It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The 2014 Garden Thread

page: 3
17
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 11:45 AM
link   
reply to post by missvicky
 


I have had the same issues with my plants I was told to shake the blooms to help.distribute the pollen to the receptor site in the flower to establish fruiting. or you can get a electric tooth brush and use it ti more gently shake the bloom. I have tried it fir the past week abd waiting results. I grow indoors so no pollinators or wind to help with this. hope this gets you going.




posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 04:43 PM
link   
Summer is lingering here, still in the 30Cs for a few days. I planted some more zucchini and gherkins at the end of January hoping the warm weather would make them grow quickly enough to get some fruit off them before winter. The zucchini are growing but not fast enough. I might get some fruit off them as they are starting to flower. The gherkins are just sitting there as two leaved seedlings and haven't done anything for 3 weeks. The melons I planted 4 months ago are starting to grow quickly now that the weather has cooled a bit. They obviously like a cool summer. The tomatos are ripening but they are a bit acidic, dont know why, could be to do with the soil someone told me. I have done better than most people in the town who have very few tomatoes if any at all, still I will only get about 200g (about 1/2 a pound) per plant, certainly not worth the effort I went to. It will be cooler in a couple of days so am thinking of tilling the soil to get winter planting in, should be done by the end of the month. I will probably be complaining about the cold frosty weather in a couple of months



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 04:17 AM
link   

rwguessjr
reply to post by missvicky
 


I have had the same issues with my plants I was told to shake the blooms to help.distribute the pollen to the receptor site in the flower to establish fruiting. or you can get a electric tooth brush and use it ti more gently shake the bloom. I have tried it fir the past week abd waiting results. I grow indoors so no pollinators or wind to help with this. hope this gets you going.


Thanks for the tip! I'll try it. Was actually thinking I might have to hand pollinate.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 02:15 PM
link   
there is a food growing summit going on again this week, ya'll should sign up and cop a listen. some decent info to be found, especially if you are not well-versed in some of the topics they are covering

wholeearthsummit.org...



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 04:14 AM
link   
reply to post by nomoregmo
 


I missed your post! Darnnit!!



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 04:19 AM
link   
So, my tomatoes have survived the winter in the greenhouse. They are nearly taller than I am now (me: 5'7") and some of them are putting on. How do I get good sized (say palm sized) fruit? I have strong huge healthy plants but they just aren't producing. Plenty of blooms...just not much results. I have taken them all out of the greenhouse now and have situated the big plants where they get a lot of afternoon shade but my seedlings are getting full sun and it looks like they will want bigger pots by the end of the week. I have increased the watering and feeding as suggested by the way.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 04:47 AM
link   
reply to post by missvicky
 

Lack of bees? Perhaps you need to hand pollinate. I think the way to do it is to collect flowers with pollen, put them in a cup of water and shake it up, then spray the water on to the remaining flowers. But google it cause I am not sure that works for tomatoes.

BTW, miss Vicky Tiny Tim's wife or Miss Vicky the wine writer? Or another miss Vicky?
edit on 19/3/14 by Cinrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 05:41 AM
link   
reply to post by missvicky
 



I usually grow my tomatoes indoors and for GUARANTEED pollination just get a small paintbrush (the free ones in childrens paint boxes are perfect) and then just touch each flower on the plant in turn making sure some of the pollen attaches to the bristles. i use this method on my chillies, peppers and cucumbers too - NEVER failed to give me massive crops.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 03:05 PM
link   
No Tiny Tim and not into wine. I guess I'm just another Miss Vicky! lol! It's nick name the universe gave me. Wherever I've lived people have always called that for no apparent reason. So here I am.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:27 AM
link   
Has anyone here had any success growing pumpkins and zucchini in containers?



posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 04:48 AM
link   
Finally rained here, we had 18 mm 2 weeks ago and this set the tomatoes off again, they are covered in small green fruit. Unfortunately the days are all around 21C and it seems unlikely that they will ripen in time. So will need to look up some pickled green tomato recipes I think. We then got another 30+ mls in the last few days. The pumpkins which seemed to finally stop flowering and start ripening their already set fruit have started setting fruit again. I am wondering if this means the older fruit might not get ripe enough? Does anyone know? I might have to go around and cut the growing tips off or something? I am getting zucchini again from the 4 I planted at the end of January to replace the 4 that had been bashed to death by the extreme heat, they might keep going another month.



posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 04:56 AM
link   
reply to post by Cinrad
 


I'm guessing you live in the south going on the rain and temps.

If you are far south, you may still get a few ripening tomatoes, but they are pretty much done for the season. Look for green tomato chutney recipes or even tomatillo, it's like a green tomato salsa. I make it with Jalapenos for a proper kick.

As far as the pumpkins go, just let them go and they'll continue to bear fruit all year round, just will do so more slowly in winter. The bigger pumpkins will kind of steal the show for a bit as the plant puts energy into getting them bigger, but all should come through eventually.

If they are even a little bit off green, put them in a paper bag on the windowsill and they should redden in about 7 days, but I think you'll find the colder nights down south will kill them off before long. Probably better to uproot what's left and look at winter veg going in now to give it a start before winter really hits.

edit on 12/4/2014 by 74Templar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 05:01 AM
link   
reply to post by missvicky
 


Personally I wouldn't, zucchini and pumpkins have a tendency to spread and have pretty full on root systems that need room to grow. You could have them up to a certain size, but at some point keeping them in pots would simply stifle their growth.


In addition, you could only put one seedling in a pot, as all would be competing for space before long.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 03:03 PM
link   
Maybe someone can help me with an indoor houseplant? We keep it in water, have had it about 4-5 years, and up until now has been beautiful and green. Now it's losing green color in the leaves. I'm thinking it must be some sort of nutritional deficiency... but not sure what? Up until now, just regular tap water has been working fine. Should I get some sort of hydroponic nutrient solution and add to it? I'd really like to keep it in water if at all possible. Any help is appreciated, and I've attached a pic to help you see what I mean.





posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 04:35 PM
link   
I have a question regarding squash vine bores(spelling on that).

Every year we sem to get these pests. We only use the organic seven dust( even tried the potent stuff once) and we can't seem to get rid of them. Any help on this would be appreciated.


I am working on our garden now. It is approximately 20'x20'. I just got it turned and I am now going to hoe and rake it. I can't waint for some fresh veggies.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:28 AM
link   

74Templar
reply to post by missvicky
 


Personally I wouldn't, zucchini and pumpkins have a tendency to spread and have pretty full on root systems that need room to grow. You could have them up to a certain size, but at some point keeping them in pots would simply stifle their growth.


In addition, you could only put one seedling in a pot, as all would be competing for space before long.


Thanks for that! I have been trying to grow them in some pretty large pots but if I do get any zukes they are small or rot or die. So I've been wondering about the root system so I'm guessing you're right, they must have root systems that really need to spread out and get root bound easily. I'm trying them in the ground this year. In a wild spot by the creek. We'll see what happens!



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 06:10 AM
link   
reply to post by missvicky
 


Maybe the roots get too hot in pots?



posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 02:02 PM
link   

Cinrad
reply to post by missvicky
 


Maybe the roots get too hot in pots?


Very well could be. When I have tried them in pots, the pots are big enough to grow a tree in.



posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 02:07 PM
link   
reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


I'm no expert, but it looks hungry to me. Is there a reason you don't have it in soil?
I think you're right, you could give it a good feed (liquid all purpose type) and see how it does.
Good luck



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 08:54 PM
link   
Still 1/4 winter here, just dried up enough to get into the garden.

There will still be several frosts, or onion snows, so going to try to sow some hardy flower seeds and cross my fingers!



new topics

top topics



 
17
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join