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Astronomers Photograph New Supernova in Galaxy M82

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posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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Just before 4:00am while most of us were sleeping, astronomers observed a target they were alerted to through the Astronomer’s Telegram alert system (yes, that’s a thing) and confirmed a brand spanking new supernova in a galaxy called M82, aka the Cigar Galaxy.



Source


One of the closest stellar explosions for years has been spotted in a relatively nearby galaxy that is a favourite target for amateur astronomers. The supernova appeared in the galaxy Messier 82, or M82 for short, which lies about 11.4 million light-years away, right on our doorstep in cosmic terms.



Estimates of its brightness put it at a little above 12th magnitude, making it a telescopic target. However, supernova experts say it was discovered early in its explosive outburst and so could reach magnitude 8, which would make it visible in binoculars.


Source




I don't have much to add, but I wanted to share this with y'all.

Enjoy!




posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by LeatherNLace
 

Thanks for posting this.


The shifting photos highlights the supernova, but it also makes the other stars look like they are blowing up a little also.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


The two images were made with different telescopes; you can tell from the diffraction spikes on one of the bright stars in the first image vs the new image which lacks diffraction spikes. One telescope had a spider vane, the other did not. Here's some video I shot of the supernova last night with my scope:

Here's a video of the same galaxy from a couple years ago with the same telescope but a different camera:



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:15 AM
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Imagine it in our Present time! It IS happening NOW, not 12 million years ago.
For that Star, the residue in its timeline may be creating something new, but we will never know. We are its future, and now we are seeing its past...Absolutely magnificent!



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by Starwise
 


I think the past/future aspect of space is probably one of the coolest things about it for me. OP thanks for posting this. Those pics are fantastic.



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