inheritance."



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: Abednego

originally posted by: Utnapisjtim
a reply to: Abednego

The Apocalypse, the last book of the Bible, ends with the words:

...μετὰ πάντων ἁγίων Ἀμήν



Transliterated 'Meta panton hageon amen' -- word by word translated: 'with all holy Amen.'

Looking at the ending of the Apocalypse in the opposite end of the Bible from Genesis 1:1, there is a similar word to Hebrew "accusative marker" את, and that's Heb אמן transliterated into Gr ἀμήν "amen".

Going through Strong's numbers 539 through 552 אמן 'amn' and derivations has many lexical definitions. As an adverb it means "truly" or "verily", but as a verb it means "to believe" and as a noun m. אמן means "faithfulness" and "master" or "artist", depending on vocalisation. As noun f. becomes אמנה "faith" or "upbringing" and "nourishment" and finally, אמנות meaning "pillar".

In the Greek NT texts it is left untranslated. As in the quote above, it is transliterated from the Heb אמן into Gr ἀμήν and often so, further into Eng "Amen" in many modern bible versions. In the Gospels, ἀμήν is often translated into "truly" or "verily", but also simply left to read Amen. Jesus seems to use this word a lot, typically along the lines of "Verily, verily I say to you...", he even keeps repeating it, as if to emphasise the Emphasiser so to speak. Sort of reminding me of Jesu' words:

Truly, I say to you […] Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away.



Refs:
==> biblehub.com... (last verse of the Apocalypse - interlinear)
==> biblehub.com... (compare with Strong's 539 through 552)

Remember this, Amen it could be the Word (is a name). The letter aleph is silent ( you do not pronounce it unless it has the ' mark ). So is just "MN". "... but my WORD will not pass away", He may be speaking of His father.


Firstly. As far as I know, the system of diacritics or niqquds in Hebrew was a source of conflict ever since they surfaced around the time of the 2nd Temple in various systems. The Torah was originally composed without diacritics or even punctuation and spaces. Exactly how the different syllables sounded changed over time, but the text basically stayed more or less the same, coded in 22 consonants and with rules for vocalisation that has changed over time, getting evermore intricate.

Secondly. The Word. It could also simply be that he meant that he wanted to illustrate that the physical world will eventually wither away and disappear, but his promise (idea => word => truth => knowledge => science) will never diminish.

I'm not sure I follow you with the connection between MN and father which is AB. The closest I got was n. Manna, and as a v. "to ordain" or "number". Can you please explain?


An interesting note is that the name Amon-Ra in Egypt is spell the same way but with the letter Yod at the beginning.
A theory I have is that they have the same GOD.
Isaiah 19:24
24In that day Israel will be the third party with Egypt and Assyria, a blessing in the midst of the earth, 25whom the LORD of hosts has blessed, saying, "Blessed is Egypt My people, and Assyria the work of My hands, and Israel My inheritance."


Yes, and we could mention Tut-Ankh-Amon too and several others. It's interesting that Amon-Ra was probably the first 'mono-theos' for lack of better words. And I have used that quote you provided in the end many times to show that doctrine and liturgy is meaningless, mere politics. All worship the same God in his own way. They use different names and hold different stories, but under scrutiny, the same God appears in all religions, like how one could recognise aspects of the God of Jesus and Abraham in the God (Atum?) of Hermes, and in extension, the Gnostics, since their cosmology and concept of God seems to reflect Hermetic cosm. in a way, and among the Nag Hammadi books they found lots of Hermetic works.

Abraham understood this, he found his One-God in Uruk (Ur in Chaldea), but in the process of searching, he nearly(?) sacrificed Isaac to what appears to have been Mlk (Moloch, from Melek "king"). Moses seems to have rediscovered the One-God in Egypt (Huhu? Amon-Ra?), but that's a whole different story alltogether.
edit on 13-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: misc clarifications + added part with Hermes and Nag Hammadi. Lineshift last §


ETA: As I mentioned earlier there is certain abstract similarities between Classical Hebrew and modern Norwegian and English. For instance, you will recognise the Tetragrammaton in the question: "Ja, hvem er Gud" restructured into "Jahve mer Gud" and in English, that sentence becomes "Yes, who is God?" or even "Jesu's God" as if you can read between the li(e)ns (please bear with me): No. "Jahve more God" contra Eng. "Jesus is God".

ETA2: There are layers to language and a bunch of religious bickery between the lines, and all of a sudden you are in Egypt, then Jerusalem, then in Sodom, then Rome and so on. A vast array of different pantheons and religious/linguistic traditions seem to be included, for the ancients made whole religions and magic languages surrounding syllables and root words. There are just that many syllables, and they all seem to have their proper deity, and depending on the definitions we (like Abraham did) define, IF we choose to enter that cesspool of nonsense and nightmare. Truly the smoke from hell, only lighted up here and there by sparks of the divine, but it's a losing fight trying to battle those demons.
edit on 13-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: have to go



new topics

top topics
 
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join