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Strange Object Explodes Over San Diego

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posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 08:31 AM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Looks like the question was too hard.




posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 08:28 AM
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network dude
reply to post by MysterX
 


I'd think a kid with a super soaker filled with "the evil chemicals sprayed to do X to humanity" would be a much more efficient way to deploy the chemicals. If you did it with a balloon, you would have to have targets outside, and you would have to want to hit everyone who was outside and downwind. While possible, highly unlikely. (IMHO)


Although you / we were talking in connection with placing chemicals onto specific targets originally, I've found evidence that the balloon delivering chemicals into the atmosphere theory is valid.

A US aerospace company (DARPA contracted 'Aurora Flight Sciences') has been reported to have proposed using them to deliver millions of tonnes of Sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere each year, which according to them, could cool the Earth by 1 to 2 degrees C.

It would cost an estimated $10 Billion a year and probably plenty of unintended and negative effects though.

Sorry, can't provide a link or a quote (because i can't link to it). I've searched and cannot find the article online. It was printed in the Q & A section of the October issue of 'Focus Science and Technology magazine' (issue 247). I only have a hard copy available, so can't point you towards the actual piece / answer.

Scientists from Caltech are also seriously proposing this type of thing apparently too (along with cautions).

So while different to what we were discussing hypothetically, it does show there is some serious thinking about dispersing chemicals into the atmosphere using balloons, and thought you might find it interesting.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


I believe it was a project with a name and it was proposed, then scrapped. I cannot remember the name, but someone will.
As a means of distributing something in the sky, a balloon would be as good as any idea, but to try to poison someone, you would have no control. It would be a poke and hope method.



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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network dude
reply to post by MysterX
 


I believe it was a project with a name and it was proposed, then scrapped. I cannot remember the name, but someone will.
As a means of distributing something in the sky, a balloon would be as good as any idea, but to try to poison someone, you would have no control. It would be a poke and hope method.



The Japanese tried something along those lines in WWII, somewhat unsuccessfully

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by mrthumpy
 


Yep. Made of paper and flour-glue.

Experts reckon of 9000 launched, about 1000 made it across the Pacific, although only 285 landed in the US (and Canada).

Not very successful, but still, about 12% of the flimsey, paper balloons made it across an entire ocean, with todays technology, i'd imagine a lot more would make it.
edit on 27-1-2014 by MysterX because: added info



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


Indeed - but of course those balloons left evidence - some were found and I believe there is actually gun camera footage of US fighters shooting them down!




posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


There's some stills that appear to be from gun camera footage of a balloon being shot down on the wiki page
edit on 27-1-2014 by Aloysius the Gaul because: change link



posted on Jan, 27 2014 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


So while different to what we were discussing hypothetically, it does show there is some serious thinking about dispersing chemicals into the atmosphere using balloons, and thought you might find it interesting.
Airships. The cost analysis you are talking about refers to the use of airships, not balloons. And the annual cost is estimated at $1.37 billion.
Aurora

There is also a proposal about using balloons to loft hoses through which sea water would be pumped. It's a low altitude scheme though.
static.guim.co.uk...


edit on 1/27/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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