Could Some Alien Worlds Be More Habitable Than Earth?

page: 5
28
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 01:30 AM
link   
reply to post by LightAssassin
 





Would Mars maybe expand as it moves closer to the inner HZ? After watching the animation of the expanding earth theory, which granted is very very convincing, I can't help but think that solar systems might function in that manner...as they move from the outer HZ to the inner HZ, as their respective Sun expands, they expand until they start getting too close in which case they then shed layers causing the planet to shrink again until it is finally consumed by its parent star.


Interesting idea. I kind of like it and i think i know where your taking it. Actually yeah i agree with you. The music is what forms matter and as we get further away from the original sound we begin to change shape just like the music changes in frequency?

Am with you?
edit on 20141America/Chicagoq000000America/Chicago5131302014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 01:36 AM
link   
In this dimension and universe? With infinite possibilities there may be nicer planets, but I would not choose any of them. This universe/plain/density is not home.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 01:40 AM
link   
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Maybe it is home but its just not available in this state of mind, or we have to wait for the song to finish?



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 01:48 AM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Well....maybe...I'm trying to avoid delving into Quantum physics at this point in time though, and mainly I'm referring to temperature. The outer habitable zone is colder, as the sun expands the habitable zone moves outwards...warming the planet, Mars in this case, and that warming causes the heating of the core of the planet (or even just the exterior) which in turn causes expansion (basic physics) which may cause a multitude of things to happen which I'm in no position to postulate (having technically only finished year 10)....but assuming the creation of continents and the breaking open of deep underwater reserves that then flood onto the surface....and of course the melting of the polar caps.

Again...all speculative.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 02:06 AM
link   
reply to post by JayinAR
 



JayinAR
Dude, the Earth's crust, as a whole, is measured in MILES. That is just the crust.

This is a rocky planet.

There are very likely to be planets composed of MOSTLY water. Like through and through.


No doubt, there's one in the movie Starwars the Clone wars, i never said there wasn't...Dude lol.
I was stating Earth isn't a "DRY" planet, please read.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 02:10 AM
link   
reply to post by LightAssassin
 





Again...all speculative.


I agree lots of speculation but thats how we find answers.

Its also very highly speculative to assume that we can sustain life on a different planet when they still have yet to be able to even send a live person. Still makes it interesting and fun to talk about.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 02:23 AM
link   

LightAssassin
reply to post by JayinAR
 


Oops, I overlooked it....but what is the theory behind that? Maybe as our Sun expands and Mars moves closer to the centre of the Goldilocks zone then the temperatures will naturally increase on Mars....therefore creating its own atmosphere.

Would Mars maybe expand as it moves closer to the inner HZ? After watching the animation of the expanding earth theory, which granted is very very convincing, I can't help but think that solar systems might function in that manner...as they move from the outer HZ to the inner HZ, as their respective Sun expands, they expand until they start getting too close in which case they then shed layers causing the planet to shrink again until it is finally consumed by its parent star.



Well you have half of that essentially correct.

Over billions of years our Sun will expand outward.

At some point Mars will have the same temperature of the Earth... However that won't be enough to give it an atmosphere because it has no magnetic field and melting CO2 and H2O ices will turn to CO2 and water vapor because the atmospheric pressure is so low. In this gaseous state it will just be stripped off into space due to the lack of a magnetic field we think.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 02:25 AM
link   

muSSang
reply to post by JayinAR
 



JayinAR
Dude, the Earth's crust, as a whole, is measured in MILES. That is just the crust.

This is a rocky planet.

There are very likely to be planets composed of MOSTLY water. Like through and through.


No doubt, there's one in the movie Starwars the Clone wars, i never said there wasn't...Dude lol.
I was stating Earth isn't a "DRY" planet, please read.


In the context of exoplanets Earth -is- a dry planet.

If you had a scale of total desert to total water world Earth would be far closer to total desert than to total water world.





With large swaths of oceans, rivers that snake for hundreds of miles, and behemoth glaciers near the north and south poles, Earth doesn't seem to have a water shortage. And yet, less than one percent of our planet's mass is locked up in water, and even that may have been delivered by comets and asteroids after Earth's initial formation.

Astronomers have been puzzled by Earth's water deficiency.
The standard model explaining how the solar system formed from a protoplanetary disk, a swirling disk of gas and dust surrounding our Sun, billions of years ago suggests that our planet should be a water world. Earth should have formed from icy material in a zone around the Sun where temperatures were cold enough for ices to condense out of the disk. Therefore, Earth should have formed from material rich in water. So why is our planet comparatively dry?


Read on here at Hubble Site to learn more.
edit on 19-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 02:52 AM
link   
From the US Geological Survey website:





All Earth's water, liquid fresh water, and water in lakes and rivers
Spheres showing:
(1) All water (sphere over western U.S., 860 miles in diameter)
(2) Fresh liquid water in the ground, lakes, swamps, and rivers (sphere over Kentucky, 169.5 miles in diameter), and
(3) Fresh-water lakes and rivers (sphere over Georgia, 34.9 miles in diameter).
Credit: Howard Perlman, USGS; globe illustration by Jack Cook, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (©); Adam Nieman.



When you see it like that, the importance of taking care of our oceans and especially our freshwater lakes, streams, tributaries and rivers becomes pretty clear.


All Earth's water in a bubble
This drawing shows various blue spheres representing relative amounts of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. Are you surprised that these water spheres look so small? They are only small in relation to the size of the Earth. This image attempts to show three dimensions, so each sphere represents "volume." The volume of the largest sphere, representing all water on, in, and above the Earth, would be about 332,500,000 cubic miles (mi3) (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers (km3)), and be about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) in diameter.

The smaller sphere over Kentucky represents Earth's liquid fresh water in groundwater, swamp water, rivers, and lakes. The volume of this sphere would be about 2,551,000 mi3 (10,633,450 km3) and form a sphere about 169.5 miles (272.8 kilometers) in diameter. Yes, all of this water is fresh water, which we all need every day, but much of it is deep in the ground, unavailable to humans.

Do you notice that "tiny" bubble over Atlanta, Georgia? That one represents fresh water in all the lakes and rivers on the planet, and most of the water people and life of earth need every day comes from these surface-water sources. The volume of this sphere is about 22,339 mi3 (93,113 km3). The diameter of this sphere is about 34.9 miles (56.2 kilometers). Yes, Lake Michigan looks way bigger than this sphere, but you have to try to imagine a bubble almost 35 miles high—whereas the average depth of Lake Michigan is less than 300 feet (91 meters).


edit on 19-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:08 AM
link   
reply to post by JadeStar
 


OK, I got that. But I'm thinking of potential scenarios that may kickstart the core of Mars? Neutrinos interacting with the core maybe? I think you mentioned that the core is what creates the magnetic field around the planet that then enables an atmosphere...

Are we certain Mars once had a warm core and that instead a planet's core warms as it moves closer to its parent sun?



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:24 AM
link   
reply to post by LightAssassin
 


I found an article that explained it very well.
www.planetary.org...

So what they're proposing is a pluto-sized object hit Mars causing this to happen. I wonder what the ramifications for Earth would have been at that time in history.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:27 AM
link   
reply to post by LightAssassin
 


What happened to the Earth that diminished the atmosphere causing animals and plants to scale down to size and to cause ice ages and all kinds of atmospheric changes that didnt seem to be evident around the time of the dinosaurs?

Could that be related to what happened to Mars so if hypothetically speaking it did have an active core?

Seems to me like the events could be connected but im making this assertion based on a position of ignorance so i may get schooled here any minute.

Damn just saw your above post, hows that for harmony?

EDIT:



So what they're proposing is a pluto-sized object hit Mars causing this to happen. I wonder what the ramifications for Earth would have been at that time in history.


My automatic response is to read the theory and then completely toss it out and totally deduce my own ideas about what happened based off of any evidence provided and by looking in other places, like you say ok this happened in Mars, so what happened to Earth at the same time? You know what im saying..
edit on 20141America/Chicagoq000000America/Chicago2031302014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:34 AM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Well, Expanding Earth Theory might explain that one. If Earth was small it had less gravity and therefore animals would have been bigger. As it expanded it gained more mass, stronger gravity, and the smaller animals survived while the larger ones struggled to survive and eventually died out.

Maybe large asteroid impacts cause planetary expansion due to the kinetic energy released into the planet from said strike, while also assisting with animal die-offs due to catastrophic and immediate atmospheric changes.

I may also be schooled for the above comment, but I welcome it.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:39 AM
link   
reply to post by LightAssassin
 





Well, Expanding Earth Theory might explain that one. If Earth was small it had less gravity and therefore animals would have been bigger. As it expanded it gained more mass, stronger gravity, and the smaller animals survived while the larger ones struggled to survive and eventually died out.

Maybe large asteroid impacts cause planetary expansion due to the kinetic energy released into the planet from said strike, while also assisting with animal die-offs due to catastrophic and immediate atmospheric changes.



I am on the fence with that theory i have other theories of my that i rarely discuss to the fact that i dont have anything but my own observations and ignorance to back them up. The way the dinosaurs were preserved there was clearly a large cosmic event that happened. Weather it was a comet or meteorite impact or it was a rogue planetery sized body going and cruising through our solar system i have no idea. I do know however that i refuse to believe a lot of the currently accepted realm of scientific theory untill they can connect the dots on some issues that i pretend to know about, which you could probably get a glimpse of earlier in the thread.
edit on 20141America/ChicagoquAmerica/Chicago3431402014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 03:56 AM
link   

LightAssassin
reply to post by JadeStar
 


OK, I got that. But I'm thinking of potential scenarios that may kickstart the core of Mars? Neutrinos interacting with the core maybe?


Neutrinos don't interact with much of anything. They're nicknamed 'ghost particles' for a reason.

The only thing I can imagine would reactivate Mars's core would be some form of exotic matter which would add mass and while at the same time heating the core up tremendously.



I think you mentioned that the core is what creates the magnetic field around the planet that then enables an atmosphere...

Are we certain Mars once had a warm core and that instead a planet's core warms as it moves closer to its parent sun?


Yes, we are certain, we've found Mars meteorites on Earth which contained minerals which indicate Mars had a magnetic field in its past.
edit on 19-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 04:48 AM
link   
My other big issue to humans on a alien world is the plants.

If there is plant life how would our bodies take the foreign pollen? Our immune systems could end up killing us instead.



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 07:50 AM
link   

onequestion
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 





Hmmm.... You mean how dependent are we on Earth's unique characteristics and perhaps space around this region for how we function and think?


Yes Wrabbit.

Its also apart of a theory i have on why all alien life on the earth originated on the earth and why we dont leave the earth for extended period of time.


Well, I have to say, you started me off on a whole new path of learning, from your idea. I didn't know the sheer complexity and ...mystery..of what the Voyagers found that may well form a shield as much as anything to our comfy little Solar System. Indeed.. there may well be unique aspects of Space here for a number of factors...which we've adapted to in ways to make it necessary now for balance and survival.

It may be quite interesting first, to see extended time spent out of Orbital space ...then, someday...the first people to cross into interstellar space and outside our protected little bubble.

Thanks for a real thought provoking idea. A new one at that! (for me anyway)



posted on Jan, 19 2014 @ 10:31 AM
link   

crazyewok
My other big issue to humans on a alien world is the plants.

If there is plant life how would our bodies take the foreign pollen? Our immune systems could end up killing us instead.


Well, its pretty populated out there, its not like anyone can just man a fleet around setting their flags up.

Sleeper and John Lear keep saying people can't leave this solar system, but I don't believe that is true.

For Higher Up Ets to accommodate humans going forth, there are always places where there are work crews and black operations, just like is happening now in the solar system, that we're not aware of. And areas can be created that are human friendly as well, inner areas often.

But this universe in this frequency is pretty much like a hellzone!

Alpha Centauri comes to mind for sight seeing.

They come here, so how is it that we can't create the technology to adopt forms that are able to withstand the differences, as they do. With the exception that entities with higher level access wouldn't have the limits we may have imposed on us with a planet that is smelly, and has miasma, dark energy, wars, pain and suffering, inequality and starvation.
edit on 19-1-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 12:43 PM
link   
S&F Great thread, my mind is filled with questions and imagination. Would a super habitable planet also be super sustainable? Could super habitability be a factor of intergalactic food chain?

If Ben Rich (RIP) of Lockheed Martin death bed confession about traveling the stars is true, I would assume they are looking for super habitable planets?



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 05:56 PM
link   
11 days ago I posted this thread.

Now it looks like Gizmag posted a similar story, with a very similar opening to this ATS thread, focusing on research about the Alpha Centauri B b planet which was announced in 2012.



Since Earth is the only known inhabited planet and we happen to live here, it’s only natural to regard it as the ideal place for life to exist, and to assume that another life-bearing planet would be fairly similar. However, that is not the opinion of scientists René Heller and John Armstrong who contend that there might be a planet even more suitable for life than Earth 4.3 light years away orbiting the star Alpha Centauri B.

Link to GizMag Article
edit on 29-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)





new topics
top topics
 
28
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join