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Plant Virus Makes Bizarre Kingdom Jump to Honeybees

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posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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...follows a surprising discovery involving a virus that typically infects the Plant Kingdom - Tobacco Ringspot Virus (TRSV).

U.S. and Chinese researchers report their findings in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

The plant virus has somehow jumped to the Animal Kingdom, now infecting honeybees.


www.activistpost.com...


This really is bizarre, so incredible, I had to check the actual study abstract to believe it.

How on earth did a PLANT virus infect honeybees?

Even with this, I still believe pesticide makers are at fault, along with the EPA for continuing to approve them as safe when their promises of safety fall flat and lead to the destruction of the genetic lineage of bees.

Where do you think this is going and is there any hope for them if they are now getting diseases from other kingdoms?




posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


"This really is bizarre, so incredible, I had to check the actual study abstract to believe it."

Is it really that incredible? They have added insect and animal genes to the crops.
None of the jumps between species happened before that!



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 05:07 PM
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Plants, Animals and insects, Including us...is there nothing Monsanto can't taint? We're doomed if we don't stop it!



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 05:14 PM
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Oh that's just great... as if the bees weren't having a hard enough time.




posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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Star/flag for a very significant piece of news. This is extremely serious. We cannot afford to lose the bees.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Kmhotaru
 

Well with them doing things like GURT at Monsanto I think they opened the door to additional cross species
jumping, and making the likelihood of cross species mutation of viruses much worse.

Alot of ppl do not really realize how far they have gone with the DNA changes to plant, splicing in viruses
from other species that are not even plants, even knowing the viruses are highly likely to mutate.

So while they roll the dice with splicing all kinds of stuff into the food supply, the french do an independent
study into GMO and find the incident of tumors in rats is much higher just after the short test window that
was used by Monsanto and any "paid off corrupt" test lab they puppeteered for results.

Keep in mind this is what they are telling us, what are they doing that they don't reveal to the public....

Some ppl wonder why the U99 wheat rust exploded world wide, I on the other hand turn to an old latin phrase
"Cui Bono", aka who benefits...



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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Char-Lee
None of the jumps between species happened before that!


Any data to verify your claim?

Viruses transfer RNA between one another, regardless of virus type. Ergo there is always the possibility of airborne HIV that affects corn, should the right conditions occur. IMO this was one of those times where we just happened to catch what happens in the natural world on a daily basis.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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Char-Lee
reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


Is it really that incredible? They have added insect and animal genes to the crops.
None of the jumps between species happened before that!


No, it isn't - not when you put it that way! I know it happens but it seems to be happening a lot more lately. A kingdom jump is still so unfathomable to me. Imagine one of us catching a plant virus and being all spotty with a disease never seen before in humans...



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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Lipton

Char-Lee
None of the jumps between species happened before that!


Any data to verify your claim?

Viruses transfer RNA between one another, regardless of virus type. Ergo there is always the possibility of airborne HIV that affects corn, should the right conditions occur. IMO this was one of those times where we just happened to catch what happens in the natural world on a daily basis.


I guess I should have worded more carefully.

There used to be something scientists called "The species barrier".
In recent years the term, for the first time has been used often in new illnesses passing between species.
The barrier is now broken I doubt that concept will even be used anymore, and that IMO is because we have been messing with biology of all living things. Either that or it is a plague that goes along with end times.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by Kmhotaru
 



Diseases and pathogens etc... have a nasty habit of jumping species and mutating to fit into the new host. there is a fairly large number of such known about ones the list is on wiki under Zoonosis

''A zoonosis /ˌzoʊ.əˈnoʊsɨs/ (also spelled zoönosis) is an infectious disease that is transmitted between species (sometimes by a vector) from animals other than humans to humans or from humans to other animals (the latter is sometimes called reverse zoonosis or anthroponosis). In direct zoonosis the agent needs only one host for completion of its life cycle, without a significant change during transmission.[1]

In a systematic review of 1,415 pathogens known to infect humans, 61% were zoonotic.[2] The emergence of a pathogen into a new host species is called disease invasion or "disease emergence". - Wikipedia

Although Zoonosis is mainly to do with animals and humans it is quite easy to see how things like this happen, lets say for example someone eats an infected vegetable or breaths in spores from some infected corn or something or in the case of the bees they are collecting nectar from an infected plant/flower and then said disease finds itself in a new host and begins a mutation to fit into its new surroundings.
not to mention of course the huge amount of human interference with plants,animals and humans themselves, experiments, pesticides, pollution etc....

for those tiny little buggers it must be Christmas everyday in our mad world of meddling with everything.

S&F for bringing this one up



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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This is very worrying. It appears that the relationship between viruses and their arthropod hosts is extremely complex, and that transmission of diseases isn't as simple as we'd assumed. This paper on 'Mechanisms of Arthropod Transmission of Plant and Animal Viruses' is a fascinating read: mmbr.asm.org...



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 09:19 PM
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JokerThe1st
reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


''A zoonosis /ˌzoʊ.əˈnoʊsɨs/ (also spelled zoönosis) is an infectious disease that is transmitted between species (sometimes by a vector) from animals other than humans to humans or from humans to other animals (the latter is sometimes called reverse zoonosis or anthroponosis). In direct zoonosis the agent needs only one host for completion of its life cycle, without a significant change during transmission.[1]

In a systematic review of 1,415 pathogens known to infect humans, 61% were zoonotic.[2] The emergence of a pathogen into a new host species is called disease invasion or "disease emergence". - Wikipedia


Thanks so much for the explanation! Fascinating subject - one of the mysteries of life on earth, then. I never knew the term before or that it was prevalent. I agree that our meddling has the potential to release untold horrors. Or like the quote in the book The Scarlet Pimpernel - "a clumsy finger in a delicate wound." And I'm definitely hearing about it more and more...

Thanks summerlightening for the good resource.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 09:25 PM
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Simple answer? Genetically modified Honeybees and GMO plants.

So much stuff has been done by Genetic scientists to plant and animal species, that has been completely untested before being released into the wild, that I'm definitely not surprised at this.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 09:40 PM
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reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


A simpler answer.

TRSV may be similar to TMV (Tobacco Mosaic Virus).

It is a virus, benign to any number of species, being used (as a vehicle) to introduce modified tRNA to a mammalian or other genomes.

An example. . .


Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the effects of Si on viral infections are largely unknown. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Plants grown in elevated Si showed a delay in TRSV systemic symptom formation and a reduction in symptomatic leaf area, compared to the non-supplemented controls. TRSV-infected plants showed significantly higher levels of foliar Si compared to mock-inoculated plants. However, the Si effect appeared to be virus-specific, since the element did not alter TMV symptoms nor did infection by this virus alter foliar Si levels. Hence, increased foliar Si levels appear to correlate with Si-modulated protection against viral infection. This is all the more intriguing since N. tabacum is classified as a low Si accumulator.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


I've worked with TMV in the past. No worries.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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Pathogens have been making species jumps for ever.

Modern genetic engineering is not the cause of this phenomenon.

But simple stories that are easy for understand, and which put the blame for all the world's troubles on other people, will always be popular with the masses.



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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Lipton
Ergo there is always the possibility of airborne HIV that affects corn, should the right conditions occur.


Any iota of proof on this wild claim?

And...it is the 21st century, the fact that this has never happened before,
that is until Monsanto starting messing with genetic engineering seems
common sense logic.

Transmission of the Virus Through Seed of Smooth Pigweed
was documented just a few years before widespread GE crops of
Soy, and Corn in 1990 hit the market.

www.apsnet.org...






edit on 21-1-2014 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 



the fact that this has never happened before

It has happened before. It happens all the time.

Gene transfer between species is surprisingly common

Horizontal gene transfer has been known about since long before recombinant DNA engineering was possible.


Horizontal gene transfer was first described in Seattle in 1951 in a publication which demonstrated that the transfer of a viral gene into Corynebacterium diphtheriae created a virulent from a non-virulent strain, also simultaneously solving the riddle of diphtheria (that patients could be infected with the bacteria but not have any symptoms, and then suddenly convert later or never) and giving the first example for the relevance of the lysogenic cycle. Inter-bacterial gene transfer was first described in Japan in a 1959 publication that demonstrated the transfer of antibiotic resistance between different species of bacteria. Source

Original (1951) paper

Try some truth for a change.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 03:01 AM
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Lipton
Ergo there is always the possibility of airborne HIV that affects corn, should the right conditions occur.



burntheships
Any iota of proof on this wild claim?


I was attempting satire, but proof, that depends on who you ask.

Airborne Ebola:

Under conditions of the current study, transmission of ZEBOV could have occurred either by inhalation (of aerosol or larger droplets), and/or droplet inoculation of eyes and mucosal surfaces and/or by fomites due to droplets generated during the cleaning of the room. Infection of all four macaques in an environment, preventing direct contact between the two species and between the macaques themselves, supports the concept of airborne transmission.


Berkeley U: Transmission Variations:

Airborne transmission — for example, being exhaled by one host and inhaled by another. Tuberculosis is transmitted this way.


H7N9 Mutates, Becomes Airborne:

-The H7N9 bird flu virus can be transmitted not only through close contact but by airborne exposure, a team at the University of Hong Kong found after extensive laboratory experiments.
-In the study, to be published today in the journal Science, ferrets were used to evaluate the infectivity of H7N9. It was found the virus could spread through the air, from one cage to another, albeit less efficiently.


So if you are willing to accept that viruses can do 'do the shuffle' with their RNA, and there is significant data that shows viruses can mutate to become airborne and infect nearby peers then one must admit that the possibility of HIV mutating AGAIN.....HIV Strains and Sub-strains to suddenly infect a whole new kingdom phylum class order family genus species, is not outside the realm of possibility.

For this conjecture I just simply chose HIV at random. If airborne Smallpox that mutates to affect sweet potatoes makes more sense to you then we'll go with that for the interim.

edit on 22-1-2014 by Lipton because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 03:06 AM
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Thats GMO for ya!

Before ya know it, these plants with animal cells may even serve as carriers for diseases to you..
right on your plate (including cooked stuff, via Prions)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 03:26 AM
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Char-Lee
reply to post by Kmhotaru
 


"This really is bizarre, so incredible, I had to check the actual study abstract to believe it."

Is it really that incredible? They have added insect and animal genes to the crops.
None of the jumps between species happened before that!


Not at all. There are plant viruses, fungi and bacteria that jump to humans and other animals. You can catch Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, for instance. It's not common, but it happens.



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