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Good books to read from ATS Members opinions

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posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot is an awesome examination of the idea that our universe is a hologram. Especially fascinating is the way the author uses this concept to explain paranormal abilities & phenomena like ESP, telepathy, etc.

For a blend of fantasy with a healthy amount of humorous but biting social satire, anything by Sir Terry Pratchett, especially his excellent Discworld series. His books will literally make you laugh out loud. IMO, he's the only author in history who has managed to portray Death as a loveable character in his works.




posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:20 PM
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There's a 5 book sci-fi series set in the future, by Peter F Hamilton.
It starts with Pandora's Star, then Judas Unchained, The Dreaming Void, The Temporal Void, and The Evolutionary Void.

Really good writer.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 

"MY BIG TOE" (the complete trilogy); THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING unifying Philosophy, Physics and Metaphysics by Thomas Campbell. Title says it all.

"Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell" by Susanna Clark. This book about two magicians fighting it out in the 19th century England. It won the Hugo Award, and winner of the World fantasy Award. Times magazine Book of the year, the Washington Posts 'Book of the Year for 2004. Its about 1000 pages in length and you will be so sorry it had an ending.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by DustbowlDebutante
 


"Cell by Stephen King - you will never look at your cell phone in the same way ever again!"

I love my Iphone, do I dare? Will I go back to a landline or partyline? LOL



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


In my construction trade, a dictionary is one of my tools in my Chestbox.

I have to with the old school engenires and arcitechs out there!


2 chapters?? that's pushing it friend.
edit on 17-1-2014 by AK907ICECOLD because: Spelling



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Treespeaker
 


Before I joined the USMC, I read the Art of War, I own it!



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by brandiwine14
 


The book Elysium. You will not be disappointed, I promise.

It directs the reader to what the social movement of the "classes" of the human race in the year of 2154 will be like.

The poor are poorer, and the rich have cancer curing machines that healing anything almost instantly which the poor want to use.

Ahhhh. You'll just have to read it. if you do. come back and tell me what you think.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by vethumanbeing
 


Is it kinda like "The Prestige"?

I'm not too into magic, but the first book you mention sounds good.
Thank you.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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The Tao of Pooh and the Te of Piglet. I almost never purchase books, this is one of the few ones I own. Very enjoyable light reading.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 08:17 PM
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I've been slacking ass on reading anything but trash lately.

I've gotta recommend one author though. Hugh Howey. Read the 'Wool' series. Freaking fantastic. Guy is self published.

Loved the 'Wool' series, so did 20th Cenury Fox, they bought the film rights and Ridley Scott expressed interest. The characters are awesome, the story is awesome, and I really enjoy his writing style.

A blurb on 'Wool'. I know I'm doing the book titles wrong, I'm lazy.


The story of Wool takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth.[10] Humanity clings to survival in the Silos, subterranean cities extending over one hundred stories beneath the surface. The series initially follows the character of Holston, the sheriff of Silo-18, with subsequent volumes focusing on the characters of Juliette, Jahns, and Marnes. An ongoing storyline of the series is the focus on the mystery behind the Silo and the secrets it holds. The Silo's mystery is eventually revealed by the end of book five; books six through eight comprise a prequel to the series. Book nine pulls the storylines together.


He has some other interesting stuff. The 'Plagiarist' is a very short, but very interesting book (novella, whatever). Gave me some weird dreams after reading it.


Here is a LINK to 100 books every man should read. You can find them all cheap in a used bookstore or online. I would say EVERYONE should read, not just men. It's also an easy way to get family to stop bugging you about what you want for Christmas or Birthdays. Just remove the books you've already read, and it's a meaningful, awesome gift that doesn't cost much.

If you want some humor I always liked Patrick F. McManus. Granted I was like 8 when my Dad read these to me, and they are very family friendly. Not sure if I would think they are as funny now. It's bumbling outdoorsmen humor, and now that I think about it may strike home a little more now that I'm older.

'D Day' by Stephen Ambrose is a great read if you find WW2 interesting. I did a book report (kinda, it was a weird assignment) on it in 6th grade.

'The Hot Zone' was good. Richard Preston.

'Taking Fire' by Ron Alexander and Charles W. Sasser. Not particularly well written, but a fun and interesting read about a helicopter pilot in Vietnam that was basically too short to fly and seemed impossible for the enemy to even hit. His nickname was 'Mini Man'. I actually really dug this one. There's one little thing about a (I think CIA) chopper showing up out of nowhere and saving the day that I always get reminded of when I hear 'black helicopters'.

'The Gone Away World' by Nick Harkaway. Post apocalyptic read.

I'm trying to remember books that aren't on that list of 100 I have read. Ugh.

'Cold Zero' by Christopher Whitcomb. He was an FBI HRT sniper. He was at Waco and Ruby Ridge. Guy was an English Major and teacher and did some other interesting stuff (journalist and press writer) before joining the FBI. For those that don't know HRT, stands for Hostage Rescue Team and they are incredibly badass. Like Navy SEAL badass. As I recall he was also a bit old to be joining, and especially old to get into HRT. There's a mini story about him being hunkered in and realizes there is a .50 cal pointed his direction (Waco). More honest than you would think about the whole thing.

I'll try to come up with more stuff.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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I really enjoy myths and legends and I found a book about the legend of the Wandering Jew. It's called, no surprises here, "The Legend of the Wandering Jew" by George K Anderson.

It follows the development of the legend and various variations throughout history. At about 500 pages it's very detailed and I would say complete.

I'd definitely recommend it, if you're in to that sort of thing



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


I seriously jumped every time my phone rang for about three days after reading it. Hands down, one of the most scary f'd up books I've ever read...but I also couldn't put it down. I think I read it in one sitting on a Saturday. It was that good. You should dare



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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AK907ICECOLD
I like books written about but limited too:
~Space/time
~Philosophy
~Relationships


If noone has mentioned it yet try House of Leaves. It has those three topics in spades.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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I wish i could print out a list of the 400+ books on my ipad for you to choose from, all are great reads



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Patrick F. McManus, I love the book "they shoot canoes don't they."


The one about how his experience with concrete and how unforgiving it is.. is priceless as being myself a Mason Journeyman.

Awesome. I got a good laugh from your reply, thanks!

Top 100 books for men thanks for that too.



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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HomerinNC
I wish i could print out a list of the 400+ books on my ipad for you to choose from, all are great reads

My parents gave me a 10,000+ book archive of survival, adventure, cooking, etc archive for my IPad. I have quite the collection even though its not mine, but I like more than just my families opinions. Hence the thread



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:36 PM
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LouisCypher

AK907ICECOLD
I like books written about but limited too:
~Space/time
~Philosophy
~Relationships


If noone has mentioned it yet try House of Leaves. It has those three topics in spades.


It does seem interesting. I don't care for horror as many describe the book to be, although its supposed to be a love story? lol, its on my book list now. Thank you for the insight!



posted on Feb, 24 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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DustbowlDebutante
reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


I seriously jumped every time my phone rang for about three days after reading it. Hands down, one of the most scary f'd up books I've ever read...but I also couldn't put it down. I think I read it in one sitting on a Saturday. It was that good. You should dare


I will give you my opinion after my read. I am waiting for the library so send me a copy. Sounds good!



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 08:17 AM
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I'm reading a REALLY good book on my ipad right now, called The Ezekiel Code
Amazon page for book

Its got literally EVERYTHING for the average ATSer in it,bible and hidden codes, aliens, religious conspiracies, you name it.
Its starts off a bit slow, but picks up very fast. There is alot of tech knowledge about numerology in it, the author did his research, I highly suggest you pick it up and jump into it



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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Anything by Hilton Hotema, George W. Carey, Walter Russell, Mantak Chia, Ellis Taylor, Jakob Lorber, Alvin Boyd Kuhn or Brown Landone





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