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Beethoven "Moonlight" Sonata How It Was Meant To Be Played - Amazing

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posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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There were parts that I liked, but it mostly sounded cacophonic. Perhaps fast piano music will make more auditory sense to my brain after a few more plays.




posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


I swear I saw 6 fingers on each hand in some moments.

Playing it for 3rd time already. Must be subliminally addictive.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 

Bravo!! Bellissimo!!

Thanks for posting.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


This is how I've always heard this movement played. My mother used to play this (and lots of other pieces) a lot when I was a child. I think of Beethoven almost like the soundtrack to my childhood. There is some music that is very nice - lovely, stirring, etc. Then there is music that is absolutely transcendent. A lot of Beethoven's works fit into the transcendent category, IMO. I think the same distinction can be made for modern music of all sorts - jazz, rock, R&B, bluegrass, rap, pop, etc. Some is merely catchy, but some really captures the essence - joy, pain, beauty, and wonder - of the human experience. The piece in the OP speaks to my soul.
Thanks for posting it for our enjoyment!



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 06:33 AM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Do not be deterred Django Rheinhardt played the guitar with two fingers
and he is probably one of the greatest players of classical jazz

check out his videos on youtube some really fast playing

One of my favourite producers from modern times and great guitarists who has probably produced more hit records than anyone I know is Nile Rodgers

anyways my favourite ludvig van piece is



I love this song , it makes me smile , cry and so happy



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 06:44 AM
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Awesome performance here. Reminds me of the background music of early-20th Century silent films.



posted on Jan, 23 2014 @ 08:50 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Amazing! Don't even recognize it but I like it! Great find. I love moonlight sonata too.



posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Not to be an utter arse, I still feel a need to come with some notes: The third movement of Beethoven's piano sonata No 14 (orig. called 'Sonata quasi una fantasia') is called 'presto agitato', and though many refer to all three movements as "the Moonlight sonata" it's actually just the first movement ('adagio sostenuto') that is correctly refered to as 'Moonlight'. Besides, it's not a "real" sonata if one is to be utterly annoying


Here's the third movement for electric guitar, the metal way:

Kinda shows the timeless nature of Beethoven


The name "Moonlight Sonata" has its origins in remarks by the German music critic and poet Ludwig Rellstab. In 1832, five years after Beethoven's death, Rellstab likened the effect of the first movement to that of moonlight shining upon Lake Lucerne.
Wikipedia source

Lovely piece nevertheless. Been years since I listened to good ol' Ludwig van. Thanx!



posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


I did not know that about the movements. I have say the first movement is my favorite, however I will say that this third pass absolutely sounds like life. Fast, free, wonderful when at it's finest.



posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


A Clockwork Orange All The Way............ I Love It:-)



posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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I thought her performance was absolutely astounding and amazing to watch and listen to.

I find it very difficult -- even with her rest strokes -- to hear the beauty and melody of the piece. I much prefer the warmth and melancholy of the original piece, played in pianissimo, or quietly. ......... with heart. It is evocative as originally written. It is impressive at hyperspeed, but not nearly as ............ what's the word.......... passionate?

Just my opinion.



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 10:02 AM
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Besides, it's not a "real" sonata if one is to be utterly annoying


Why do you think it isn't a 'real' sonata? because none of the movements follow the sonata form? because it doesn't comply to fast-slow-fast conventions?

IMO, if Beethoven called it a sonata, it is - even if it doesn't follow Haydn and Mozart's form. (Otherwise, most of the Scriabin sonatas wouldn't be sonatas at all...)
edit on 25/1/14 by diqiushiwojia because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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diqiushiwojia

Besides, it's not a "real" sonata if one is to be utterly annoying


Why do you think it isn't a 'real' sonata? because none of the movements follow the sonata form? because it doesn't comply to fast-slow-fast conventions?

IMO, if Beethoven called it a sonata, it is - even if it doesn't follow Haydn and Mozart's form. (Otherwise, most of the Scriabin sonatas wouldn't be sonatas at all...)


Don't worry, it is a sonata al right, it's just that Beethoven challenged the tact and form of the sonata with this piece. Sonatas were pop-songs back then, one would expect up-beat majors and playful melodies, almost like Brittany Spears or Justin Bieber today, but in this piece good ol' Ludwig van starts off with what sounds like a funeral march and ends with something even more sinister, I sense war and fear in the lines of the Presto, bringing my mind to other works of his, like the famous first movement of his fifth symphony.



posted on Jan, 26 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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When I think of moonlight sonata I hear the dreamy melodic and poignant notes that conjure up visions of dark clouds passing the lunar disk in the dead of night. While this rendition is in no doubt skilfully executed to me it lacks the poise and brooding I associate with the traditional performance we all recognize.

I don’t hear a moonlit landscape here I don’t see the ghostly swaying branches picked out in pale blue nocturnal light rather I expect Nosferatu to spring out and bite the neck of an unconvincingly terrified maiden.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by brianporter
 


This sonata has three parts, this thread is focused on the last and third movement or part. It's played more or less exactly as Beethoven intended. The part you think of is most likely the first movement.




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