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Super Ball Bot could explore Saturn Moon Titan

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posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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I know this isn't necessarily anything new here on ATS but I thought I'd post this because it's a new article on this subject. Now it seems that scientists want to use the idea of a "bouncy" rover to explore Titan because it would be better suited on Titan's varied surface. I guess this would be better than a rover but why Titan and why now? I think a better bet for finding life is Encelladus. "There's fish under that there ice...!"

What say you, ATS?
www.space.com...




posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Send a half dozen rovers to both moons, and dozens more to other moons. Why are humans sending just one rover at a time when. with not that much of an expense compared to military expenditure, we could be sending robotics to many planets and moons to collectively build a better picture of the entire solar system.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:00 PM
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Aleister
reply to post by lostbook
 


Send a half dozen rovers to both moons, and dozens more to other moons. Why are humans sending just one rover at a time when. with not that much of an expense compared to military expenditure, we could be sending robotics to many planets and moons to collectively build a better picture of the entire solar system.


Maybe they don't want to find anything. Maybe that was never the point.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 05:10 PM
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Titans probably my favorite moon.

seeing as its got huge lakes of Hydrocarbons Im surprised the USA havent found WMD there and have tried to occupy it.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 07:06 PM
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This may be the reason......



Cassini has already found large lakes – most likely made of hydrocarbons such as liquid methane – on Titan's surface. But a team of scientists using NASA's Cassini spacecraft have now found indirect but telltale signs of a subsurface sea, perhaps of water as well as ammonia, which would act like antifreeze.

The data suggest that the ocean, perhaps more than 15 miles deep, is sandwiched between two layers of ice, each less than 60 miles (100 kilometers) thick. It rides atop one layer of ice covering the moon's rocky core and appears to be capped with another ice layer that forms Titan's surface.


Source

edit on 23-1-2014 by Kashai because: Content edit



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