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Practical Cold Weather advice.

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posted on Jan, 30 2014 @ 08:00 AM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 


When I was a young woman I once did a job with PETA where we went into a Gortex facility pretending to apply for a job, while another made a call to the receptionist to distract her at that same time, we then went in cameras in hand to the animals cells to take pictures and escape with as many of the tortured and VERY healthy ex racing dogs who were being used for experimentation by Gortex.

It was like the worst nightmare!!! Scary as hell and it was a one time thing for me but I was glad to expose such a torture chamber.

Gortex...


Edit to say to the OP that I commend your thoughts on this thread and the need to help save lives and limbs with some practical points. If we are moving into a natural weather pattern of a mini ice age, people are going to have to learn how to stay alive in climates which will become more deadly. This is another good reason to grow hemp, it is fast maturing and is an easy source of heat for cooking and warmth. I suggest everyone look for small heating sources such as a woodstove even if they do not plan to use it now, it may be one of those staying in place items they will truly need. I personally have 3 and if the time comes will have them installed into garages for people who may need to move in but that I dont really want living in my home or that require their own personal space. Buying stove pipe and everything you will need to safety install can be purchased in increments if cost is prohibited.
edit on am131amThu, 30 Jan 2014 08:09:26 -0600 by antar because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 30 2014 @ 08:21 AM
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Op if the cold weather involved snow stay out of Georgia (US). Look at Atlanta the last 2 days



posted on Jan, 31 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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Oh easy peasy for you to say, mister southern man if I read correctly somewhere around here


True, but we haven't been immune either this year. Of course, for most Floridians, 40 is considered freezing. I did live in Alaska a bit as a kid though, so I know cold.

Still, the advice is simple, but true. If too damn cold...stay inside!\

I'm a weird Floridian though. It could be 30 outside, and I won't even have the heat on in the house, and sleeping in only a sheet, while my wife is wrapped up in a sheet, blanket, and comforter, and with a few dogs crowded around her, hehe.



posted on Feb, 3 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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kelbtalfenek
While I am not a survivalist by any means, I have a list of things I keep in my car at all times.

Shovel
String or rope
knife
1 gallon water
blankets
Food (usually 1 jar of peanut butter)

In case any emergency happens, I should be prepared. Hopefully it never happens though.

And another concern is, fuel. Always have a full tank or close to a full tank of fuel when you are going to be driving in snow, or snowy conditions. Be prepared for the worst case scenario.


All is good in your list but the jug of water will become a jug of split ice in your trunk toots sweet :-)
Regards, iwinder



posted on Feb, 4 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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Here is another item that We can vouch for, cement is a problem with ice and salt ( Rock salt will over time destroy your drive and walks)

We use clay kitty litter on the back steps to stop the slip and falls, when the sun is shining we use Pickling salt as it is very easy on cement compared to rock salt.

This was learned after 3 broken ribs on a cold winters morning.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


I'll use the ash from the woodstoves and fireplace.
same effect, darker color speeds solar melting.
but ash is free and I would have just thrown it out anyway



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 01:37 PM
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HardCorps


Never wear anything Metal against your skin in subzero temps! no earrings watches, necklaces, eyeglass frames, anything metal will freeze to your flesh.



Oh, give me a break.

Being from a country with frequent coldest winter temps around anything from -20 to -45C for weeks in a row at the extreme, and having earrings, watches, bracelets etc. on all year round have i never had any trouble with them in the winter. So this one is just BS. Other things on your OP i concur with mostly.



posted on Feb, 6 2014 @ 06:29 PM
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HardCorps
reply to post by Iwinder
 


I'll use the ash from the woodstoves and fireplace.
same effect, darker color speeds solar melting.
but ash is free and I would have just thrown it out anyway


We save our fire place ash as well, we use it in the composters and we have never thought about using it for ice.
Thanks for the information and we will give the ash a shot very shortly, probably tonight as it is snowing again here:-)

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Feb, 13 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Ash isn't an ice melt like salt.
but it works because the darker color absorbs heat/sunlight and just melts right threw.
don't do it if its windy out.



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 


I just wanted to report some awesome news, and thank you again for this VIT, HardCorps.


FINALLY, yesterday, the temps in my area rose above and sustained above 32F for the first time in nearly 2 months!!

My children were finally able to go build snowmen, throw snowballs, etc. without temps and windchill being too dangerous.

I took advice from this thread and trashed the made in China boots. We all now have made in Canada boots ( although costing a pretty penny-it is worth it), that have saved us from frostbite, etc. I had a minor incident with that previously with my toes. My feet still don't feel quite " right" but that goes with the territory, I suppose.

For anyone living in a warmer climate right now, please pay attention.


This is only our 2nd full winter living in a different/totally different climate. Last year was not bad at all so I guess we considered that the "normal". Prior to that we lived in the California desert and considered ourselves "prepared to survive" reasonably from dust storms, red flag smog, drought, and even the occasional flooding.

You never know where a career may lead you (to frozen hell). So no matter where you may be, investigate before you proceed (unlike us!)

Live and learn.

This very cold, snowy, icy weather has thrown us for a loop. Had it not been so extreme, it was to the point that I was getting ready to put myself into a counselor or looney bin, lolz.

Here's hoping for warmer times. If not, we are now prepared to the extent we can be.

Best to all in fighting any other cold wars!
. Let's wish that they are minor at best.



posted on Feb, 19 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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Lithops

HardCorps


Never wear anything Metal against your skin in subzero temps! no earrings watches, necklaces, eyeglass frames, anything metal will freeze to your flesh.



Oh, give me a break.

Being from a country with frequent coldest winter temps around anything from -20 to -45C for weeks in a row at the extreme, and having earrings, watches, bracelets etc. on all year round have i never had any trouble with them in the winter. So this one is just BS. Other things on your OP i concur with mostly.


With all due respect, I think you have over-simplified your position.

Do you believe in evolution at all?

If so, then you know adaptation is part of the process. Since you are from a country with "frequent coldest winter temps" than you and your countrymen have adapted to this. Some of us have not.

Plus, concerning the subject of metal objects, I don't think you take into account many variables that might come into play such as humidity, wind speeds, etc. that vary from region to region.

Just take a look at some of the news and stories in the US where children, dogs, etc. have faced injuries due to metal and extreme cold exposure.

Peace, and enjoy your climate - also, visualize how you would feel/react to extreme heat exposure




posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by watchesfromwall
 


I remember this one time shoveling snow while wearing those thick cotton work gloves you buy in the gardening department.
anyway, soon enough those gloves got wet from my body heat and the melting snow. Decided to go in the house and warm up. The instant I put my 'Gloved' hand on the door knob the glove flash-froze to that knob and the only way to get lose was to pull my hand out of the glove and leave it hanging there.

BTW the news this morning says another artic vortex is coming back late next week.



posted on Feb, 21 2014 @ 03:53 PM
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HardCorps
reply to post by watchesfromwall
 


I remember this one time shoveling snow while wearing those thick cotton work gloves you buy in the gardening department.
anyway, soon enough those gloves got wet from my body heat and the melting snow. Decided to go in the house and warm up. The instant I put my 'Gloved' hand on the door knob the glove flash-froze to that knob and the only way to get lose was to pull my hand out of the glove and leave it hanging there.


That just hurts to think about/visualize!



BTW the news this morning says another artic vortex is coming back late next week.


Yes, so I heard.
unfortunately, I spoke too soon in my last post. I thought spring was on the way, but the warmer weather decided it had it's on mind resulting in severe thunderstorms and high winds. Then the flooding and black ice. I saw 3 wrecks within 2 miles earlier this morning


We shall trudge on and hopefully survive this long winter. Best to you and yours.



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